Loans to Trusts

Loans to Trusts

Loans to Trusts

Trust Loans & Prop 19: Minimize Property Tax Reassessment

As you probably know, a trust in California generally reflects a financial instrument, frequently associated with a family estate, usually created with an estate attorney — and if it’s an irrevocable trust, usually with a trust lender involved — where a “trustor” (the person who created the trust agreement) entitled someone with the authority to manage the trust, called a “trustee”… also able to hold title to property or assets for the benefit of any and all beneficiaries to the trust.

Besides the fact that trusts are known to be a financial instrument good for deferring or lowering income taxes and property taxes… a trust often allows a company or a person to own assets that belong to a group of people that would be called beneficiaries, a family that would officially be known as beneficiaries to the trust… or even just one person, that would be known as “the beneficiary to the trust”.

However, frequently much to the chagrin of the beneficiaries – a trust is always managed and controlled by a trustee, which can be a person or a company. Including the distribution of liquid assets, if there are liquid assets, to the beneficiaries. Often a source of contest or dispute between trustee and beneficiary, or beneficiary vs. beneficiary.

Trust Loans for Sibling Beneficiaries

Trust loans are often utilized by sibling beneficiaries who want to minimize property tax reassessment, buying out an inherited home from siblings who are looking to sell off their inherited property – generally to establish and retain sole ownership of an inherited home.

Here is where an irrevocable trust loan often steps in to resolve these differences in objectives with their inherited property shares. The solution involves a fast trust loan to fund a beneficiary property buyout – plus usually works in conjunction with Proposition 19 to help minimize property tax reassessment or completely negate property reassessment – saving inheritors thousands of dollars in the final analysis. Californians need to keep a close eye on these new rules and regs just as they must keep up with new rules for property tax transfers in California.

Moreover, using this property inheritance solution, the sibling beneficiaries selling out their inherited property shares end up, in seven to ten days usually, with at least an extra $14,000 or $15,000 in their pocket, as opposed to selling off their inherited property through a realtor, given the standard 6% property sales commission and other ancillary fees and charges.

It adds up. There’s no free lunch, working with a realtor. No matter how convincing the sales pitch is.  It’s certainly worth exploring other options.

If you are in need of a lost to a trust or irrevocable trust, we highly recommend that you call Commercial Loan Corporation at 877-464-1066. The are California’s #1 Trust & Estate lender and can provide you with a free cost benefit analysis on trust loan and parent to child transfer.

Helpful Contact Info for a Property Tax Transfer on an Inherited Home

Property Tax Transfer in California

Property Tax Transfer in California

Commercial Loan Corp – (877) 756-4454 – cloanc.com

As most property owning Californians are aware in 2021, both time-honored and new cost-cutting property tax breaks are accessible to home owners over age 55, who have a severe disability, or who are verified victims of a natural disaster or forest-fire – as far as new property tax breaks are concerned.

Moreover, when inherited property is in an irrevocable trust and additional cash is required to make fair and equal distribution to all beneficiaries determined to sell their inherited property shares – a trust lender like Commercial Loan Corp is where such beneficiaries go for irrevocable trust funding, along with getting help from the firm to work in conjunction with Proposition 19; to insure inheriting a low property tax base, to avoid property tax reassessment both in the short and long run.

This process also allows beneficiaries looking to keep an inherited home to buyout inherited property from siblings at much higher rates than any outside buyer would offer, given that there is no realtor involved, with their 6% fee; and no pricey legal bills and ancillary costs associated with an outside property sale. It costs beneficiaries less in every respect with a Proposition 19 trust loan from Commercial Loan Corp, then it does if they were to use their own cash to complete the property transfer process, to insure inheriting a low property tax base.

Senior Account Manager – trust loan and property tax relief specialist – Tanis Alonso recently shared her viewpoint on this process with us recently. She explained as follows:

Let’s say a property value is currently one million dollars and the current tax base is $1,200. If they were to get reassessed at current value that would be around $11,000 annually. By someone keeping the property and obtaining a trust loan to properly buy out their siblings that allows the beneficiary that is keeping the property to keep parents property taxes, to retain 100% of the Proposition 13 tax base that was paid by their parents and keep that low property tax base of $1,200.

This of course creates much greater affordability than if they were to improperly buy out their siblings and have that property reassessed. The loan to trust goes hand in hand with the Proposition 58 property tax transfer system, creating enough liquidity to equalize distributions, not sell, and allow a beneficiary to keep their parents property with their low property tax base.”

Commercial Loan Corporation loans to trusts give our clients several invaluable benefits. Their terms can be a lot more flexible than an institutional lender like Wells Fargo or Bank of America. Also, Commercial Loan Corp is self funded, and that’s basically why they can extend easier terms to clients. Compliance for both commercial and residential property owners is far less strict. Commercial Loan Corp doesn’t charge any fees up-front, that’s another great benefit. Plus, they don’t require paying interest on their trust loan in advance.

The speed of their trust loans is much faster, typically five to seven days instead of two or three weeks. And if you sold a property outright, without using a trust loan, you have closing costs, legal fees; a commission; etc. It gets very expensive. Going with a firm like Commercial Loan Corp – all costs are offset, unless you plan to keep a property for 2 or 3 years or less. Then it doesn’t make sense. But generally you’re looking at keeping that property for seven or more years, as a rule.”

Cunningham Legal – (949) 386-1340 – www.cunninghamlegal.com

Rachelle Lee-Warner Partner & Managing Attorney for Estate Law and Trust Administration at Cunningham Legal, although a well known Trust and Estate Attorney, also functions to a some degree as a property tax consultant. No matter how many people she helps, Miss Warner never loses sight of the fact that no two cases—or people — are alike; and sums up her role as follows:

I want to be known as an attorney who treats each client like they are my only client. Each situation is unique and each client deserves to be heard and offered the assistance we can provide. I often meet with clients who are in the midst of stressful and emotional situations. Whether it be the declining health or loss of a loved one, my goal is to be a voice of reason, a calm presence, and an encourager through the process. Helping these clients gives me purpose in my career.”

“One of my clients was in hospice care and had an A/B trust with property in the B Trust carrying significant gain since her husband had passed away,” offers Rachelle as an example. “If left intact, her daughters would pay hundreds of thousands in capital gains taxes. I was able to get an ex parte petition filed and granted within two days to eliminate the capital gains taxes for her daughters. My client died a few days later, and her daughters were so grateful we sprung into action to save them money and give their mother peace in her last few days.”

After two pivotal events in my life — becoming a mother and losing a parent — my perspective shifted events helped shape me to understand more clearly the perspective of my clients and my clients’ needs.”

PART ONE: What is a trust?

What is a trust?

What is a trust?

To keep it simple – a trust is a legal/financial instrument that allows a 3rd party (trustee), to manage cash or invested assets; real property; securities; retirement accounts; art or collectibles and other valuables; life insurance or other annuities; as well as any number of different assets, held in trust… usually to be inherited     by a trust beneficiary, or several beneficiaries – and set up by a valid “trustor” who is a parent or some other family member.

California Trusts

In California trusts are often used by wealthy families, or by an individual, to avoid probate; to use as a trust loan & Prop 19 parent-child exclusion to keep  inherited property at a low tax base; to avoid property tax reassessment; to defer taxes, or avoid taxes altogether.

Or, when it comes to irrevocable trusts (trusts that can’t be altered), California homeowners and beneficiaries frequently make use of a trust loan & Prop 19 parent-child exclusion (formerly a Prop 58 exclusion) when inheriting a home in California & looking for trust loan property tax savings, and possibly buying out siblings that are inheriting the same property, that are looking to to sell their property shares for a higher price than an outside buyer would offer them.

Many people believe that beneficiaries get access to inherited assets more rapidly with a trust than they would through an estate with a Will… However, that is often not the case.  Inherited assets held in a trust fund are frequently received from any number of different “final distribution” or inheritance payout schedules – i.e., for example cash distribution every five or ten years; or when a beneficiary turns 21, or 30, or 50, or on some other birthday. 

A Spendthrift Clause (written into many California trusts) will make a trust even more inflexible, and insufferable for the beneficiary.

Trusts can be arranged in all sorts of ways, to specify exactly how and when inherited assets pass on to beneficiaries.  Often stemming from the view the person leaving the trust had of the beneficiary… whether he is responsible handling money, or if she   is a spendthrift with liquid assets… and so forth.

Different Types of Trusts

A Marital or “A” Trust is designed to provide benefits to a surviving spouse; generally included in the taxable estate of the surviving spouse

A Bypass or “B” Trust (also referred to as a “credit shelter trust”) is   established to bypass a surviving spouse’s estate in order to make full use of any federal estate tax exemption for each spouse

A Testamentary Trust is created through a Will after a someone   passes away, with funds subject to probate and transfer taxes; and  often continues to be under probate court supervision.

An Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT) is an irrevocable trust designed to exclude life insurance proceeds from the deceased’s taxable estate while providing liquidity to the estate and/or the trusts’ beneficiaries.

A Charitable Lead Trust makes specific assets available to a charity; with the balance of the decedent’s assets going to his or her  beneficiaries.

A Charitable Remainder Trust enables a beneficiary to receive an income stream for a defined period of time and stipulate that any remainder go to a charity.

A Generation-Skipping Trust takes advantage of the “generation-skipping tax exemption”, distributing trust assets to grandchildren or even generations coming of age after grandchildren; without  a generation-skipping tax or estate taxes being imposed on the subsequent death of ones’ children.

A Qualified Terminable Interest Property (QTIP) Trust distributes cash flow to a surviving spouse.  When the spouse passes, those assets will then be distributed to other additional beneficiaries listed in the  trust document.  Often used in second marriage situations, or to maximize estate and generation-skipping tax or estate tax planning.

A Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT) is an irrevocable trust funded by gifts by its grantor; designed to shift future appreciation on quickly appreciating assets to the next generation during the grantor’s lifetime.

Keeping Your Parent’s Low Property Tax Base When Inheriting a Home

Keeping Your Parent’s Low Property Tax Base When Inheriting a Home

Keeping Your Parent’s Low Property Tax Base When Inheriting a Home

How to Keep Parents Property Taxes In 2021

What was once the parent-to-child property tax break called CA Proposition 58 has now morphed into a property tax relief measure to help avoid property reassessment, called CA Proposition 19… active as of Feb 16, 2021.  

Estate and trust lenders are accustomed to teaching beneficiaries and new homeowners freely, in unfettered fashion, how to keep parents property taxes with Proposition 13 or Proposition 58 property tax breaks. But they are still funding trusts with a loan to an irrevocable trust, and helping clients to establish a low property tax base, to avoid property reassessment… Property tax specialists like this are still helping beneficiaries buyout a sibling’s share of inherited property, through a trust loan – the transfer of property between siblings. 

Property tax relief experts are still showing beneficiaries how to keep parents property taxes on a property tax transfer, taking advantage of the parent-to-child transfer or parent-to-child exclusion (from current property tax rates); helping families inheriting a home to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting a home, and inheriting property taxes. 

Help From Experts  

Some California firms with property tax relief expertise have been encouraged to get creative, to meet new property tax challenges and obstacles head on.  Firms such as real estate issues and property tax relief; or well known trust lender and Prop 58 / Prop19 experts Commercial Loan Corp in Newport Beach, who specializes in irrevocable trust loans and lending.  This particular trust lender is now offering heirs and beneficiaries inheriting a home from parents a free consultation for property tax savings – to help beneficiaries inheriting a home from parents to keep the parents’ low Proposition 13 property tax base; while also taking full advantage of Proposition 19 and Proposition 58.

This type of evaluation for property tax savings is designed to simplify a relatively complex process, helping heirs evaluate the benefits of a loan to an irrevocable trust, specifically for beneficiaries who want to buyout siblings’ inherited property shares, while keeping inherited property at their parents’ low property tax rate – as well as avoiding costly expenses associated with selling property through a realtor.  

The name of the game is to simplify the use of Proposition 19, as well as the transaction between trust lender and beneficiary. A process that is often difficult for families to understand.

Inside View From an Account Manager’s Perspective

One such seasoned proponent of simplification of the Proposition 58,  trust loan process is a highly experienced account manager by the name of Tanis Alonso – a particularly hard working, dedicated senior manager, who works closely with her clients, and frequently their estate lawyer or accountant.

In a recent interview with this blog Miss Alonso described her unique personal approach to planning and implementing estate & trust loans for families; how property tax saving trust loans and Proposition 58 tax breaks factor into her family undertakings and financial proceedings, Miss Alonso tells this blog:

We don’t view each trust loan scenario as simply a ‘financial transaction.’ Nor do we see the home they’ve lived in for decades as just a ‘piece of real estate’. To us, this a ‘piece of family history’ in the making. And the process a ‘family decision,’ not a ‘transaction’…

Let’s say a property value is currently one million dollars and the current tax base is $1,200. If they were to get reassessed at current value that would be around $11,000 annually. By someone keeping the property and obtaining a trust loan to properly buy out their siblings that allows the beneficiary that is keeping the property to keep parents property taxes, to retain 100% of the Proposition 13 tax base that was paid by their parents and keep that low property tax base of $1,200.

This of course creates much greater affordability than if they were to improperly buy out their siblings and have that property reassessed. The loan to trust goes hand in hand with the Proposition 58 property tax transfer system, creating enough liquidity to equalize distributions, not sell, and allow a beneficiary to keep their parents property with their low property tax base.

Feedback From A Seasoned Property Tax Consultant

We let our clients know the Proposition 58 [or Proposition 19] tax benefit entitles children of parents leaving them property to preserve the low Proposition 13 maximum 2% tax base. A California property tax transfer. However, a lot of people don’t fully understand that you have to apply for the benefit. It’s not automatic. And it doesn’t apply to the principal home. explain to them that they get the assessed value tax benefit only if it’s a non principal home. You get the assessed value waved if for example it‘s a million dollar property… You get the million excluded – but the overage is reassessed… A lot of people don’t know that.

The creators of the trust get this benefit. definition of ‘a child’ or “children” is typically the adult children of a decedent…But this also refers to step-parents. Step-parents can also transfer property to a step-child… Mom can be a step parent and can still get the benefit. In-laws get the benefit as well. You don’t have to be blood relatives.

We basically introduce the trust lender, for example Commercial Loan Corporation, as a private money lender that loans to irrevocable trusts, that applies for and works in tandem with California Proposition 58 [or Proposition 19]… for beneficiaries who are looking to sell their real property shares – for the purpose of facilitating “non pro-rata distribution”… So every heir gets an equal share of the entire overall estate – however, not necessarily of every asset.

Well, if the family in question uses the Commercial Loan Corp company that we have been using for years… the loan they provide is to a trust, and not to beneficiaries; so there is no title, and no crippling 66.66% property tax reassessment.  Well, for example, there might be three siblings… beneficiaries – and a house to inherit. And this is always important to remember.

If you’re one out of the three siblings that wants to keep the inherited house, you are definitely looking at a 66.66% property value tax reassessment – if you’re operating without a loan to a trust, or you’re using your own cash; or getting money from a very pricey institutional lender – typically with multiple restrictions and extremely strict terms.”

At the end of the day, all families need to understand is the fact that in the end, they save a great deal of money on property taxes if they aim to keep their parent’s home.  If they are looking to sell, they simply need to understand that they will be putting lot more cash in their pocket  using the trust loan approach, rather than selling to an outside buyer.  Everything else is secondary, if you are inheriting property.

If you are interested in finding out how much you might be able to save by keeping a parents low Prop 13 property tax base on an inherited home, we suggest you contact Commercial Loan Corporation at 877-756-4454. They will provide you with a free estimate on what your annual property tax savings will be and provide you with information on the Proposition 19 process.  They can even put you in contact with a trust and estate attorney in your area if needed.

PART TWO: Trusts, Intra-Family Loans & Property Tax Benefits in California

Beneficiary Loans California Proposition 58

Beneficiary Loans California Proposition 58

Beneficiary Trust Loans in Concert with California Proposition 58

The use of trusts  and trust loans by trust attorneys and real estate professionals, other than the process that is  popular in the state of  California, where Prop 58 enables inherited property buyouts —  we see a different yet similarly unique trust loan process described in summary by financial magazine Barrons in the following way: “With interest rates at historic lows—for the time being—wealthy families are turbocharging their estate-planning strategies by pairing intra-family loans with trusts.”  It’s a great concept; a great outcome to save on property taxes.  And it’s nice to see estates paired with trusts and intra-family loans welcomed into the higher-end oxygen at Barrons. There’s just one problem. Only for “wealthy families”.  There is the catch.

It’s not the same as financial visionary Kerry Smith’s brilliant tweak to the trust funding process, at Commercial Loan Corp in California;  with the final outcome showing us that California Prop 58 enables inherited property buyouts plus a low Proposition 13 property tax base for ever.  Mr. Smith’s visionary trust loans are not simply for the wealthy.  This top of the line trust financing process enables inherited property buyouts, largely for middle class beneficiaries, as well as upper middle class heirs, plus wealthy property owners looking to save a great deal of money on property taxes.  No one likes to give the Government their precious cash, that was hard to make, and easy to lose.

 “The Government had plenty of money – they don’t need our property tax cash to survive!”   ge along with locking down a low Proposition 13 driven property tax base, capped at 2% max – and most importantly… for all home owners.  For all beneficiaries, for middle class families, for working class families, and for rich folks… Not just for the wealthy – as the lenders featured in Barrons view the trust loan process – only for folks in the 7 or 8 figure class.

So, clearly… States other than California obviously have their own way of tweaking the trust financing process… both wealthy and middle class families are taking advantage of these unique tweaks, not just  families that are well off, as gossip and rumors have it.

Therefore, you now have trusts paired with intra-family loans and beneficiary loans, with a view towards different ways to tweak the trust loan process, in order to help conflicted beneficiaries of estates and trusts. So – When you get to property tax relief in the state of California,   the unique pairing of trusts and  loans, or probate estates and loans, with Proposition 58 – throws an entirely new spotlight of results  out there for trust beneficiaries and heirs of estates… 

The ability to avoid property tax reassessment and lock in low parents property tax base forever for permanent property tax relief,  for any property transfer, always with low property tax benefits enabled by the use of Proposition 13… working in concert with Proposition 58, enabling inherited property buyouts and lower property transfer tax hits. Always avoiding property tax reassessment – making sure you transfer parents property taxes, even when inheriting business facilities, inheriting property taxes for commercial properties, at  the same low Proposition 13 property tax base your parents enjoyed.

California trust loans are used to resolve numerous inherited property conflicts, between beneficiaries, working alongside CA Proposition 58 – enabling co-beneficiaries to purchase  shares of inherited property, a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares… while avoiding property tax reassessment.  Generally buying out a sibling’s share of an inherited house, usually with some land – as realtors call it, “a transfer of property between siblings” or “sibling to sibling property transfer” – lending money to an irrevocable trust – from a reliable trust lender… specializing in trust loans, CA Prop 13, and Proposition 58.   That combination of skills and know-how you can’t find just anywhere, even in California.

So you add CA  Proposition 58 and an experienced California trust lender – plus a low Proposition 13 property tax base for beneficiaries, and residential or commercial property owners – while using trust loans with Proposition 58 in various new ways… This has decidedly become an unquestioned, mainstream financing process; referred by bank officers, accountants, property tax specialists and tax attorneys.  Whereas, prior to 1986, one wouldn’t be able to find this type of trust or estate financing anywhere! 

Think about this… even surfacing in a buttoned-up mainstream publication like Barrons, covering the pairing of trusts and trust loans – they reiterate, “Many wealthy families with taxable estates can benefit from cleverly structured trusts and intra-family loans…”  Establishing the fact that non-conventional uses of trusts and loans is an established process in mainstream financial services – if you’re in the 1% bracket!  Nice concept, with agreeable lenders, helping folks to save on property taxes… for rich clientele only. 

However, if you reside in California, and you’re a middle class beneficiary or new home owner, or moderately well off commercial property owner, you can find a more fair minded, well rounded niche lender who will serve your financial needs if you’re not rich, for example like the Inheritance Funding Co. in San Francisco, CA, if your estate is in probate and you need fast cash from a future inheritance, and you don’t even have to be upper middle class, and certainly not wealthy as you do with the firms and trust loan process Barrons favors…

Or if you’re inheriting real property and need a trust loan to buyout siblings and retain a low Prop 13 property tax base that your parents had, then you want something like the Commercial Loan Corporation,  in Newport Beach, CA.  You can forget pairing a trust with a loan and beneficiaries for wealthy families only!  You don’t need those folks.  You can get your estate or trust financial needs met elsewhere!

> Click Here to go to Part Three…

PART ONE: Trusts, Intra-Family Loans & Property Tax Benefits in California

California Proposition 58

California Proposition 58

Many beneficiaries in California who are inheriting property, and seriously considering trust loans with Proposition 58 to nail down a low California Proposition 13 property tax base… working in conjunction with Prop 58 (property transfer from parents) or Proposition 193 (property transfer from grand parents)  insures an iron clad property transfer tax shelter. Naturally, this provides a solution to a conflict that many estate heirs and trust beneficiaries often run into… with respect to buying out sibling beneficiary property shares, while locking in a low property tax base rate forever.  

This may not sound like much to some folks, but in fact it frequently makes the difference between being able to keep an inherited property, or losing it to the tax man or in a foreclosure due to yearly property taxes that aren’t able to avoid property tax reassessment, and consequently are much too high for a typical middle class property owner to maintain.

Trust loans are used by numerous beneficiaries of trusts, and probate estate heirs, who wish to buyout a co-beneficiary’s interest in a trust-owned home, business property, or land, where certain beneficiary siblings have decided to retain their inherited real property – while other siblings firmly stand their ground, preferring to sell their shares in an inherited property to an outside party.  A trust loan often provides a worthwhile solution to this type of family conflict, so one beneficiary, or several, can buyout other beneficiaries that are looking to sell.  

What is so interesting and unique about this type of estate or trust financing is the fact that the entire process is so different than the usual inheritance funding process, involving trust advances and probate loans. Best to side-step the “wealthy families only” firms, and to run with a trust lender that has a reputation for treating all clients as VIP customers, welcomed into a family-like atmosphere, regardless of the size of their loan.  Like the cloanc.com outfit in Newport Beach.  Naturally, a company like that is quick to secure a loan against real estate owned by the trust, which is a logical first-step, and tends to set clients’ minds at rest, letting everyone know that the process is proceeding forward in a common-sense, professional manner.  

This is completely different than the usual inheritance funding process, which uses the entire estate, real property plus cash and investment estate or trust assets, to supply heirs with an inheritance cash  advance “assignment”, rather than an actual “loan”.  Trust loans that work in conjunction with Proposition 58 serve a very different purpose, and a trustee must approve the trust loan of course, and sign off on the deal.

Beneficiaries and property owners should typically do their own solid  research on this process; on business oriented websites that are easy to understand,  such as Proposition 58 and Prop 13 focused site that offers a professional atmosphere, and provides clear, easy to digest information in an accurate, no-nonsense way… or a free resource site that covers a wide range of property tax relief issues; or even in articles on sites that can be trusted for accuracy, for example at Barrons, in an article like:  “How Family Loans and Trusts Can Create Big Wins”…  Focusing on: “…interest rates at historic lows — for the time being — wealthy families are turbocharging their estate-planning strategies by pairing intra-family loans with trusts… As long as interest rates stay low, many families with taxable estates can similarly benefit from cleverly structured trusts and intra-family loans…”  

A different use of trust loans, as we can see —  yet still a step away from conventional loans; bringing a trust and loan funding into the family mix… With trust loans and Proposition 58 moving the process into an entirely new arena, without the necessity of the involved  family being wealthy, should you be a well-off or middle class property owner or a new  beneficiary in the state of California.

In Tune with Tough Times in California – Free Prop 58 Trust Loan Evaluation – Save Over $6,000 in Property Taxes

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Prop 58 Trust Loan

Prop 58 Trust Loan

California is unique when it comes to utilizing trusts and trust loans, along with taking advantage of incomparable property tax relief measures from as Proposition 13, and exceptional property tax breaks from Proposition 58 (i.e., parental property transfer) and Proposition 193 (i.e., property transfer from grandparents). 

So if you reside in California, are inheriting property there, and want to insure you keep your parent’s low Proposition 13 tax base, along with buying out siblings who insist on selling to an outside buyer – you can go to a niche trust lender who will lend directly to an irrevocable trust for you, to accomplish all of the above.

Commercial Loan Corporation in Newport Beach, CA appears to be everyone’s favorite trust lender, as they specialize in taking full advantage of Proposition 58 & 193 property tax benefits, avoiding property tax reassessment,  making sure you transfer parents property taxes correctly, when inheriting a business facility, home and/or land; abruptly inheriting property taxes that must remain low if you wish to maintain your favored lifestyle!  

You certainly want to work with a lender that has a great deal of experience making sure that beneficiaries and property owners nail down the right to keep parents property taxes, with a low Proposition 13 tax base… for all property tax transfer scenarios, including parent to child transfer, what your attorney probably refers to as “parent to child exclusion”… In other words, exclusion from current property tax reassessment rates. And that typically adds up to saving over $6,000 every year in savings on property taxes. 

The process sounds complicated, but it really just boils down to having a lending firm you can rely on to provide enough liquidity to equalize everything between beneficiaries – providing enough cash to buyout siblings who insist on selling your inherited property; while enabling you to keep that property at a low Proposition 13 tax base.  At the end of the day, it should always be a win-win scenario for everyone involved.

Beneficiaries especially like Commercial Loan Corp’s same-day approval & 7-day funding turnaround – with no hidden fees, a simple application form and flexible underwriting. 

By taking advantage of the Proposition 58 and Prop 193 exclusion;  in tandem with a trust loan, if you happen to be a sibling keeping inherited  property – you get to retain that property and at the same time get to keep parents property taxes, which ends up being a low Proposition 13 base, capped at a 2% maximum rate.  You also get to buyout siblings who insist on selling the inherited home and/or land in question; and ultimately walk off with more money than if they had sold their property shares to an outside buyer.  So what frequently begins as sibling conflict, ends with a win-win resolution for all concerned.  

In many cases, a trust loan is necessary, as otherwise the California State Board of Equalization sees this transaction as a sibling buying out another sibling, or child of the parent. Instead of a parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion. The exclusion from present day property tax rate reassessment simply calls for a transfer of property from parent to child.

So the trust loan acts as the bridge, so to speak. You can refer to it  any number of different ways, such as “buying my brother’s share of our house” or “buying out my sister’s property shares”… Or you can call it a transfer of property between siblings, a buy out of siblings share of house, buying out siblings’ property shares, or a sibling to sibling property transfer.  It amounts to the same thing. 

Moreover, regardless of the size of  the trust loan, everyone involved is treated like a V.I.P. client, with first-class cordiality.  Which is the main reason we like to refer this firm.  

You can call Commercial Loan Corporation for a free Proposition 58 Trust Loan Evaluation at 877-464-1066 or visit their website at: https://cloanc.com/

 

CA Proposition 58 & the Trust Loan Process: An Interview With Trust Loan Specialist Ken McNabb

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Loans to Irrevocable Trusts in California

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts in California

Kenneth McNabb is an Account Representative at the Commercial Loan Corporation in Newport Beach, California. We began the interview by asking Ken to address a central issue in this field, namely communicating a rather complex process in very simple terms:

Property Tax Transfer: Hello Ken, how do you disseminate the information you want to get across to prospects and new clients? In order to address financial issues that beneficiaries need to know, to resolve what are often complex financial concerns?

Kenneth McNabb:  I tend to give general information at first, to give potential clients a solid overview… And try to determine exactly how urgent the the financial issues are, that are driving the folks I’m talking to.

Property Tax Transfer: What do you do with a family that appears to be at an impasse, for example cannot agree on the value of an inherited home?

Kenneth McNabb:  When no one in a group of siblings can agree on what the value of a home should be I typically suggest we create a Cost Benefit Analysis and have an appraisal conducted. Plus I make sure I know who wants to sell an inherited property, and who wants to keep the property… and nail down their low Proposition 13 tax base. Everyone wants that low property tax base to be intact forever, of course. Most people do not realize that they can actually save a considerable amount of money by taking out a trust loan to keep a home as opposed to having to pay realtor fees, closing costs and repair costs involved with selling a home.  In fact we save our clients on average more than $40,000.00 when compared to selling a home. That does not include the annual tax savings of over $6,200 by taking advantage of California Proposition 58!


Property Tax Transfer: When in the estate or inheritance timeline do these siblings tend to contact you, contact the firm you work for?

Kenneth McNabb: Some are urgent to get the money right away to buyout siblings…. Some even call us before anyone even passes away! Sometimes it’s a week after the death of a parent… Sometimes it’s a year after someone passes away.

Property Tax Transfer: What is the most important thing in an estate situation like that, that comes to you all mixed up and in conflict?

Kenneth McNabb: The most important thing is the loss of a parent. That’s number one. But also, they all generally agree right at the beginning that they all want to lock down a loan to a trust, to buyout a sibling… to keep an inherited property, and most importantly to make sure they nail down that low Proposition 13 tax base their parents had. Those items are always in the picture as important, even critical, elements. 

Property Tax Transfer: And the next most important thing?

Kenneth McNabb: Well, I suppose that would be – what it means to inherit property from a parent. As maybe a once-in-a-lifetime, singular event.

Property Tax Transfer: Yes, it’s definitely a profound event. Tell me, who do you primarily deal with in your average family group? Typically.

Kenneth McNabb: Not counting the exceptions… Typically, I’m generally dealing with “the captain of the team”. The trust administrator, the person who wants to retain the parents home or oldest sibling. On occasion one of the siblings in an attorney and I will deal with them.

Property Tax Transfer: What does that person, that spokesperson, typically want, most of all?

Kenneth McNabb: I’d have to say that they want to keep the low CA Proposition 13 property tax base. Plus be able to buyout the sibling or siblings who want to sell their shares in that property.

Property Tax Transfer: What about Proposition 58, getting approved, and how it all works in conjunction with a trust loan, besides securing a low CA Proposition 13 property tax base… How do you explain all that? As I see it, this is the key to success in this business. If they don’t “get it” the first time around, they usually just walk away, don’t they? People often push away what they think they can’t understand.

Kenneth McNabb: My job is to make sure they understand this process within the first 30 seconds of the conversation! As usual, I keep everything as simple as possible. I explain Proposition 58 and securing a low CA Proposition 13 property tax base in very, very simple terms… Letting them know, in plain English, without a lot of confusing technical jargon, how an exclusion functions for the property – from parent to child… I always ask them, in simple language, “Would you rather pay property taxes based on the day their parents’ bought the property… Or get hit with a super high current tax base, and pay what would be reassessed now, today…” I suppose you can guess what their choice generally is!

Property Tax Transfer: Right. Doesn’t take a genius to figure that one out!  Everyone wants that low CA Proposition 13 property tax base. Now, although you’re dealing with more or less non-conventional lending issues… How do you deal with non-conventional loan requirements? Where approval is concerned – along the pathway towards final approval for these folks.

Kenneth McNabb: Since we are lending to the trust and not to an individual in most situations, the loan process is very fast and easy.  In fact, we can often close a loan in as little as a week; providing we have received all of the required paperwork. 

Property Tax Transfer: What is the Continuing Legal Education all about? Is that for Trust & Estate attorneys only?

Kenneth McNabb: Commercial Loan Corporation specializes in loans to trusts to help our clients utilize Proposition 58 to keep a parents low Prop 13 property tax base. After doing this for so long, we have become very knowledgeable on California Proposition 58 matters. We partnered with Michael Wyatt, a California Property Tax Consultant that worked in a California Assessors office for over 15 years. Together, we created an authorized Continuing Legal Education course that Attorney’s may take to meet their California continuing legal education requirements.

Property Tax Transfer: Thank you for taking the time to speak with us Ken. If one of our readers needs assistance with California Proposition 58 or has questions about a loan to an irrevocable trust, how may they reach you?

Kenneth McNabb: They can either call us at 877-464-1066 or inquire right on our website.  We are always happy to answer any questions that they are their Attorney may have on the trust or estate loan process.  We can also provide a Free benefit analysis which shows how much each beneficiary will save by using a trust loan to keep a home as opposed to selling it. 

 

PART SEVEN: Coronavirus Crisis in California Motivating Certain Politicians to Push Harder for New Proposition 15 “Split-Roll” Property Tax

Property Taxes During the Pandemic

Property Taxes During the Pandemic

So let’s wrap this discussion up with a brief recap… and summary.  It  is completely obvious to any reasonable person that even though the new, proposed Proposition 15 commercial & industrial property tax on landlords and business property owners is not aimed at consumers per se – at the end of the day, it is consumers who will pay for this new property tax; paying significantly higher prices for normal everyday goods and services. 

Consumers that have for some time already been struggling with the high cost of living in the state of California… as have residents in, for example, other states at the top of the list of “most expensive states” list…  most expensive American states – such as Hawaii, New York, Washington DC, and Oregon.  States that are this costly to live in do not, and we should repeat do not, need property tax hikes, especially at a time like this when state economies are literally crumbling under the weight of a Coronavirus Pandemic, a tsunami of unemployment, now surpassing 51 million jobless claims nationwide and over 13 million looming evictions; plus a host of other related problematic issues. 

These costs, in California, encompass some of the steepest taxes in the country, including some of the highest gas, income, and sales taxes. In fact, the California Legislature just passed policies that have resulted in residents paying 48% more for electricity than the rest of the nation.  Fact, not opinion.

Adding a new property tax on top of these existing costs will only exacerbate the affordability issue for many Californians. The downside (ironically, there is no upside) of the Proposition 15 business property & industrial facility property tax that Secretary of State Padilla and other powerful political critics of property tax relief in California are not looking at.

We suggest they had better remember we are in the throes of a national Pandemic, with California running particularly high infection rates, and they would do well to start looking at a potentially massive downswing of middle class and working class personal income descent if landlords, business and commercial property owners   abruptly lose their ability to use Proposition 13 to avoid property tax reassessment. At the same time, if business properties have been passed down through family members, countless businesses will be impacted in this fashion, losing their ability to keep parents property taxes and parent to child exclusion in California, when  taking advantage of Proposition 13 and Proposition 58, working through a loan to an irrevocable trust… a Prop 58 transfer of property. 

The great fear is that the next step politicians who oppose Proposition 13 and Prop 58 will take, after opening the door to unraveling property tax relief for businesses, will be to go after property owners’  ability to take advantage of property tax transfer, or the transfer of parents property taxes upon inheriting property taxes in general.  The anxiety running through the state concerns fear that critics of 1978 Proposition 13 now pushing a property tax measure called Proposition 15 (formerly entitled Proposition 13 “Split-Roll” tax) will feel free to go after the right to avoid property tax reassessment, or parent to child transfer and parent to child exclusion in California, if Proposition 15 actually passes in November, 2020.         

Obviously, this will impact all Californians, raising rents, throwing prices of goods and services throughout the state completely off the map of normalcy.  If these folks do not begin looking at this issue more realistically, they are going to step into a deep statewide quagmire of economic quicksand, if this property tax passes in November.

Although politicians on the state level claim that their revised version of the true Proposition 13 property tax relief system, they’re calling “The Split-Roll  Proposition 15” property tax, includes a “small business exemption” that will supposedly fix everything. Don’t believe it.  We suggest you don’t drink the Cool-Aid!  This new property tax on commercial property owners in California will be crippling, to most  businesses and commercial entities, including landlords, in California.  The revised measure supposedly expands the “reassessment exemption” to small business owners with property valued at $3 million or less, up from the initial $2 million threshold.  Sounds like double-talk to most of us. 

One of “us” being the talented, courageous Rob Gutierrez, President of California Taxpayers Association. Mr. Gutierrez says that these supposed “protections” for small businesses aren’t even close to being strong enough to allow these folks to survive – with thousands of jobs for Californians not able to survive in the bargain! More people on the Unemployment Line.

“Because so many small businesses rent as opposed to own their commercial space… higher property taxes on the buildings they rent space in will of course result in more expensive rent for them”, says Mr. Gutierrez… “What that translates into is higher prices for consumers and brick-and-mortar stores. Dry cleaners, grocers, companies that cannot move, will have to find a way to pass these costs on.”

And as usual, who does this get passed on to? That’s right. Us. The consumers.

Faced with higher property taxes, commercial property owners with leases will assuredly be motivated to pass these increased costs on to their tenants.  They’ll have no choice.  For example, the owners of shopping centers or strip-malls, with numerous commercial tenants, if unable to avoid property tax reassessment or parent to child exclusion in California, will without question be compelled to increase rents on their commercial and industrial tenants. Next step, prices on goods and services go up literally overnight.  

So we can only further assume that adding a new property tax to the already heavy burden carried by residents of this great state will only serve to make current economic challenges only more challenging   for regular middle class Californians.  There’s no doubt about it.  Hence the need for California to keep the property tax system as is… Leaving the status quo alone. 

PART SIX: Coronavirus Crisis in California Motivating Certain Politicians to Push Harder for “Split-Roll” Property Tax

The Property Taxes In California

The Property Taxes In California

The infamous Proposition 15 Split-Roll property tax is naturally unpopular with most Californians… Of course, when did popular preference ever convince politicians of a certain stripe to do anything!  They typically do what will benefit them

At any rate, most Californians realize this new property tax, initially titled “Proposition 13 / Split-Roll Property Tax” and now called “Proposition 15”  will end up raising prices of goods and services all across California… Not to mention increasing industrial and commercial rents, not only causing their prices to go up, but worse case scenario forcing many middle class companies to simply close their doors! Or to move out of state… if they’re lucky.  And it’s definitely worth mentioning that minority owned businesses, and other concerns that are bravely holding on without tremendous cash reserves, will be particularly hard hit and negatively impacted.

The fact that (as Jon Coupal, President of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, says) “tax-hungry public sector labor interests” are determine to strip away genuine Proposition 13 property tax relief protection from business properties and industrial facilities, to bank what they believe will be something in the neighborhood of six to twelve billion dollars per year from property taxes. 

Interestingly enough, even their gross property tax intake projection is tremendously inaccurate and uneven!  If their math is that volatile at merely the initial projection stage, at this point – what will it look like when taxation revenue wheels are turning for real?  Their Proposition 15 measure on the November ballot would apparently  need constant reassessment of business properties, revising the 2% cap in yearly increases; exactly to what degree no one really knows.

Fortunately, most of the public is either old enough to remember, or has older relatives that do remember, what life was like in California before the 1978 Proposition 13 property tax relief measure was passed… Ending up saving property owners and beneficiaries or heirs of estates thousands of dollars in property taxes every year, simply by being able to avoid property tax reassessment in CA. 

It’s fairly obvious to most of us that the new property tax entitled Proposition 15 is guaranteed to not accomplish what critics of property tax relief insist it will accomplish. The outcome is rather clear.  It will merely end up increasing consumer rents;  severely raising commercial and industrial rents; raising the cost of countless goods and services favored by consumers; and force who knows how many mid level companies to go out of business… all across the great Sunshine State.  A colossal disaster, with numerous tentacles, just waiting to happen.  

Californians can never lose sight of what Proposition 13 has accomplished for them, as well as property tax transfer benefits from Proposition 58, from parents; and Proposition 193, from grandparents.  Moreover, what that form of genuine property tax relief really looks like, and exactly what it provides Californians with!  Moreover, fighting a war against a Pandemic, with tens of millions of job losses resulting from the Covid-19 crisis — nothing would help middle class, upper middle class and working class Americans more right now than a nation-wide system of property tax breaks mirroring Proposition 13 & Proposition 58 property tax relief.

Starting with the ability to avoid property tax reassessment in CA… and moving into the legal right, for the very first time, for beneficiaries and property owners in California to be able to transfer parents property taxes upon inheriting property taxes from inherited property; with the ability to keep parents property taxes, and to keep it at the usual Proposition 13 low 2% capped property tax base… For any property tax transfer from parent to offspring, or as they say “parent to child transfer” or “parent to child exclusion”. 

Exclusion, that is, from current property tax reassessment. The right to avoid property tax reassessment in CA is indeed unique, as no other state even comes close to providing this type of middle class property tax relief. And anyone who attempts to come up with  unrealistic reasons to destroy these tax breaks – claiming it’s only for wealthy Californians, or that it’s really all about seniors intentionally keeping their property off the market for this reason or for that reason – is, frankly, delving into fiction. These claims are either exaggerated, or just simply untrue.  

Faced with higher property taxes, commercial property owners with leases will most  likely be motivated to pass these increased costs on to their tenants.  For example, the owners of  shopping centers or strip-malls, with numerous commercial tenants, would be faced with  increased property taxes if the Proposition 15 / Split-Roll tax passes…   and will, without question, increase the rent of every concern you go into every week to purchase new  goods, as well as products you pretty much cannot do without.

As we’ve already indicated here, when faced with more expensive rents, business tenants will be forced to increase the pricing of their products or services, obviously to offset significantly higher rents… The long and the short of it?  This supposedly “revised” Proposition 15 Split-Roll commercial & industrial property tax (cleverly devised reassessment exemption or no reassessment exemption!)  will increase the cost of living across the board for all Californians, right down the line – as sure as we breathe oxygen and need clean air.  

>> Click Here: To Continue to Part Seven…