Why California Families Inheriting Property Should Consider Borrowing Against An Irrevocable Trust

Trusts

Trusts and Estates

Family Trust Debt Relief, After Mom and Dad Are Gone

Life in the 2020’s in California, and the United States in general, for middle class and even affluent families, is never all smooth and easy. There are always problems to deal with, legal or economic issues… family relationship disputes, or business conflicts people bring home with them, that often causes rifts between family members…

When a parent leaving property and assets to children passes away, they still, frequently, owe expenses, they often owe money to creditors, if they were elderly prior to passing away parents frequently leave this earth owing medical fees, sometimes legal fees to their family attorney, possibly hospital and lab test expenses, even mortgage payments, and more and more frequently these days – property taxes. There might also be debts owed to other beneficiaries of the trust they are leaving behind for their heirs.

When parents leave a trust behind for their children, who now become beneficiary siblings, there is frequently not enough liquidity in the family trust estate to make pay all these debts. Getting approved for a trust loan by a trust & estate lender like, for example, Commercial Loan Corp in Newport Beach, can produce the required cash to help resolve those kinds of family debts.

Buying Out Co-Beneficiary Siblings In California

As is often the case, parents leave a home to their children, which couldn’t be purchased and duplicated in today’s market for even close to what Mom and Dad pad for it a generation ago, or what Grandma and Grandpa paid for it two generations ago.

Yet there are always more sibling beneficiaries wanting to sell off their inherited property shares after Mom and Dad pass on, than there are beneficiaries or, more likely, one beneficiary who insists on not selling out and keeping Mom and Dad’s home… the family home.

Quite often, needless to say, serious disputes may arise between siblings over a contentious lack of agreement like this, whether to sell or to retain, a family home, where so much is at stake.

Frankly, these family conflicts sometime grow so out of control that family members aren’t even able to agree on the valuated price they believe their family home to be worth! So disputes can grow even more heated and convoluted stemming from an issue like that.

Avoiding Property Tax Reassessment In All 58 CA Counties

This is where an irrevocable trust, working in conjunction with Proposition 19 (formerly Proposition 58) can make it possible for you to take advantage of a parent-to-child exclusion from current property tax reassessment… and thereby actually avoid property reassessment at present day tax rates. Saving your family from a crippling tax hike. Finally, thanks to Proposition 19, property tax exclusions can  be utilized in all 58 counties in California.

Even affluent families would feel the bite of a tax hike like this, going back two, even three generations’ worth of reassessment imposed by the County Tax Assessor, and possibly suffer serious financial impact.

A Win-Win Family Property Solution For CA Beneficiaries

All of these financial issues can obviously cause a great deal of strife and stress among family members… However, with a wise attorney around to extend sound advice, a win-win financial solution can be implemented for homeowners… and certainly for beneficiaries inheriting property from parents, who either want to sell off their inherited property shares, or who wish to buyout siblings and minimize property reassessment — keeping a low property tax base when inheriting a home.

Frequently, this shows up in the form of an irrevocable trust,  which, working in concert with Proposition 19, will provide a buyout solution where a sibling beneficiary insisting on keeping a family home can buyout siblings looking to sell their inherited property shares, and, at the same time, can certainly minimize property reassessment, through a parent-child exclusion.  In fact, these days, most eligible California homeowners are moving quickly on  new CA property tax relief opportunities — to avoid triggering property reassessment.

Most Californians can avoid property tax reassessment, if they remain alert, with the right to a property tax transfer, to transfer parents property taxes and keep parents property taxes basically forever, upon inheriting property taxes from Mom or Dad with a parent-child transfer, with the help of an estate & trust lender… and possibly an estate attorney specializing in property tax relief, both who can help a family minimize reassessment rapidly and without any issues, if they correctly use Prop 19 property tax breaks.

Plus, siblings selling out their shares will end up with an extra $14,000 or $15,000 in their pocket, as opposed to doing the sale though a realtors, being impacted by their standard 6% realtor commission… and who knows what other fees and ancillary charges also being imposed on them as well. Peace and quiet will descend on the family… with every sibling getting what the want, in a genuine win-win family transaction… Not lip-service, mind you – but the real thing!



New CA Parent-Child and Grandparent-Grandchild Property Transfer Rules Under Proposition 19

California Prop 19 Rules for Transferring Property Taxes

California Prop 19 Rules for Transferring Property Taxes

As an updated review of sorts, we would like to revisit certain Proposition 19 issues governing California property taxes. These issues have become particularly important to beneficiaries and new homeowners in particular throughout the state. The following updates address measures that are especially popular with homeowners…

In terms of basics, it’s important to reiterate that under Proposition 19 an inherited home can be transferred from a parent to their child/heir without triggering property tax reassessment, with the right to keep parents CA property taxes. However it’s essential these days to pay more attention to deadlines and filing stipulations — whereas previously this was not as necessary.

Beneficiaries frequently want to know if a parent died prior to Feb 16, 2021, but the change in ownership forms were not filed with the assessor until after Feb 16, 2021 — if the parent-to-child exclusion (from current property tax rates) is applied under former Proposition 58 measures, or if it is applied under current Proposition 19 tax measures, with the ability to keep parents CA property taxes…. The confirmed answer is that an inherited property transfer is calculated by date-of-death to determine the official date of change of ownership.

A good number of trust beneficiaries inheriting real property from a parent, considering their option to buyout siblings’ inherited property shares, often ask trust lenders if a parent is leaving a family home to three siblings/heirs, will that family home be the primary family home of all three heirs — or just the one heir.  And it turns out that only one sibling/heir is expected, under California tax law, to take over that family home as a primary residence. Yet all three siblings still have to be valid heirs.

Beneficiaries and heirs of an active estate, inheriting assets, often ask their attorney about the correct time-frame to establish an inherited family property as their “primary family home”…  Estate attorneys typically confirm that beneficiaries inheriting a house from a parent who wish to keep parents CA property taxes on a property tax transfer, when inheriting property taxes, are expected to establish that house as their “principle family residence” within 12-months of the purchase or transfer of that inherited property, if they want to avoid property tax reassessment using their existing ability to transfer parents property taxes, when inheriting property taxes from a parent. 

Yet heirs are still being able to take advantage of their right to a parent to child property tax transfer on an inherited home  and a  parent-to-child exclusion; even with all these confusing and sometimes baffling new rules for property tax transfers in California  additional intra-family options are available to heirs such as buying out co-beneficiaries’ property shares on a sibling-to-sibling property share while keeping a low property tax base when inheriting a home.

If beneficiaries or heirs are inheriting a family farm, they often look to their estate lawyer, or trust lender, for answers… if they are looking to buyout co-beneficiaries to retain the inherited property for themselves – at their parent’s low property tax base – to find out if the Proposition 19 parent-to-child exclusion (from current tax rates) also applies to family farms.

In other words, does a family farm also have to be a principal or primary residence of the inheriting beneficiaries or heirs… And the answer is no, the family farm does not have to be the principal residence of the inheriting parties in order to qualify for the parent-to-child exclusion. A family farm is viewed as any real property which is under cultivation or which is being used for pasture or grazing, or that is used to produce an agricultural product.

Many Californians want to know if Proposition 19 is retroactive; if property transfers that have already benefited from Proposition 58 parent-to-child exclusion benefits are going to be reassessed… And they are informed that Proposition 58 applies to transfers that were implemented on or prior to Feb 15, 2021. The current Proposition 19 ability to keep parents CA property taxes applies only to transfers that take place happen after Feb 16, 2021.

An inherited house, when transferred from a parent to their child/heir – is expected to be the “primary family home” of an heir. Beneficiaries or heirs frequently ask their property tax consultant or attorney how long they need to reside in or maintain their inherited property as “a primary family home” to be able to retain the parent-child exclusion. The answer is unequivocally that the Prop 19 exclusion applies only as long as the heir, or beneficiaries, reside in inherited  property as their “principle family home”.

In the event that a family home is no longer used as the primary residence of a beneficiary inheriting a home, that property should receive the factored base year that applies, had the family home not qualified for exclusion at the time of purchase or transfer. The new taxable value will be the fair market value of the home on the date of inheritance, adjusted yearly for inflation. 

Hence, an updated look at certain new parent-child and grandparent-grandchild property transfer rules and regulations under Proposition 19.