Strengthening Proposition 19 Property Tax Relief During a Pandemic

California Prop 19 Property Tax Transfer

California Prop 19 Property Tax Transfer

In the midst of a relentless Pandemic, causing untold economic carnage, unemployment and financial damage  to middle class Californians, it would be advisable for the state to provide middle income and working class residents with the ability to not only make more money, if that were to be possible,  but to be able to spend less.

One proposed solution to accomplish this – proposed by respected real estate analysts and property tax consultants – would be expanded property tax relief; despite certain limitations and obstructions from special-interest groups and changes to Proposition 58.   Proposition 19 property tax breaks should most likely be strengthened in favor of property owners, with a robust initiative led by the Governor – rather than an unhelpful deferred property tax payment plan, such as he has already suggested.

Forward thinking tax consultants such as property tax consultant, Proposition 13 specialist, Michael Wyatt Consulting have proposed property tax breaks that save homeowners, commercial property owners, and beneficiaries inheriting property more money from property tax breaks than are currently in place.   

Well known Trust and Estate Lender  Commercial Loan Corp, furnish trust beneficiaries with irrevocable trust loans, working in conjunction with Proposition 19 benefits, can establish a low Proposition 13 property tax base for homeowners, and save inheritors thousands of dollars every year in property taxes.

These property tax reduction measures – as long as homeowners make good use of them and keep inherited property, or allow other siblings or co-beneficiaries to buyout their shares  of inherited property through a trust loan working with Prop 58 tax breaks – will avoid property tax reassessment.  This process will, in fact, create a low property tax base for the singular owner or owners of this shared inherited property.  And there indeed is one solution to enable homeowners to spend less.  

This helps middle class property owners and working families to not only spend less, but also to retain more cash in  their bank and investment accounts. Most importantly, this type of trust loan financing also helps trustees and beneficiaries resolve disputes  over assessor stated property values – as well as resolving often heated conflicts over whether they should sell to an outside buyer, or profit more by allowing a co-beneficiary to buyout their property shares while avoiding property tax reassessment of this family property altogether. As realtors call it, “transfer of property between siblings” or “sibling to sibling property transfer” – lending money to an irrevocable trust, for trust loan financing  – can resolve various squabbles and infra-family problems between estate heirs and trust beneficiaries. 

Noted originator of trust loan financing, Commercial Loan Corp President Kerry Smith; and other outspoken supporters of property tax breaks for the middle classes, such as Property Tax Relief Consultant Michael Wyatt,  Jon Coupal, President of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers’ Association; and Paramount Property Tax Appeal President Wes Nichols, have all stated, repeatedly, that Proposition 13 and Prop 58 should be better protected and expanded; That Proposition 19 should be expanded to better serve homeowners; and at the same time strengthened in the courts so Amendments that can potentially wipe out property tax breaks like Proposition 58 for example, in a single vote, will be impossible to advance without a great deal of trouble and expense.

California, since 1978, is the only state where you can avoid property tax reassessment at current rates; but the state does need to better protect, not water down, residents’ property tax relief options; to keep parents property taxes… and to transfer parents property taxes as well as inheriting property taxes at a low base rate for even a secondary inherited property.

Avoiding property tax reassessment is a crucial tax relief element, and therefore should be better  protected, for new homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting a home and/or buying out a sibling’s share of inherited property   the transfer of property between siblings, sibling to sibling property transfer, the right to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes – so beneficiaries can keep parents property taxes at its’ original low base rate… which applies to every  property tax transfer,  meaning every parent to child transfer and family parent to child exclusion.

Helpful information on Proposition 13 & Prop 58 as well as property tax appeals and property tax reduction solutions can be found at niche Websites like the CA State Board of Equalization and here at Property Tax News.  Or look carefully at various sections and articles at Loan to a Trust or at  detailed, more sophisticated trust loan info-websites.  Every property owner should know what’s involved with inheriting property taxes at a low rate, or a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares, or “transfer of property between siblings” – with new, revised Proposition 19 basic property tax relief opportunities that are available to Californians, come rain or shine.

Getting the Most Out Of Prop 13 and Prop 19 Property Tax Breaks

Getting the Most Out Of Prop 13 and Prop 19 Property Tax Breaks

Getting the Most Out Of Prop 13 and Prop 19 Property Tax Breaks

Residents in California that Benefit from Proposition 19

Focusing on senior residents and of course wildfire victims in the promotion of Proposition 19 was an extremely clever move by the CA Legislature. The state has been in the midst of another catastrophic series of natural fire storms  at the same time that voters were being introduced to the Proposition 19 tax measure; and voters certainly were personalizing what it might feel like to lose their home, in a matter of minutes, to fire… and of course this connection did not go unnoticed by the folks promoting Prop 19.  

Proposition 19’s backers ran sentimental, heart-tugging ads and even poured cash into the firefighter’s union.  Nonetheless, Proposition 19 only just passed with a little over half of the vote, 51%.
 
Prop 19 is a positive financial opportunity for seniors, victims of natural disasters and fire storms, and for homeowners with disabilities; or residents that happen to be grandparents that are looking to relocate from one area to another in California, to purchase a house nearer their family, specifically their children. And it’s a positive opportunity for older married couples looking to downsize, or to upgrade to a retirement home. 

On the other hand, it is a challenge for many middle class families, that are trying to avoid property tax reassessment; that are keen on establishing a low property tax base; to take advantage of Proposition 13 transfer of property, that wish to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes. It’s important to most families when inheriting property taxes from a parent, to keep parents property taxes, on any property tax transfer with a parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion. 

Moreover, beneficiaries looking to buyout co-beneficiaries, siblings, are always looking for help in the transfer of property between siblings, to make sure nothing goes wrong — that you can keep your parent’s low Proposition 13 tax base and properly establish a low property tax base when buying out a siblings’ share of a house.

Easy Mistakes to Make, and to Avoid, with Proposition 13 & Prop 19

A few mistakes single homeowners, beneficiaries and property owning families  can fall into quite easily:

1) Some families forget to execute a property LLC in order to protect their  property from property tax reassessment when they pass away.

2) Some heirs or beneficiaries are not aware that they must file a claim for a “reassessment exclusion” or “exemption” under Proposition 13 inside of three years after the passing of a decedent, and therefore may lose their exclusion from property reassessment.  This can be an extremely expensive mistake.

3) Some homeowners mistakenly believe that they are passing on a “principal residence” or “primary residence”  but in fact have not resided full time in that home for many years.  This will cause expensive reassessment issues for any beneficiaries.

4) Some families believe they can pass on an exclusion from reassessment regarding a multi-unit residential property, even though they only reside in part  of the property.  This will cause serious issues for any beneficiary or heir.  

5) Some heirs or beneficiaries may not understand that they must reside in an inherited property only as a primary residence, under Proposition 19, in order to take advantage of a “parent-to-child” exclusion from reassessment, establishing a low property tax base; once a parent passes away.  Non primary residence could trigger reassessment at current market rates.

6) Some families revise the title of their home without consulting their tax lawyer or property tax specialist, possibly triggering property tax reassessment.

7) Some families will include numerous beneficiaries in a living trust, along with  listing their home.  If some of the beneficiaries are not offspring and some are, your actual children, i.e., heirs, may lose their ability to avoid property tax reassessment.

8) Some families may shift an industrial facility they have inherited into an LLC for business purposes, while renting it out; triggering a property tax reassessment by not  filing the proper forms in a timely fashion.

9) A property transfer may occur without proper registration paperwork filed   with the state.  Twenty years later the new property owner may owe twenty years worth of back property taxes at vastly increased rates. This can be a devastating event, causing the current owner to lose their home.

These laws are complicated and different scenarios can be confusing. Mistakes with paperwork or filing procedure errors can trigger reassessment at current market rates; even resulting in the loss of a home.  Another reason why estate lawyers have become so important as of late!

Beneficiary Property Disputes Resolved by Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Over the past several years, since 2016, we have seen a fair amount of estates, or inheritances in trust, that are embroiled in a dispute or infra-family trust battle over who should be receiving the larger share of cash assets or the largest percentage of an old home left a Mom or a Dad. And we see this pattern repeated over and over again; the same words, the same playbook, similar arguments and similar claims.

Several US firms that provide inheritance loans and cash advance assignments for estate heirs and trust beneficiaries receiving inheritance assets and property have all confirmed, when asked, that up to 75% of the families they have provided advance funds to were mired in infra-family squabbles and disputes over inheritance funds or inherited real estate. 

In California a simple trust loan solution involving Proposition 58, as well as specific tax breaks within Proposition 13, resolve certain beneficiary property disputes.  Only in California is it possible for family members to buyout a co-beneficiary, usually a sibling or several siblings, with the help of established property tax breaks…

Therefore, family disputes caused by sibling disagreements over whether or not they should sell or retain shared inherited property; or what that inherited property value should be, if the assigned tax assessor value is mistrusted, can easily be minimized… Generally, these conflicts are resolved rapidly and satisfactorily if a large loan to an irrevocable trust (working in tandem with CA Proposition 58) is implemented effectively through an experienced trust lender.

If this trust loan process is not implemented properly, the wheels trend to come off the estate wagon, so to speak, and these particular estates typically do not end well.  Whereas, if this trust loan & Prop 58 process is executed correctly beneficiaries end up owning their  inherited property securely, while siblings who insist on selling their inherited property shares end up receiving more money through the trust loan process than if they had received a direct non-trust cash payment from an outside buyer.

Residential and commercial property owners in every single state in America need to research benefits provided by trust lenders furnishing loans to trusts, specifically loans to irrevocable trusts and CA Proposition 13 transfer of property establishing a fixed low base rate in conjunction with a Proposition 58 transfer of parents’ property and transfer of parents property taxes. 

All property owners, for their own good, will eventually have to understand what inheriting parents property, inheriting property taxes, property tax transfer and what the ability to  transfer parents property taxes is really all about.  Plus how to keep parents property taxes at the lowest base rate possible.  Moreover, they must understand why a parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion, is so profoundly important and creates the core of property tax relief in California… And we can only hope in other states as well.  If homeowners in other states begin calling and sending emails to their often invisible representatives in Washington DC, this might actually become a reality in the near future – and should, given the economic challenges middle class families are facing, and will continue to face for some time to come.

Goods and services as well as real estate can be incredibly pricey in states like Connecticut, Texas, California, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts… these are all expensive states, in terms of day to day living… However, decreasing property taxes down to a more manageable level can change people’s entire outlook on their life, helping middle class families to function more effectively with financial struggles, at least to some degree.

Moreover, the concept of paying yearly taxes on something you purchase and then keep for many years, might be flawed to begin with. What other large purchase you may make continues to charge you fees for ownership, for the rest of the time that you own that item?  Other than insurance, do you continue to pay taxes on a boat you own? An airplane? A car? A motorcycle? None. Only real property.  Perhaps the whole concept of taxing real estate after the initial purchase could use some fresh, new examination.

At any rate, California is still the only state in America where you can avoid property tax reassessment at current market rates; capped at 2% taxation,  as long as you own property inherited from parents… thanks to 1978 CA Proposition 13 enabling the ability to  transfer parents property taxes.  These issues are covered in detail on the California State Board of Equalization, that covers Proposition 58 at great length.  Or you can look at business oriented sites that focus on property tax relief,  such as Michael Wyatt Consulting, or trust loans and Proposition 58 at sites like Commercial Loan Corp;  or go take a look at resource info blogs such as Loan to a Trust, or even a blog like this one,  Property Tax News for information on Proposition 19, Proposition 13, and support or opposition to property tax relief in California, in the present as well as in years past for an accurate historical perspective.

How Will Proposition 19 Impact Middle Class Families in California?

How Will Proposition 19 Impact Middle Class Families in California

How Will Proposition 19 Impact Families in California

Before Proposition 19 existed, parents in California could transfer their primary residence and $1,000,000 per parent of other property to their children without triggering a tax reassessment of  those properties. After Feb. 15, 2021 that exemption, the parent-child exclusion,  was watered down, limiting access to this time-honored exclusion from current property tax rates to moving into an inherited home only as a primary residence;  and limiting a beneficiary’s ability to go about avoiding property tax reassessment in CA to a strict 12-month move-in period. 

As long as this deadline is kept, heirs will be avoiding property tax reassessment in CA without issue.  An heir’s ability to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes, and the right to keep parents property taxes on any property tax transfer from a parent, as Proposition 19 parent to child transfer, or Prop 19 parent to child exclusion, is guaranteed.  As is the right for a beneficiary to get a trust loan from a trust lender to implement a  transfer of property between siblings… In other words, you can lock in a low Prop 13 property tax base plus buyout co- beneficiaries if they want to sell their inherited property.  Amen!  And in the midst of the Coronavirus crisis, with rampant unemployment and under-employment… a 6-figure trust loan could be a life-saver.

After Feb. 16, a transfer of a principal residence by a parent to a child (heir) is only exempt if the parent was using the property as their principal, or primary, residence; and the heir is also residing in the inherited home as a primary, principal residence following the parental property transfer.  If that is not a problem, we’ll most likely see an equivalent number of middle class and blue collar families avoiding property tax reassessment in CA as before Prop 19 became law. 

Even if only half as many people as before take advantage of the Prop 19 parent-child exclusion, 50% is still a pretty healthy number.  No other transfers of property between parents and children will be exempt from reassessment, with the exception of a family farm, which is currently defined but as “farmed land” whether the property includes a residence or not. 

Transfers that are excluded from property tax reassessment do have limitations, however.  The exclusion applies only as far as the assessed value at the time of transfer plus $1,000,000. Any property beyond that value would be reassessed at a current market tax value.

Housingwire.com recently wrote: “Prop 19 will deliver needed funding for cities, counties, and school districts when they need it most. It will generate hundreds of millions in annual revenue for fire protection, affordable housing, homeless programs, safe drinking water, and other local services and dedicated revenue for fire districts in rural and urban communities to fix inequities that threaten life-saving response times to wildfires and medical emergencies.”

So how will Proposition 19 impact the middle class, working family  housing market in California, admittedly an expensive state to live in.  Although certain components in California will benefit from a new property tax revenue stream, regular middle class and blue collar families residing in inherited homes may still find it difficult keeping up with the rising costs and expensive lifestyle of California. Yet Prop 58 can still help. Proposition 58 Property Tax Breaks are still in place, despite restrictions.  Providing you intend to occupy an inherited home as your primary residence you can still save as much as $10,000 annually in property tax savings.  

President of One80Reality, Nick Solis, tells us:  ““We are definitely  going to see property taxes rise on inherited homes. California is one of those places where blue collar workers usually pass down homes to kids and other family members. Those homes are now going to be taxed at a much higher rate. It will force their hands to sell, because the properties will be more expensive to retain.”

Mr. Solis said he’s not worried about selling homes, but a new demographic of home buyers is going to emerge. He tells us: “Not     all who receive inherited homes come from money. Many blue collar workers and families bought in previous decades when homes were affordable, and are passing them down to their kids. They will see a tax increase. We’re going to see a different demographic. We were already seeing a major push of middle class and blue collar people,  that could afford a home in places like the Bay area, now moving into the central valley or other more affordable places because they just feel too uncomfortable living in their current homes. And now taxes are going to be even higher on inherited homes.”

A well known California realtor, who preferred to remain anonymous,  recently claimed: “With higher property taxes, keeping inherited homes as rental properties may become unprofitable, estate-planning attorneys are going to be very busy, as this new law may cause many people to decide to sell properties that they intended to pass on to their heirs.” 

Millennials and other younger generations will be impacted as well, avoiding property tax reassessment in CA People in their early twenties might decide to leave California, with no plan to ever return.  This is quite different than recent years, where the state was attracting a lot of young starter-home buyers. The same young adults are now looking carefully for more affordable homes, after graduating from college – even if that means leaving the state completely, with a new job; and perhaps a new family.

Another seasoned California realtor told us, on condition of remaining anonymous:  “It’s a real game-changer.  Both in terms of California properties being sold that would have been passed on through a family trust, or by the beneficiaries who decide they either can’t afford to pay property taxes based on a current assessed value, or just don’t want to pay the higher property taxes. The state’s going to make a lot of money.”

Higher property taxes or not, California will always be an attractive place to live. There is sunshine 12 months per year, an ocean nearby, convenient cities and yet rural areas 30 minutes away… “People are always going to want to live in California, but I can see life getting more expensive here a lot faster than I expected,” Mr. Solis added.

Working With An Irrevocable Trust Lender

Irrevocable Trust Lenders

Irrevocable Trust Lenders

First, let’s go back over the key elements involved in the most popular trust loan beneficiary-conflict solution available in California.  It’s worth mentioning that California is still the only state in America where you can avoid property tax reassessment at current rates; capped at 2% taxation basically as long as you own property inherited from parents… thanks to 1978 CA Proposition 13. 

And this is where we get into trust liquidity – something a lot of folks in California don’t really understand. California business property and residential property owners, in addition to having the right to keep parents property taxes, and transfer parents property taxes upon inheriting property, and then inheriting property taxes at the low Proposition 13 two-percent tax rate maximum – can maintain a low property tax transfer rate basically forever, through a parent to child transfer, or “parent to child exclusion”, as long as all tax relief requirements have been met, usually with the assistance of an experienced irrevocable trust lender.  

Additionally, Californians even have the right to apply for the same tax break on a secondary property inherited from parents.  Approval is a formality only. No only that, as a California property owner you can buyout as many siblings as you like; that is to say, as many co-beneficiaries as there are who wish to sell their inherited property shares – as long as you are approved for the appropriate amount of funding to a trust loan, from your trust lender… And as long as the co-beneficiaries are fully committed to selling out through a trust loan, rather than accepting less money from a third-party outside buyer – while you keep the same inherited property from your parents, financed through the trust loan, avoiding property tax reassessment for that point on, establishing and maintaining a low Proposition 13 property tax base.

Elements that drive this process are worth researching, to understand the subject better and simply to be able to work more effectively with a trust lender… Many of these process elements are covered in detail on the California State Board of Equalization website, focusing on various relevant components within Proposition 58 among others.  Or you can research heavily detailed business sites such as Commercial Loan Corp, the brainchild of forward-thinking CEO Kerry Smith;  or info-blogs such as Medium.com,  or perhaps  the Trust and Estate Loans micro-site; or the Property Tax News blog…  Trust loans working in accord with Proposition 19 make it possible for heirs and beneficiaries to sell their shares of inherited property, a co-beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares – as realtors put it, “the transfer of property between siblings”, and “lending money to an irrevocable trust“ – typically from an irrevocable trust loan lender.

Commercial Loan Corporation in Newport Beach, CA appears to be the “favorite flavor” of the decade, where trust lenders are concerned, as they specialize in taking full advantage of all Proposition 19 property tax relief benefits for clients; helping beneficiary siblings avoid property tax reassessment, while making sure they transfer parents property taxes correctly, when inheriting property taxes from parents, a business facility, home and/or land; abruptly inheriting property taxes that have to remain low, simply to free up some needed cash; in order to keep up a reasonable lifestyle, what with the cost of living in California these days.  

You also want to be careful, to work with a trust lender that has a great deal of experience with this process… To make sure that beneficiaries and  property owners take full advantage of the right to keep parents property taxes, with a low Proposition 13 tax base.  No other state in America even comes close to providing this sort of property tax relief. And property taxes in this country, for the most part, are high for a middle class and working class families. No other state gives residents the ability to use a CA Proposition 58 or California Prop 13 type of property tax transfer, with parent to child transfer, or as lawyers like to call it, “parent to child exclusion”.

The fact is, we need to know how to work with a professional trust lender to be able to use tax breaks as efficiently as possible, that as Californians we are fortunate enough to have access to.  Moreover, every property owner in every state should know how to work with an irrevocable trust lender to buy out a beneficiary’s share of inherited property; and basically understand how a sibling-to-sibling property transfer or co-beneficiary buyout of sibling property works in California.

Bottom line, every state in this country should have trust lenders to work with  to take advantage of residential and commercial property tax relief solutions similar to Californian property tax breaks such as CA Proposition 13, and now Proposition 19 – enabling property owners to keep parents property taxes, at a low 2% capped tax base from Prop 13… along with property tax transfer benefits still in effect from CA Proposition 58; enabling the transfer of property between siblings, or, more specifically, allowing a co-beneficiary buyout of sibling property, paying them cash to not sell out, while you get to keep your parent’s house and/or land at that super low Proposition 13 protected tax base.

If you are in need of a loan to an irrevocable trust, please completed this form and we will have a representative from Commercial Loan Corporation contact you; or you may call them at 877-464-1066:

Inheriting a Home and Keeping the Property Tax Base Low with Proposition 19

Inheriting a Home and Keeping the Property Tax Base

Inheriting a Home and Keeping the Property Tax Base

It looks like we’re back again to a proposed “wealth tax” in California. There is certainly nothing wrong with getting rich, and more power to anyone in that position, or with that ambition. However, Californians that are privileged and fortunate enough to have amassed billions or hundreds or tens of millions, really should not be complaining too mightily with any modest “wealth tax” being proposed… As long as the tax is reasonable and doesn’t go too far.

Indiana University law professor David Gamage, who has helped develop wealth tax proposals, said recently, “All around the world you see increasing awareness of growing wealth and income inequalities, combined with growing awareness that our tax system is not up to dealing with this problem.”

As a Pechter Baking company heir, a New York millionaire himself, once said – “Don’t feel too sorry for these folks. They’ll still be eating in the same restaurants!” Supposedly, the wealthiest 1% pay 46% of all state income taxes in California. With the tax cuts that were delivered to the country’s wealthiest families, this number seems unrealistically high.

Nevertheless – if you were the California State Legislature and you decided you needed more cash reserves to pay off  unfunded state government pensions – it would make a lot more sense to take that extra property tax revenue from households with way more cash than they know what to do with – rather than create and implement a middle class property tax hike.  A tax hike, for example, as California is dealing with right now – with voters often not comprehending what the details are all about.

Fast-forwarding into the near future – as soon as middle class beneficiaries are in the position of inheriting a home from a Mom or a Dad, they’ll begin to  understand certain limitations with the existing property tax breaks now in affect – and at the same time will see, usually after consulting with a trust lender, that it is almost always more profitable to sell an inherited home through an irrevocable trust, as a sibling-to-sibling property transfer, than to sell it directly to an outside buyer – collecting the property sale funds from an irrevocable trust that was opened up by co-beneficiaries through a trust lender.  A process we have discussed elsewhere in this blog.

Moreover, despite certain limitations imposed by existing property tax breaks, California still has property tax relief options that beneficiaries and homeowners in other states can only dream about, thanks to still-healthy property tax relief furnished by Prop 13; and Prop 19 – which  is now functioning as an updated Proposition 58 for all intensive purposes.  

To reiterate, it would make more fiscal sense, as well as more common sense, to extract that extra property tax revenue from billionaires and multi-millionaires, than taking it from working families, middle class beneficiaries and homeowners living on $50,000 or $60,000 per year – grappling with an updated Proposition 58, or Proposition 19. The State Legislature and their friends at the CA Realtors Association attempted a   virulent tax hike with a commercial property  tax hike called Proposition 15… but alas that failed to pass.  In the midst of a Pandemic no less – Proposition 15 would have raised taxes on apt building and office building landlords, commercial shopping center owners and store properties being rented out to hundreds of thousands of commercial tenants all across the state…

As we all know, this would have caused commercial and business property owners to increase rents on their residential and business tenants – which would have, in no time at all, forced store merchants and the like to raise prices on all goods and services, to keep up with their higher rent. Moreover, this would most likely have been the beginning of the final unraveling of the 1978 Proposition 13 tax relief package. The door to worse things to come, so to speak, would have been opened, had it passed… and the keepers of the anti property tax relief community would have marched through.  However, it did not pass.

However, property owners should first study up on the property tax breaks protected by Prop 13 and Proposition 58.  Every property owner and heir or beneficiary inheriting property from parents should be fully aware what is involved with the process that trust beneficiaries and probate heirs have access to, working with a trust lender, through a trust loan working in tandem with Proposition 19, to buyout shares of property inherited by co-beneficiaries; plus establishing a low property tax base, in line with Proposition 13 tax breaks – frequently referred to as a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares, or as realtors call it, “the transfer of property between siblings”, and “sibling-to-sibling property transfer”.

Every homeowner in the United States should know how to buy out beneficiaries’ shares of inherited property; and how a sibling-to-sibling property transfer works; how a loan to an irrevocable trust can help co-beneficiaries get more cash and pay lower taxes than if they were selling their shares of an inherited home to an outside buyer. Everyone who is inheriting property should be familiar with sibling-to-sibling property transfer and how to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting a home, while inheriting property taxes…understanding why the ability to keep parents property taxes, and the right to a property tax transfer under all circumstances, is so crucial to property tax relief in California – namely parent to child transfer and the parent to child exclusion tax break in particular, that must be protected and preserved for the overall good of middle class California.

Only then will beneficiaries and new homeowners fully understand how to keep yearly taxes on property they now own at the low base rate their parents paid, saving thousands of dollars every year, decade after decade.  For those who don’t fully believe all this… they can read up on the facts, at the official Website managed by the CA State Board of Equalization, at or research informative blogs and sites that specialize in property tax relief, in property tax breaks for middle class homeowners – as opposed to the usual tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires.

With some in-depth knowledge of these money-saving tax relief solutions, it’s possible to get the best out of a tax attorney or CPA, property tax consultant and/or tax reduction company, as mentioned above.

The California Proposition 19 Newspaper Debate

California Proposition 19

California Proposition 19


The official California  “Voter Guide” (Official Voter Information Guide) tells us CA Proposition 19 actually protects Proposition 13 property tax savings; and “closes unfair tax loopholes used by wealthy out-of-state investors” — a subtle reference to East Coast investors, of which in reality there are relatively few families like this actually coming to California to inherit property from parents, under Proposition 13, and rent out to wealthy tourists. 

This exaggerated claim has already been dis-proven, yet folks that support Prop 19  and continuously question property tax relief and Proposition 13, continue to repeat this false claim in the media — even though most CA property owners back Prop 13 and Proposition 58.

Newspapers have weighed in recently on Proposition 19: in terms of support…  

• San Mateo Daily Journal: “This would enable people in high cost areas to move more easily, opening up room for new residents to the area.”

• The San Diego Union-Tribune: “While critics see this as a gift to the wealthy elderly, the great majority of older homeowners are middle-income, not rich. Allowing them (as well as disabled homeowners and wildfire or disaster victims) to downsize without suffering a huge property tax hit is a humane policy that helps people retire with much less financial stress. It would also promote fluidity in home sales, increasing the availability of larger homes for families with children and easing the phenomenon of Proposition 13 depressing the real estate free market by trapping empty-nesters in homes bigger than they need.”

And in opposition…

• Tahoe Daily Tribune: “It’s no secret that ballot initiatives can be confusing, but Proposition 19 takes obfuscation to a whole new level.  Voters can’t be blamed if they can’t remember whether Prop. 19 is the initiative that is a massive property tax hike or the measure that actually has something good for homeowners or the initiative that has something to do with firefighting. The fact is, all three are at least somewhat true — especially the part about the big tax increase.”

• Mercury News & East Bay Times Editorial Boards: “Prop. 19 merely plugs one hole in the state’s porous property tax laws while creating another. It’s time for holistic reform that simplifies the system and makes it more equitable. This isn’t it. The longer a person had owned their current home, and already benefited from inordinately low tax bills due to Prop. 13, the greater the tax break on the new property. And those who downsize would often be competing with first-time buyers for more-affordable smaller homes. The real reform would be to abolish the tax-transfer program, not expand it.”

• The Bakersfield Californian Editorial Board: “Proposition 19 is another do-over on the ballot. Two years ago, the real estate industry spent $13 million on a similar initiative campaign to expand the program statewide and enhance the benefit for eligible homeowners. Sixty percent of voters rejected the initiative.”

• Los Angeles Times Editorial Board: “But Proposition 19 would just expand the inequities in California’s property tax system. It would grossly benefit those who were lucky enough to buy a home years ago and hold onto it as values skyrocketed. It would give them a huge tax break and greater buying power in an already expensive real estate market. It would skew tax breaks further away from people who don’t own a home or who may be struggling to buy one.”

• San Francisco Chronicle Editorial Board: “[Proposition 19] is still a flawed package, designed to rev up home sales that benefit real estate agents who could reap more in commissions. It favors one narrow segment of the tax-paying public but does nothing for the rest of the state’s home buyers. The measure shows the convoluted extremes that California’s tangled property tax system produces.”

Whichever way you see it, it’s fairly clear that Proposition 19 is a billion-dollar tax increase on families. It limits one of the best tools parents have to help their children — the right, enshrined in California’s Constitution since 1986, to pass their home and other property on without any increase in property taxes, as a Proposition 19 parent to child transfer.

On the other hand, Proposition 19 still allows residents to avoid property tax reassessment, as long as families move into inherited property inside 12 months, and only as a primary residence. 

California beneficiaries inheriting property from parents can still work with trust lenders to get a loan to a trust you can also get a trust loan to buyout co-beneficiaries, while locking in a low property tax base… You can still easily buyout co-beneficiaries with a transfer of property between siblings.  Beneficiaries can always take advantage of a property tax transfer — in other words, transfer parents’  property taxes to themselves under Prop 19, what used to be Prop 58… and keep parents property taxes after inheriting property, and inheriting property taxes,  for as long as they live in their inherited home… as a standard Proposition 19 parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion from current property tax rates. 

Moreover, Prop 19 will in fact generate additional property tax revenue, that will supposedly be put to good use in the state of California. So, it cuts both ways.

Does the 1978 Proposition 13 & 1986 Prop 58 still Work for Californians?

Does the 1978 Proposition 13 and 1986 Prop 58 still Work for Californians

Does the 1978 Proposition 13 and 1986 Prop 58 still Work for Californians

History Lesson on Property Tax Relief: Support & Opposition

2020 was an extremely motivated time for pent up anti property tax relief movement in California.  The deceptively entitled “2020 Proposition 13” went to voters on March 3, 2020. This tax hike would have increased California’s overall debt; compelling the state’s school districts to issue more debt, raising property tax bills all across the state. It did not pass, and to put it bluntly, was an utter waste of time and taxpayer’s money.

Unlike Proposition 13 passed by voters in 1978, this 2020 version of Proposition 13 would have doubled the debt caps that currently limit how much bond debt local school districts can acquire. The 2020 Proposition 13 caps on local bond debt would have been increased from 1.25% of assessed property value to 2% for elementary and high school districts, and from 2.5% to 4% for school and community college districts.

The extra property tax revenue from 2020 Prop 13 would have gone into pockets not into roads.  The  2020 Proposition 13 tax hike would have cost taxpayers $740 million per year for 35 years. The cash mainly going to construction-worker unions and contractors that hire everyone, with priority spending going to people working on projects in districts that have signed labor agreements that those in  power prefer.  As we know, the so-called 2020 Proposition 13 failed.

Prop 15 and the Near End of Commercial Property Tax Relief     

Even more dangerous for California, the 2020 Proposition 15 tax hike that was proposed to voters across all 58 counties would have removed the right for commercial property owners to avoid property tax reassessment.  This would have raised property taxes on all commercial and business property owners, which would have raised commercial store rents, office and apt. rentals, rentals on all business tenants would have gone up.  This would in turn have increased prices on all goods and services throughout the state of California.   Considering the outcome on middle class residents and working families, it would not have been a pretty picture.

Supporters of the Proposition 15 campaign raised over $67.6 million mostly from foundations and public service unions. The top three contributors were the Chan Zuckerburg Initiative, California Teachers Association, and SEIU California. Supporters say Prop 15 is a broad coalition of 1600 organizations launched by civil rights organizations, housing groups, parents, teachers, nurses, firefighters and community-based organizations who advocate for equality and justice for communities of color

Opposition to Proposition 15 Campaign has raised over $73.1 million mostly from land developers, agricultural interests and golf and country clubs. The largest donor is the California Business Roundtable Issues PAC that has contributed more than $38 million to the No on 15 Campaign.  The Business Roundtable’s biggest donors are New York-based Blackstone Property Partners who gave $7 million and Michael Hayde, CEO of the Irvine real estate investment firm Western National Group, who gave $4.5 million.

Despite the massive effort towards promoting and passing this tax hike, voters were not sufficiently confused or conned into backing the bill en mass… and they rejected this tax increase on commercial properties, supposedly depriving the California school system of what allegedly could be a significant source of consistent revenue.  Although the true intended recipients of this extra commercial property tax revenue remained under questions… and backers of Proposition 15 – the first major effort to cut into beloved property tax relief afforded by Proposition 13 since it was voted into law in 1978 – finally conceded defeat, and California heaved a statewide sigh of unified relief. 

The question remains – would economic collapse of the statewide   consumer base and working family structure in California have been worth a few extra dollars for the educational system, which is doing relatively well as is?

Last Minute Promotion of Snake Oil Sales to California Voters

Motivated, determined and relentless opponents to property tax relief in California came up with a last minute tax hike measure, Proposition 19 – and the CA Association of Realtors shoved $35 Million at the CA Legislature to promote this unusually deceptive bill, after suffering significant tax hike losses.  They managed to confuse enough voters with disingenuous and deceptive public relations to get Proposition 19 passed – by a hair – and watered down the critical Proposition 58 “parent-to-child exclusion” tax break for middle class beneficiaries and new homeowners. 

This weakened California homeowners’ ability to avoid property tax reassessment without obstacles. So Proposition 19 managed to limit parent to child transfer rights to a one-year window, and only as a primary residence.  No longer could investment properties avoid property tax reassessment.

So the ability to transfer parents property taxes, when inheriting property taxes from a parent, is now on a tighter path. We can still keep parents property taxes but they made it more challenging, in the midst of a Pandemic no less.  Avoiding property tax reassessment and establishing a low property tax base; as well as buying out a sibling’s share of inherited property, meaning the transfer of property between siblings or sibling-to-sibling property transfer – still exists, yet with a few more obstacles to remain aware of. 

We can still transfer parents property taxes in California when  inheriting property and inheriting property taxes from a parent, and remain able to keep parents property taxes on any property tax transfer, such as the parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion.  It’s just not quite as simple or easy as it was prior to advent of Proposition 19.

Thankfully, enough property tax breaks survived in California to enable property owners to still save significantly on property taxes. Californians can still get a trust loan from a trust lender, working alongside Proposition 58, to buyout a co-beneficiary when inheriting property taxes from a parent – and, most importantly, to establish a low Proposition 13 level property tax base, basically forever for an inherited home, for example from a niche firm like Commercial Loan Corp.  

Most Californians struggling financially from Pandemic shutdowns and health outcomes should research niche blogs like this one, or   info sites like EdSource.org who looks  at both sides of Proposition 15 for example, or SiliconValleyandBeyond.com who examines property taxes and Proposition 19, among other related issues. As well as state government websites such as the  California State Board of Equalization.  The more we know about how to use trust loans and these unique tax breaks, plus other property tax reduction solutions we have access to, the better off we’ll all be going forward.

Transferring Your Mom’s Low Property Tax Base Via Prop 19

Transferring A Parents Low Property Tax Base with California Prop 19

Transferring A Parents Low Property Tax Base with California Proposition 19

It’s certainly nice and politically correct of the California Governor to let resident companies and families pay property taxes a few weeks late;   with millions of people unemployed or under-employed — with mouths to feed and bills to pay.  Politically correct, with nice optics… But not terribly effective, let’s face it.

How about just not collecting property taxes as long as the pandemic is literally killing our economy. How about something with a material, profound affect, not just nibbling weakly around the edges.  However, California still has more property tax relief options than any other state in the union, for middle class homeowners.  Wealthy residents  have countless tax cuts and property tax breaks.

At any rate, the country is moving rapidly towards a vaccine. Fine. But if the Governor of California and his team really want to move the needle for middle class residents, and genuinely help working families survive the disastrous pandemic economic effect — why don’t they update and bolster the benefits offered by Proposition 19, which is already in place?  No need to re-invent anything to move this to the next level! 

As the pandemic continues to diminish the California economy — the powerful realtor community and the State Legislature are promoting status quo — not really digging in and trying hard to  upgrade and improve the property tax breaks that are already in place.  They seem to have no appetite at all to make  the lives of millions of middle class homeowners more secure — with hope for better days in the future.  They seem instead to be far more interested in making the realtor community and the Legislature more secure, more comfortable, and a great deal wealthier regardless of the fact that these partisan groups are already swimming in money! 

However, despite the Legislature’s indifference to the financial problems of the middle class, Californians still have property tax relief options such as the right to keep parents property taxes, and transfer parents property taxes upon inheriting property and inheriting property taxes at a low base rate, as per Proposition 58 which is really now Proposition 19… Plus of course Prop 13 — but the walls may close in on us fast if we allow the powers that be to return with anything like the infamous commercial property tax Proposition 15; which would have increased prices across the state on virtually all goods and services… cutting deep into the middle class spending and tax paying machine that basically keeps the state economy alive. 

Many of these middle class residents stay up to date on  their property tax options, with websites such as the official California State Board of Equalization site.  As well as by researching inheritance solutions and property tax relief on property tax blogs like this one, Property Tax News;  plus going to websites addressing Prop 13 and maintaining a low property tax base… basic property tax breaks that allow resident to spend less and save more, like Trust and Estate Loans, and crucial updated information and news on Proposition 19 at the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.  

Residents  these days also look seriously at options  and solutions to property devalued by the affects of the pandemic… going to websites like Michael Wyatt Consulting for help.  In fact, Mr. Wyatt speaks to this on his website in a very direct way.  He says:

The Covid-19 / Coronavirus pandemic has severely impacted the commercial and investment real estate markets in California. This has placed a significant burden on many property owners. The good news is, property tax relief is now available.  One of the property tax relief measures available is for when “restricted access” to properties causes a loss of market value of those properties. The other is reductions in value due to damage, destruction, depreciation, obsolescence, removal of property, or “other factors causing a decline in value“.  An effective method of supporting lost value due to restricted access or damage to a property, is to measure the loss of  revenue  from periods before and after the event causing the decline of the property’s performance.

New homeowners in California also research property tax breaks at  established finance firms that are focused on options that involve Proposition 58, and now Proposition 19, maintaining a low property tax base through a loan to an irrevocable trust, such as critical financing options for California residents furnished by Commercial Loan Corp — again, working hand-in-hand with Proposition 58 having morphed into Proposition 19 for all intensive purposes.   For  all commercial and residential property owners; enabling beneficiaries and homeowners to lock in a secure, low Proposition 13 property tax base, while buying out co-beneficiaries that have inherited the same property, yet are committed to selling their property shares — and who ultimately walk away with far more money in their pocket from irrevocable trust funding, rather than simply accepting cash from a third party buyer!

Property tax options that involve going through a trust loan are important to tax attorneys and sophisticated beneficiaries, as these specific property tax options are always more profitable; as well as maintaining a low property tax base with a property tax transfer, basically for the life of the property, with a standard parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion from paying reassessed property taxes; as long as requirements for Proposition 58 — now Proposition 19 — have been met.

We so have effective options to turn to in California… So we shouldn’t complain too much even though new property tax relief changes have created some challenges.  We also have a lot to be thankful for.

If you are curious how much you might be able to save by taking advantage of California Proposition 19 or Proposition 58, fill out the short form located here for a free estimate. 

Part Two: Proposition 19 Forces Changes to Prop 58 While Proposition 13 Remains Intact

A certain Proposition 15 was promoted with millions of dollars behind it, yet it didn’t pass. However, the fact that the California Legislature was in favor of it is still troubling to many California homeowners. 

Proposition 15 would have removed commercial properties like office buildings and industrial parks from Proposition 13 protections, mainly the ability to avoid property tax reassessment from current tax rates… Inheriting business properties from a parent would, under Prop 15, no longer have provided  business property heirs with Proposition 13 tax breaks – so heirs can avoid property tax reassessment for inherited commercial properties. 

Inheriting property taxes at a low Proposition 13 base would no longer apply to beneficiaries inheriting commercial property.  Beneficiaries inheriting office buildings and other business facilities would no longer have been able to transfer parents property taxes.

It would have raised the rents on apt. buildings and office buildings, on all commercial tenants, affecting stores and malls, supermarkets, car dealers, pharmacies and you name it. Effectively raising the prices of all goods and services in California. An economic disaster in the making. Fortunately, it did not pass.

As a well known realtor in Santa Barbara pointed out recently in an interview, Estate-planning attorneys are going to be very busy now, as Proposition 19 may cause many family members to decide to sell property they had intended to pass on to their heirs. Although other siblings will decide to keep and move into a home inherited from parents – as a primary residence – so heirs can avoid property tax reassessment  It’s a game-changer….

In terms of properties being sold that would have been passed on through a family trust, or to beneficiaries who simply cannot afford to pay property taxes that are reassessed are current rates… or folks that just object to paying higher property taxes on principle. Realtors are going to make a lot of money like this. And that’s good for them and possibly good for California. The problem is, a lot of those folks selling their home in response to high income tax exacerbated by    inflated living expenses, are also moving out of the state permanently – if they are also unable to save thousands of dollars every year for emergencies or their retirement account – by avoiding property tax reassessment.  And that’s not good for California!”    

Higher property taxes or not, California will always be an attractive place to live, to start a family, or just because the weather and the sights are pleasant.  People are always going to want to live in California, but long-term residents see life getting more expensive in that state – more rapidly than anyone anticipated.

Moreover, the prospect of getting more and more squeezed by taxes is forcing both large and mid-sized companies, as well as a surprising number of people approaching retirement, soon to be on a fixed income, to move to other states that are far more income-tax, corporate-tax and property tax friendly – and the companies take their jobs with them!

A good number of residents in their 20s (just out of college) are choosing to leave the state, with no intention to return.  In contrast to recent years, when California was an extremely popular state for young homeowners… and people in their 30s and even 40s, looking to start a family. Now, many young adults and families are seeking the most affordable place to live following college, or just as their careers are taking off – frequently with very young children to think about.

And this is where the CA Legislature’s short-sightedness really becomes obvious… Point being,  what else leaves the state with all those young residents and tax conscious companies? The large amount of taxes they pay to California every year!