CA Proposition 58 and Prop 193 Exclusions

Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer in California

Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer in California

Based on their recent efforts, how do the folks running the state of California, in the Legislature, think that adding property taxes will affect all these working families? Do they even consider how further unraveling property tax relief would affect the California economy as a whole? Does it ever occur to the politicos in the Legislature that going further in the direction of eliminating property tax breaks would literally be a social and financial disaster for the state as a whole?

Since Proposition 58 (as well as Proposition 193 concerning the “Grandparent to Grandchild Exclusion”) is such a critical element holding up property tax relief in the state of California, we might as well take a quick, very simple high-level look at how this all works. To take advantage of Prop 58, certain eligibility requirements must be met. For example, eligible children under this proposition include:

a) Children born of the parents in question
b) Stepchildren
c) Sons-in-law and daughters-in-law
d) Children adopted under the age of 18
e) Children of a child of grandparents (regarding Proposition 193)

Propositions 58 and 193 exclude three types of property transfers, avoiding property tax reassessment at current high market rates:

1. Transfer of a primary residence: The assessed value of a primary residence is eligible for reassessment exclusion, or exemption.

2. Transfer of property through gift, sale, or inheritance: Parent-to-child transfer through a trust will qualify for an exclusion of property tax reassessment.

3. The parent-child exclusion can only be used if the “transferee child” uses the home as the child’s primary residence, and files for the homeowner’s exemption for the property. The parent-child exclusion will not be available if the home is used as a vacation home or is rented out by the children. If the home is transferred to more than one child, they would all have to live together in the home as their primary.

4. A parent can only shelter $1 million of increased value from reassessment. Any appreciation above that will be added to the property tax assessed For instance, if the primary residence is currently assessed at $500,000 but is worth $1,500,000, the child receiving the home and using it as the child’s primary residence will keep the same property tax assessed value of $500,000. However, if the home is worth $3,000,000 and not $1,500,000, the $2,500,000 appreciation will result in an added $1,500,000 assessment; the child’s new property tax assessed value will be $2,000,000 ($500,000 current property tax assessed value + $1,500,000 of “excess appreciation”). This new limitation also applies to a family farm.

Proposition 19 eliminates the second current alternative completely. As of Feb 15, 2021, there will no longer be a Parent to Child exclusion for a transfer of any property other than the parent’s primary residence and a family farm. Although you can still get the benefit of Prop 58 and an irrevocable trust loan if you require that type of financing.

Proposition 58 does not automatically apply to each parent-to-child transfer. To receive the full benefit of Proposition 58, you are required to file within 3-years of the transfer of property ownership.

There are several forms you must file to take advantage of property tax reassessment exclusion. They are Proposition 58 Form BOE-58-AH: Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer Between Parent and Child; or Proposition 193. Form BOE-58-G: Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer Between Grandparent and Grandchild.

This completes a very simple, high-level view of what Proposition 58 is all about. Once you understand all that, the next step is to enlist the help of a trust lender to get approved to be able to take advantage of Prop 58 and an irrevocable trust loan for funding to equalize the finances between beneficiaries if some wish to hold on to inherited property while others are looking to sell out to outside buyers.

From that point onward, the next step is to make use of the trust fund loan process, if you wish to equalize financing between you and your siblings or co-beneficiaries, to retain inherited property from your parents and buyout property shares inherited by a sibling, or several co-beneficiaries. You can then own your inherited home without the encumbrances of co-beneficiaries to be concerned with.

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

How Can I Inherit a Home & Keep the Low Property Tax Base?

Perhaps a lot of regular middle class folks out there waiting for an inheritance aren’t aware of it – but since 2016 many of us in the business of dealing with middle class heirs, waiting for an inheritance in trust or in an estate, involved in an unusually large number of conflicts between heirs or beneficiaries… Frequently turning ugly and downright out of control. 

As you can guess, these conflicts typically revolve around the subject of money… Frequently, in an estate scenario, one or more siblings insist on selling the home they have inherited from Mom or Dad, to generate “fast cash” – often in heated opposition to co-beneficiaries inheriting the same home, for example, who insist on retaining that property, as the emotional or sentimental value for them far exceeds the cash value. 

Hence, this often fires up a serious conflict within the family group.  Or – one or two heirs claim they should be receiving a much larger percentage of the family inheritance, which is frequently based on the sale of inherited property, as cash assets are often very modest in middle class estates these days.

Over the past four or five years, we can clearly see a significant increase in these family squabbles… often, for example, in 17 out of 20 estate or trust situations we often see in-fighting like this, that frequently destroys sibling relationships.  Or perhaps conflicts over the issue “to sell or not to sell” inherited family property, or even conflicts over the assessed value of that property… is merely the match that ignites emotional conflicts that were there under the surface to begin with.  It’s no surprise that we often see at least one or two inheritors, per estate or trust, that want  to keep their inherited home, with one or two, or more, beneficiaries pushing to sell the house as soon as possible. 

It’s very common these days to see siblings lock horns almost immediately, when the subject of selling their inherited home is raised. With additional battles flaring up over who should be receiving the larger share of cash assets – or “who” gets “what”  percentage of the home the family is inheriting.  home left by a beloved parent.  We see this pattern repeated over and over again; the same words, similar disputes and similar claims.

A Trust Loan Solution to Family Conflicts

In California, Prop 58 loans to irrevocable trusts often act as a solution to many family conflicts revolving around sibling disagreements over whether or not the family should  retain or sell inherited property from parents.  With a trust loan working in conjunction with Proposition 58 – a process referred to as Prop 58 loans to irrevocable trusts – you can then buyout  beneficiaries    and  end up owning  your inherited property by yourself.

Interestingly enough, siblings who insisted on selling out actually end up receiving more cash then if there had been no trust loan funded and outside buyers had become involved; so those siblings can move forward with their lives, leaving you in peace. Interestingly enough, most families that call  a trust lender to get this type of funding started and accomplished, know next to nothing about the process of Prop 58 loans to irrevocable trusts. 

Residential and commercial property owners should research and learn all about the benefits provided by trust lenders furnishing loans to irrevocable trusts to enable the buyout of property shares from sibling co-beneficiaries; along with CA Proposition 13 transfer of property, plus locking in a low property tax base rate in conjunction with Proposition 58 – all associated with a transfer of parents’ property and transfer of parents property taxes.

Homeowners in every state should understand what inheriting property taxes is all about, how to keep parents property taxes with property tax transfer of all sorts – and why parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion, is so profoundly important at the base root of property tax relief in California… and hopefully in other states as well, if motivated folks begin sending letters and emails to their representatives in Washington, and if, by a miracle, this catches on and actually sprouts results. 

Living in a state with low property taxes can provide a major benefit, rather than a liability, to your life. Even if many homes are pricey perhaps to begin with… lowering property taxes on them, to a number you can really feel, can have a profound affect on your lifestyle, and maintain the quality of your life, to where you need it to be.

Goods and services and real estate can be pricey in states like Connecticut, Texas, California, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts… these are all expensive states, in terms of day to day living… However, getting a “life-toll” such as property taxes down to a manageable level can change your entire outlook on your life, eliminating that particular financial struggle.

Moreover, the concept of paying yearly taxes on something you purchase and then keep for many years, might be flawed to begin with. What other large purchase you may make continues to charge you fees such as taxes, after the initial [large] purchase? A boat? Plane? Car? Motorcycle? None. Only real property. Perhaps the whole concept of taxing real estate after the initial purchase could use some fresh, new examination.

Speaking of trust liquidation, California is still the only state in America where you can avoid property tax reassessment at current rates; capped at 2% taxation basically as long as you own property inherited from parents initially… thanks to the 1978 CA Proposition 13.  Plus, the component involving Prop 58 and  “trust liquidity” is particularly  popular with middle class beneficiaries who want to sell the property shares they have inherited from a parent, and walk off with even more cash than if they had sold out to an outside buyer.  Conversely,  Proposition 58 trust loans are just as popular with members of families inheriting property from parents, who wish to buyout their siblings, co-beneficiaries, that are looking to sell their inherited shares.

California business and residential property owners, in addition to having the right to keep parents property taxes, and transfer parents property taxes upon inheriting property, and then inheriting property taxes at the low Prop 13 two-percent tax rate maximum – can maintain a parental property tax transfer basically forever, as a Parent-to-Child Transfer, or Parent-to-Child Exclusion, as long as all requirements for Proposition 58 have been met. Californians can even apply for the same tax break on a secondary property inherited from parents.

If you’re a California property owner who is looking to buyout siblings who insist on selling their inherited property, while retaining the same inherited property from parents with a trust loan, avoiding property tax reassessment from that point on – you can find content that covers this in-depth, along with information on how to get approved for Proposition 58, on a state government Website like the California State Board of Equalization, which is found at  https://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/faqs/propositions58.htm  

A lot of folks research these issues and delve more deeply into California property tax relief, on multiple levels, at established niche  Websites such as Commercial Loan Corp…  or a free resource blog like this one, Property Tax Transfer.  Trust loans working in accord with Proposition 58 or Prop 193 make it possible for heirs and beneficiaries to sell shares of inherited property, a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares, or as realtors put it, “the transfer of property between siblings”, and “lending money to an irrevocable trust“ – typically from an irrevocable trust loan lender.

The fact is, we need to understand all about our rights, with respect to using a 6-figure loan to an irrevocable trust — not only as a way to buyout co-beneficiaries, but also as a tax break that locks in a low property tax base in line with CA Proposition 13 parental property tax transfer. 

Every property owner in every state in America should be more familiar with current changes to property tax relief laws in California; including the pesky little details that support the invaluable system that allows homeowners and commercial property owners to buy out co-beneficiaries’ mutually inherited property — focusing on the tax laws that makes sibling-to-sibling property transfers work in California.  Someday, perhaps in every state in America, if we want to make property taxes fair and equal to all property owners in this country.

How Does the Prop 58’s Parent to Child Exclusion Work?

California Parent to Child Property Tax Exclusion

California Parent to Child Property Tax Exclusion

Importance of Retaining Proposition 58 & Property Tax Relief

Regardless of what critics of Proposition 58 and Prop 13 have to say in Op-Eds and Editorials in California newspapers… No matter how many times opponents of California property tax relief attempt to completely unravel and decimate invaluable property tax breaks protected by Prop 13 and Prop 58, during a Coronavirus pandemic no less – popular support for property tax relief in California holds… For commercial property owners and homeowners alike.

Despite a win here and there by opponents to property tax relief in California… supporters of watering down critical tax breaks such as the “Parent to Child Exclusion” win a battle here or there chiefly as a result of tricky, deceptive marketing; with slippery snake oil tax measures like Proposition 19 in 2020.

We just narrowly missed a statewide disaster, with the proposed property tax measure Proposition 15 almost passing, which would have resulted in egregious property tax hikes, raising taxes on apt building and office building landlords, commercial shopping center owners and store properties being rented out to hundreds of thousands of commercial tenants all across the state.  

This would have forced commercial and business property owners in all 58 counties in California to raise prices on all goods and services – simply to survive.  Moreover, this would have been the beginning of the final unraveling of the 1978 Proposition 13 tax relief package. The door to worse things to come, so to speak, would have been opened.  Fortunately, the door was closed.  At least for now.

The fact is, if Proposition 15 had passed in Nov. of 2020 everything you buy or rent in the state of California, even online, would have gone sky high.  So, clearly, this was a near miss of a total statewide economic melt-down. As it happens, the other deceptive property tax promoted in 2020, sponsored by the CA Legislature and the California Association of Realtors among others, Proposition 19, did in fact pass.  The lesser of two evils, so to speak.

Although not perfect, there is still enough room within the property tax system in California so beneficiaries inheriting property from parents, and homeowners, can still make good use of Prop 13, of Proposition 58 and the “Parent to Child Exclusion”…  Beneficiaries can still take advantage of trust loans and the ability to buyout co-beneficiaries if they wish to sell off their inherited ownership in inherited property… plus lock down a low Proposition 13 property tax base.  So Proposition 13 remains, for the moment, troubled… but intact.

The right to avoid property tax reassessment is crucial for California’s economic well being. It means beneficiaries can still make use of Prop 58 and irrevocable trust loans to buyout co-beneficiaries wanting to sell off inherited property.  It means residents can inherit and keep parents property taxes, and can transfer parents property taxes. Inheriting property taxes from parents at a low base rate is critical for middle class homeowners. Otherwise, selling off inherited property becomes unavoidable and inevitable.

Middle class heirs, new home owners, frequently are not able to pay current market-value property tax rates – in a hyper expensive state… in the midst of an out-of-control pandemic, where nearly 7 million people in this state are out of work or under-employed, or are still working from home at a 50% salary level.  Not to mention the astronomical costs associated with illness and the loss of life, for family members.  Items that healthcare insurance refuses to pay for.

The folks supporting the realtor community, CA Association of Realtors, politicians running the State Legislature, and organizations such as the California NAACP State Conference, California Senior Advocates League, California Statewide Law Enforcement Association, Californians for Disability Rights, and the Congress of California Seniors simply must begin to look at middle class families and working family life more realistically.  You’d think they would be,  however they apparently did not read the fine print, and were hoodwinked into voting for Prop 19 in Nov of 2020.

By simple good luck homeowners and beneficiaries can still make use of Prop 58 and a trust loan process to buyout inherited property from siblings while locking down a low Proposition 13 protected property tax base.  Had those organizations read the fine print, they would have noticed that certain tax relief protections they took for granted were under direct attack – such as the ability for eligible homeowners to transfer their tax assessments within counties and to homes of equal or lesser market value;  To retain the right for folks age 55 and older, or people with disabilities, to keep the same number of times they are able to transfer their tax assessments;  To be able to transfer tax assessments on inherited homes, including inherited properties not used as primary residences, to be transferred from parent-to-child or grandparent-to-grandchild – without any issues or problems.

California still retains Proposition 13 property tax breaks, and  beneficiaries can still make use of Prop 58 and trust loan funding.  However, had Proposition 15 been successful, and had the Proposition 19 people gotten everything they had wanted – loading all these new proposed property taxes on top of regular working people would have had an extremely negative affect on the majority of the population of California.

Based on their recent efforts, how do the folks running the state of California, in the Legislature, think that adding the property taxes they had wanted to add would affect all these working families? Do they even consider how further unraveling property tax relief would affect the California economy as a whole?

Does it ever occur to the politicos in the Legislature that going further in the direction of eliminating property tax breaks, as they would like to do, would literally be a social and financial disaster for the state as a whole?

The Governor and his friends need to give this some serious thought.

 

Proposition 58’s Parent to Child Exclusion in 2021

Proposition 58's Parent to Child Exclusion in 2021

Proposition 58’s Parent to Child Exclusion in 2021

It is both crucial and about time for homeowners and commercial property owners in California to step back and take little time to read up on property tax breaks available in all 58 counties in the state – to fully understand exactly how property tax relief works now; how it’s still possible to transfer your current tax-basis to children or grandchildren. With the Proposition 19 property tax measure having revised crucial Proposition 58 property tax relief protections; in place since 1986.

It’s critical for property owners, no matter what their total property value or net worth is, to:

a) take full advantage of property tax relief as it is in 2021 going forward;

b) make sure the changes to Prop 58 “Parent to Child Exclusion” are well understood… that property inherited from a parent is either moved into as a primary residence, within 12-months after the remaining parent passes;

c) make sure they plan on selling their inherited property at a  break-even price or at a profit, if they are not able to move in as a primary residence within 12-months;

d)  insure that, if selling out to an outside buyer is not a preferred option, they understand how to enlist the help of a seasoned trust lender, such as the Commercial Loan Corp in Newport Beach… to get approved for Proposition 58, and to be able to take full advantage of loan funding to an irrevocable trust – used in conjunction with Prop 58 – in order to buyout property ownership from a co-beneficiary, or several siblings, waiting to inherit the same inherited home.

All of this entails learning how to operate successfully under the auspices of CA Proposition 19, passed in Nov of 2020; affecting property tax relief benefits that have been taken for granted by Californians since 1986, and if you factor in key property tax breaks from Proposition 13, having the right to property tax transfer, to avoid property tax reassessment to attain and keep a low property tax  base – since 1978.

It is also important to acknowledge that the majority of “Parent to Child Property Transfers” occur after both parents are gone; and to fully understand how Proposition 58 helps regular middle class homeowners and business property owners in the state of California, and not fall prey to conspiracy theories that claim property tax relief is only for the wealthy. 

The date of passing of the last (surviving) parent is used as the date of transfer for beneficiaries (offspring, or “children”, typically grown children of decedents leaving property to their heirs or beneficiaries).

The average trust beneficiary takes roughly a year and a half to settle an estate after a lone surviving parent passes away, leaving liquid assets and/or real property to heirs or beneficiaries. It is also important to remember that during this time the children of decedents are responsible for continuing to pay the property taxes on their parent’s home and any other property in question. 

Under California law, Proposition 58, Proposition 193 and Proposition 13 (which may also be combined with Proposition 60 and Proposition 90) allows  a parent or grandparent to transfer their current tax-basis to their children or grandchildren. You can still transfer your current tax-basis to heirs in California, it’s just not as ‘free and easy’ as it has been. These benefits can still apply to a gift, a sale, an inheritance, or a hybrid of these property transfers.

More specifically, Proposition 58 and Proposition 193 allow a parent or grandparent to gift or sell their real property during their lifetime, or gift their property at death, to their child or grandchild, and concurrently transfer their Proposition 13 tax basis, and other Proposition 13 benefits, along with the property, thus saving the child or grandchild potentially thousands of dollars per year for as long as they own the property. So not only can you transfer your current tax-basis to beneficiaries,  your beneficiaries who are inheriting property  are also allowed to combine benefits provided by Proposition 58 with a loan to an irrevocable trust, to buyout inherited property shares from siblings who are co-beneficiaries.

Prop 19 was promoted as a way to: “Increase funds for firefighters and wildfire containment programs; to eliminate unfair tax loopholes used by East Coast investors, celebrities, wealthy non-California residents, and trust fund heirs…” again, citing conspiracy theories publicized by critics of property tax relief in California. 

Looking at this legislation in-depth reveals that it also eliminates property tax increase protections for many more California property owners. “East Coast Investors” is a thinly disguised euphemism suggesting that it’s not really about your right to transfer your current tax-basis — it’s about thousands of voracious outside investors “gobbling up properties” on the beach or wherever, and renting them out at egregious prices to rich visitors and vacationers.

Not so. In fact, these property tax measures would affect mostly local residents inheriting property from their parents, not families from nearby states – as critics of property tax relief are claiming – with no evidence whatsoever to back up their claims. No evidence and no proof… simply free-floating conjecture.

California Proposition 58 & Proposition 19 Lenders

California Proposition 58 and Proposition 19 Lenders

California Proposition 58 and Proposition 19 Lenders

We all know it’s a period of time right now in America of great uncertainty, insecurity and stress… affecting many families, creating enormous tensions, frequently financial…  Even affecting family estates, when a parent passes away; and where ‘will contests’ can be a real problem for families – for example, sibling-A believing she/he should be getting more than sibling-B;  so on and so forth.  We see a lot more of this sort of family conflict lately, over the past few  years, than ever before.

Although we do, thankfully, have solutions in California to prevent such conflicts from descending into disaster. Some of these solutions are tied into getting approved for CA Proposition 58 so heirs can avoid property tax reassessment; as well as classic CA Proposition 13 property tax breaks, for California property owners looking to work around new Proposition 19 property tax obstacles that force homeowners to move into inherited property within one year or lose their “Parent to Child Exclusion”. This can be a stunning loss of property tax relief; unless we meet it head on, and are able to  successfully work around it. 

It seems it’s still possible to take advantage of the property tax transfer benefit from parents, with the ability to keep parents property taxes while avoiding property tax reassessment of course. Despite newly passed obstacles, we can still transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property – bottom line, inheriting parents property taxes at a low base rate the way Proposition 13 was intended!  

Firms like Commercial Loan Corp can help solve estate conflicts between beneficiaries; making it possible for us to buyout siblings with a “sibling to sibling property transfer”, siblings who want to sell their inherited property shares, while allowing us to keep the same mutually inherited property from parents – with a trust loan, at that low base rate.  As long as we get approved for Proposition  58, heirs can avoid property tax reassessment, as the California State Board of Equalization explains.  Or possibly at a niche property tax info blog like this one, Property Tax Transfer

As long as everyone gets the cash they were expecting with a trust loan, and/or end up with a nice low property tax base… everyone ends up in a win-win happy sibling scenario. As long as the ‘will contest’ can be resolved to some degree, and direct communications between siblings doesn’t completely fall part.

These conflicts have often dominated family structures, so much so that some family groups actually splinter apart… with some family members literally leaving California for ever.  Additionally, Southern California home prices are currently at record levels, which doesn’t help. 

Because of hyper expensive home pricing many people are moving from California to nearby states where cheaper real estate can be found, in decent middle class or lower middle class neighborhoods; including Texas, Nevada, Arizona, and in some cases Oregon and Washington, according to Jordan Levine, an economist at the CA Association of Realtors (C.A.R.), who says California residents leave to get out from under general California inflation and an increasingly expensive overall lifestyle that many middle class families simply cannot afford to sustain – in terms of buying a home, feeding a family, maintaining numerous cars and insurance plans, health coverage expenses; schools; you name it. 

It is ironic that C.A.R. (California Association of Realtors) produces a report describing elevated living expenses in the state of California, while they are in fact the chief sponsor supporting the recent Proposition 19 property tax measure, watering down  property tax relief for California home owners… contributing to the higher cost of living in the state… Obstructing the way heirs can avoid property tax reassessment by unraveling the “Parent to Child Exclusion” or Parent-to-Child Exemption, as realtors like to call it.

As a matter of fact, this past August, the median home price in California was up more than 12% from a year earlier, according to CoreLogic/DQNews. Experts say the median home price is being impacted by an increase in luxury homes along with the flexibility of remote working options, which also allows people to move away from places like Los Angeles or San Francisco, to nearby states, in rural areas where families can get more space and amenities for far less cost than in many populated areas in California.

California real estate is often significantly more expensive than other, nearby, states. But then again, so is property in states like New York, or Chicago, in Oregon,  Maryland or Massachusetts. However. At least in California, homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting property have been fortunate enough to have property tax breaks at their disposal since 1978 such as Proposition 13, maintaining a low property tax cap of 1% to 2 % max.

Moreover, since 1986 Proposition 58 has positively impacted property transfers and naturally property tax transfer, avoiding property tax reassessment on inherited property while inheriting property taxes from parents.  This  has actually saved homeowners in California tens of thousands of dollars over the years.  Hundreds of thousands, literally, over decades.

In fact, thanks to Proposition 58, trust loan based estate funding transactions save beneficiaries $6,000 to $8,000 or more on average, per family, every year.  No, it’s not millions… But for a regular middle class family it is definitely significant.   And if homeowners can’t access this type of benefit, it will hurt them financially year after year.

So even if we can buy a house more cheaply in a relatively inexpensive state like Ohio, or Idaho, South Dakota, North Carolina, or Wisconsin, for example… All comparatively less pricey than average property in many areas in California — we end up spending more anyway every year in property taxes in those other states. So we end up spending more every year anyway.

Property tax transfer, known as a parent to child transfer or parent to child exemption, will always be low, at 2% or less – if we continue to be able to avoid property tax reassessment.  With new property tax laws in place, if we miss that 12-month deadline to move into inherited property – then we’re right back in the financial vice known as “current market value”…

And, bless the California politicos who negotiated for us against the Legislature to at least retain enough of Proposition 58 so as long as we do get in under the wire, within that first 12-months after our decedent passes away… with 6-figure trust loan approval, we can, as beneficiaries, buy out co-beneficiaries’ shares of inherited property, which realtors call “sibling to sibling property transfer”, or ”transfer of property between siblings” and end up owning our own property anyway, without the problem of sharing real estate with siblings we’d rather not own property with.

Thankfully, although the timeline has now become more challenging, we can, as California inheritors and homeowners, still take advantage of tax breaks made possible by Proposition 58 and Proposition 13, in concert with an irrevocable trust — and buyout siblings,  so we can take over our own home at a nice low property tax base, more or less equivalent to the tax base enjoyed by our parents. Property tax relief in California may be a bit rocky right now… but it’s still there, if we use it carefully and judiciously.  And keep both eyes on that calendar!

Loans for Irrevocable Trusts

Loans for homes in an irrevocable trust

Loans for homes in an irrevocable trust

According to financial leaders who own firms that provide loans for irrevocable trusts and property tax relief programs, in concert with Proposition 58, Prop 193, and Proposition 13 – typically saving  homeowners over $8,500 in extra taxes every year – the news is that property owners in California should consider accomplishing any property transfers to heirs, that may be planned either as a sale, a gift or an inheritance, or a hybrid – prior to or by Feb. 15, 2021…

Feb. 15th being the final day one can access original Proposition 58 or Prop 193 property tax break benefits – to save money on the initial transfer, plus thousands of dollars on yearly property taxes, as the tax assessor comes around to collect, so to speak.  

To reiterate, as you probably already know, Proposition 58 allows parents in California to transfer property to their children without triggering a property tax reassessment. And as you most likely are aware, you must be the son or daughter of a parent that resides, and owns property, in California – in order to qualify for a “parent to child exclusion” (also referred to as a parent to child exemption) – from reassessment, in terms of the current market value of family owned real property.

Conversely, Proposition 193 allows grandparents to transfer property to their grandchildren, with a “grandparent to grandchild exemption” – without having to worry about current market property tax reassessment.  It’s worth noting that the Proposition 193 exclusion is workable only if the Proposition 58 exemption cannot be used.  In other words, to put it bluntly, parents of the grandchildren in question must be deceased.  That may sound harsh, however it is important to know the facts.

To be safe and secure, experts are telling us right now to be aware of certain changes to the Proposition 58 “parent to child exclusion” tax break – and to remain aware of time as a serious factor. We are told that we should view Feb. 15, 2021 as a formal deadline for completing a family property transfer or intra-family trust for a trust loan – not for paperwork signatures, or a postmark date. With potential county closures mounting up, the completion of this sort of transaction in person could very well continue to be a challenge, and backlogs affecting paperwork sent through the mail could be an issue at some point.  

As of February 16, 2021, family property transfers must be used as a primary residence, to avoid property tax reassessment at current market value; maintaining the invaluable right to avoid property tax reassessment.  Fortunately, Californians will still be able to take advantage of a property tax break as long as they are using inherited property as a primary residence, within a year of the passing of the decedent who is leaving the property to his or her children; typically as an inheritance.    

However, we do need to be aware that it is the next generation of property owners, in the future, that may incur higher property taxes due to new tax laws, or shall we say a revised version of the same   property tax break protected by CA Proposition 58.  The point being, with new changes to property tax law in California, with the right to avoid property tax reassessment being challenged and even partially unraveled, it has  become more important than ever to consult or work with Prop 58 and property tax relief experts that are knowledgeable in all trust loan, Proposition 58 and Proposition 13 matters… who maintain a grasp of property tax law changes, and how those shifts impact beneficiaries and property owners in the state of California.    

Home ownership for middle class Americans has mushroomed and developed at a breakneck pace, as the gold centerpiece that represents The American Dream…. Yet it is property tax breaks, and property tax relief for the middle class in the state of California – that has kept that dream alive.

PART ONE: Parent to Child Exclusion From Reassessment

Parent to Child Exclusion From Reassessment

Parent to Child Exclusion From Reassessment

Although trust beneficiaries, estate heirs, and homeowners in general hear more and more these days about “trust loans” and “intra-family trusts” used in conjunction with Proposition 58, which has graced Californians with its’ parent to child exclusion from property tax reassessment at current market value… there are, however, a good deal of misconceptions and a fair amount of confusion about this process that we should try to clear up a bit.

With recent changes to property tax relief surfacing, we don’t fully know what the effect these changes will have on Proposition 58 on Prop 13 property tax relief benefits, including the wonderful benefits trust loan funding provides, in terms of buying out property shares inherited by co-beneficiaries, or “sibling to sibling property transfer”, as realtors and tax attorneys like to refer to this process.

Middle class residents are getting more interested in this type of transaction, as it is moving the lending process away from more conventional, credit-based, hard money loans replete with high-interest charges and fine-print fees, piles of invasive personal-info paperwork… monthly payments that go on for years; so on and so forth.

So starting February 16, 2021, if you transfer your property to your children (or, grandchildren, if the parents have passed away), by way of inheritance, gifting, a sale, any hybrid sort of property transfer; estate planning outcomes; etc. – inherited real property taxes will be reassessed at yearly current market value.

Due to changes to the CA Proposition 58 parent to child exclusion benefit, heirs in the future will no longer be privy to inheriting property taxes, your Proposition 13 low tax base or “Proposition 13 Basis” has been California tax law for decades. With Proposition 58 protected rights such as sibling to sibling property transfer, or transferring parents property taxes inexpensively since 1986… with homeowners being able to continue inheriting property taxes, while having the right to keep parents property taxes on pretty much all property tax transfer scenarios.

However, if this property tax issue involving the watering down of Proposition 58 tax relief benefits is in fact a trend… and it does keep going in the direction is appears to be going – beginning with Proposition 19, with the possibility of Proposition 15 re-surfacing again with a more effective marketing plan the next time around – property tax transfer, parent to child transfer of property and the ability to keep parents property taxes may continue to be unraveled to a point where genuine property tax relief in California may be rendered virtually inactive. 

Most Californians certainly hope this will not be the case, since California is the only state with property tax relief programs that really count, so therefore we trust voters will be more circumspect next time, and perhaps pay closer attention the next time a political measure looking to unravel property tax relief in California comes up for a vote – to help the CA Legislature pay for unfunded pensions as well as assisting the California Association of Realtors in getting more homes up into the market for sale!

Let’s hope that does not occur… and keep sending emails and letters, plus phone calls, to our state political representatives, now that it looks like voters are waking up to what they have been manipulated into voting for – not realizing what actually lurked in the details, under the hood of Prop 19 – with heartstring-tugging provisions, cleverly giving Californians something to vote for, with titles such as Property Tax Fairness for Family Homes, Property Tax Fairness for Seniors, the Severely Disabled, and Victims of Wildfire and Natural Disasters. 

The CA Association of Realtors  and the CA Legislature was clearly not going to be able to engender support  for a property tax measure entitled Prop19, Removal of Parent to Child Exclusion & Unraveling Your Right to Avoid Property Tax Reassessment…

A limited version of the parent to child exclusion, or parent to child exemption, does still seem to be secure for beneficiaries; that is to say moving into inherited property as a primary residence within a year after a parent passes away is a safe way to retain Proposition 58 benefits, with, additionally, the valued ability to buyout property inherited by siblings through a trust loan; as long as one is able to  move ones’ residence over the course of a year – essentially turning ones’ life upside down after the death of a parent – which is hopefully not so inconvenient or troublesome as to be paralyzing or traumatic.  And time will tell how this will play out.

 

Transferring A Parent’s Property Tax Rate & Prop 58 Loans

Transferring A Parent's Property Tax Rate & Prop 58 Loans

Transferring A Parent’s Property Tax Rate & Prop 58 Loans

This “parent to child exemption” has saved so many  beneficiaries, homeowners and commercial property owners, thousands  of dollars;  making it possible to put a few dollars away in the bank every year, with the ability to avoid property tax assessment… and transfer parents property taxes at a reasonably low base rate — having the right to keep parents property taxes at the low tax base they were accustomed to paying; i.e., inheriting property taxes that remain low.

Otherwise — very few middle class homeowners could afford to keep an inherited home. They’d have to sell out, given that most of these estate heirs or trust beneficiaries have their own home to maintain and pay taxes on! Or, beneficiaries can still go to a blog or Website that is deeply focused on Proposition 58 and Proposition 13, trust loans and estate property tax reduction like, for example  Property Tax Transfer Trusts.

Or you can conduct research on some other sites focused on Prop 58 and unique, consistently  effective uses of intra-family trusts as  trust loans, generally to buyout property shares owned by co-beneficiaries of the same estate or trust — along with locking in a low property tax base by avoiding CA property tax reassessment at current, typically  high market values, such as https://cloanc.com/tag/california-prop-58

Exactly why many of us think other states, particularly expensive  states, should be looking into property tax relief for all property tax transfer scenarios, involving property tax breaks like the parent to child transfer of inherited property, similar to tax breaks avoiding CA property tax reassessment at current market value. 

Realistic examples of high-tax states that desperately need property tax relief are, for example, states like Massachusetts, or New York, Texas, or Pennsylvania… States like this should all have a property tax exclusion or exemption to protect middle class homeowners  from property tax evaluation at current market rates… giving residential and commercial property owners the right to avoid property tax reassessment every year.  Establishing lower property taxes for all property owners, including landlords; which would  affect  apt. building and commercial store rentals all across any major state… thereby impacting the finances of middle class residents and commercial property owners in an extremely positive fashion.

The surprising reality in California is the fact that so many homeowners do not understand property tax transfer, nor do they understand the use of trust loans and trust lenders, when inheriting a property you want to keep, and need a trust loan to pay off beneficiaries who had insisted on selling their shares in the inherited property, to equalize cash for them in the process, so they don’t need to sell, often below fair value, to a third party.

People that do not understand any of this need to do a little research, on info blogs like this one; or on Websites that delve into Proposition 58, and how property tax transfers and trust loans work, such as the  Trust and Estate Loans Website… or at one of the transaction oriented sites like Commercial Loan Corp  This gives nervous  beneficiaries a great deal of accurate information to help them avoid estate conflicts with co-beneficiaries… typically siblings.  So for once, the inheritance and estate process becomes a win-win experience for all concerned! If you need assistance with a Trust or Estate Loan, you can reach Commercial Loan Corporation at 877-464-1066. They can assist you with the process and answer any questions you might have on the topic of Parent to Child Exclusion from Reassessment and transferring the property taxes from a parent to a child when a trust is involved. 

The Trust Loan Proposition 58 Process – Interview with Account Rep Abe Ordaz, Rising Star at Commercial Loan Corp.

California Proposition 58 Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer Trust Loan Specialist

California Proposition 58 Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer Trust Loan Specialist

On Oct. 2nd, 2020, Property Tax Transfer Trusts sat down with Account Representative Abe Ordaz from Commercial Loan Corp, in Newport Beach, California; to discuss his routine with trust and estate attorneys, trust administrator and beneficiaries, explaining the trust loan / Proposition 58 funding process…

Property Tax Transfer:  Abe, thank you so much for sitting down with me today to chat about your work at Commercial Loan Corp and how you assist clients when it comes to using California Proposition 58 to transfer a parents low property tax base to a child who is inheriting a home.

Abraham Ordaz: Sure, my pleasure.

Property Tax Transfer:  Abe, who do you generally speak to when it comes to taking calls from prospects?

Abraham Ordaz: I speak to a variety of involved parties when it comes to helping a client transfer a parents low Prop 13 property tax base from a parent to a child. Often times the conversation begins with a Trust Administrator or a Trust Beneficiary who is interested in using Prop 58 to transfer a property tax base from a parent to a child on an inherited property. After that initial conversation it is common for me to also have a conversation with the Trust & Estate Attorney who is assisting them with the distribution of the trust or estate.

On occasion beneficiaries do not have an attorney who is currently working with them and I am able to refer them to one in their area who is familiar with the Proposition 58 Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer process and who can help them secure their property tax transfer benefit. At Commercial Loan Corporation we have helped hundreds of clients by providing them with a loan to an irrevocable trust so that an equal distribution can be made and they can meet the requirements set by the California Board of Equalization to qualify for the Proposition 58 property tax transfer benefit.

Property Tax Transfer: Are your clients and attorneys usually familiar with trust loans, and how they work with the California Proposition 58 process?

Abraham Ordaz: Many of the Attorneys that I work with are familiar with the Proposition 58 process, as well as Proposition 13 and the need for a trust loan to equalize a distribution when a trust or estate does not have sufficient liquid assets. In fact, many of my clients are referred to me by their trust and estate Attorney.

We are one of the only California Trust and Estate Lenders who will lend directly to an Irrevocable Trust with no personal guarantee from the acquiring beneficiary and we are the only California lender that I am aware of that specializes in these types of transactions, specifically to help our clients secure every single Proposition 58 property tax benefit.

That’s the reason I get so many Attorney referrals.  Attorneys want to make sure their clients are in good hands, when it comes to something this important – and that the process is done 100% correctly so that the client will qualify for the Proposition 58 parent to child exclusion, or the parent to child exemption, from property tax reassessment.  Attorneys are well aware that we typically help clients save more than $6,000 per year in property taxes on an inherited home.  Without exception, that’s the bottom line critical issue for them!

Property Tax Transfer: Abe, that is fantastic that you have developed such great relationships with Trust & Estate Attorneys.  Do you usually provide them with an estimate on how much you would be able to save their clients when it comes to property taxes?

Abraham Ordaz: Yes, we provide a free cost benefit analysis for each client. It tells them exactly how much we expect their client to save in property taxes each year as opposed to if their property were to be reassessed. At that time we also provide them with a free quote for the trust loan so that we can make sure it is in their best interest. In most cases it is of great benefit and we generally save our clients over $6,000 per year in property taxes by helping them keep a parents low Prop 13 property tax base.

Property Tax Transfer:  That’s significant. Do you get into the various particulars with Proposition 58, and  how that works in concert with loans to trusts?

Abraham Ordaz: Yes, we break everything down into very simple terms so that the Proposition 58 property tax transfer and trust loan process are all easy to understand. That is one of the reasons why so many Trust and Estate Attorneys who deal with California Proposition 58 love to work with us. 

Property Tax Transfer:  Got it. Abe, how do you help your clients who are interested in keeping a parents low property tax base on an inherited home understand how the trust loan and Proposition 58 parent to child transfer benefits work, keeping the initial inheritance property transfer taxes down, buying out siblings’ property ownership shares, and so on?  Yet keeping it very simple.

Abraham Ordaz: I start with the basics of Proposition 58 and the California Board of Equalization requirements for a Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer. I then help them determine how much their trust or estate will need in order to make an equal distribution. After that we review all the numbers together and I answer any questions they may have on the process. Next we get their Attorney involved so that they can handle all of the legal aspects of the Proposition 58 parent to child exclusion and provide us with all of the required information for the trust or estate.

Lastly, we provide them with the funds needed so that an equal distribution can be made in order for them to meet that qualification requirement for Prop 58. The Attorney or Property Tax Consultant then helps them submit their property tax transfer request to the County Assessors office so that they can secure their parents low property tax base.  

Property Tax Transfer:  At the end of the day it’s really just all about saving money on property taxes for clients, isn’t it. It’s a complex process, but the motivations remains very simple, doesn’t it?

Abraham Ordaz: Yes, bottom line, it’s a simple matter for these clients and lawyers.  It’s all about how we can help clients save money on property taxes to keep their family home. I help explain all this clearly to the heirs that want to keep their inherited property. 

Property Tax Transfer: Yes I see.  Abe, how do you explain why the trust is so crucial to this entire process?

Abraham Ordaz: Typically when attorneys ask about the trust loan process – I tell them our loan goes directly to the trust… and follows the property.  Conventional lenders want to take to take the property out of the trust – but once the property is taken out of the trust, this often triggers a reassessment…  So if you took a cash loan from a traditional bank for example – you’d end up putting the property in the beneficiary’s name and thus get reassessed at current property value. Which in most cases raises the property tax rate significantly. If  the property was purchased say 20 years ago, the property tax would be significantly higher today. 

Property Tax Transfer:  Got it.  Abe, do you get into the customer service aspect at all?  I understand that a very special kind of customer service is critical to this process, to be successful, so to speak, with each family.  

Abraham Ordaz: Yes… Customer service is the most important aspect to our business and we try to be our best version of ourselves for every client regardless of the size of the loan. Everyone is treated equally and respectfully.  Everyone that joins the Commercial Loan Corp family, as it were, is a V.I.P. client!

Property Tax Transfer: That’s very interesting and a rare thing to find these days in this business climate. Well, we want to thank you so much for sitting and chatting with us today.  We really appreciate it.

Abraham OrdazIt’s my pleasure. Thanks for having me.

A New Threat Arises ~ Critics of Property Tax Relief Look to Unravel CA Proposition 58 with (2020) Prop 19

Vote No Proposition 19

Vote No Proposition 19

A Threat to Proposition 58, Parent to Child Exclusion, Arises

If they were keeping both eyes open, most property owners in California were looking, tentatively, for signs on the horizon of any new threat to the popular property tax break known as the “parent to child exemption, or “Prop 58 parent to child exclusion”… Meaning, exclusion from having your home, or any other property, reassessed every year at current property tax rates.  Being that this exclusion is the the main foundation  that property tax relief in California is built on, if you were serious about dismantling property tax relief in this state, it would be likely that you’d go after this critical tax break in earnest.

So naturally, at the last moment, when everyone thought they might have  “dodged the bullet” in terms of efforts to dismantle Proposition 13 or Proposition 58 one more time, relentless critics of California Proposition 13 and Proposition 58 decided to add one more measure to the mix, to remove the parent to child exclusion allowed under Proposition 58, from California home owners… A measure they are calling Proposition 19.  Very short sighted! 

These measures also kill off our right, in conjunction with Proposition 58, to get a loan to an irrevocable trust and keep a low property tax base forever, from parent to child transfer, also called parent to child exclusion or parent to child exemption… with the ability to transfer  property between siblings or buyout siblings’ share of inherited property.  Proposition 15 kills off landlords’ tax breaks and so have fun watching your rent go sky high, landlords will have no choice to stay in business!  In fact everything will go up in price, all goods and services as we have said many times. 

Proposition 19 kills the exemption we just mentioned, the CA Proposition 13 protected parent to child transfer… in other words transfer of property between family members… No more ability to transfer parents property taxes (in other words, their low tax rate becomes your own low tax rate). Inheriting property taxes will be no more, and you’ll be spending over $6,000 more every year in property taxes.  No joke.  You won’t be able to keep parents property taxes any more, property tax transfer will be no more… no more ability to avoid property tax reassessment.  That’s the killer.                          

No longer being able to avoid property tax reassessment would be a truly devastating event for home owners who depend on extra spendable cash freed up by the money they save from the lack of property tax reassessment.  Losing the parent to child exclusion, in an already hyper-expensive state, would devastate millions of Californians.  Not to mention the possibility of the so-called Split-Roll or “Proposition 15” commercial property tax, which would certainly add to the devastation by raising industrial and commercial property taxes, including apt. building landlords, forcing landlords to raise rents on residential and business tenants…

Or we could talk about trust beneficiaries or estate heirs losing their ability to get  a loan for hundreds of thousands of dollars to an irrevocable trust to buyout siblings who are intent on selling their share of a beloved inherited home, along with establishing a low property tax base made possible by Proposition 13, working in tandem with Proposition 58.  And the list goes on. 

Without being partisan or subjective – it’s fairly clear to any reasonable person that would herald in grave economic disturbance, and even disaster, for the entire state, where middle class  and working class people are concerned.   Obviously, many residents in Malibu or  Beverly Hills or Santa Barbara would not be feeling the pinch.  However, we’re not talking about the 1%.   

This brainchild of C.A.R. and the CA Legislature is, if you step back and think about it, not only brazen but also short-sighted, as they are actually looking  to fund special interests with revenue from property taxes — right smack in the middle of a Pandemic.  With over 6.7 million Californians having signed up for unemployment checks, these critics of property tax relief want to remove these universally popular property tax breaks protected by  Proposition 13 and Proposition 58.  Benefits that middle class and working class California families have become  accustomed to, and depend on. 

Proposition 58 Particulars

Most Californians are familiar with Proposition 58 and the Prop 58 parent to child exclusion. As you know, California Proposition 58 serves to protect folks who owe $8,500 or more in additional property taxes, while they settle their affairs. Prop 58 also allows beneficiaries who wish to keep inherited property in their family to buyout co-beneficiaries’ property shares, through a trust loan, and helps those looking to keep their inherited home also keep a low Proposition 13 protected property tax base their parents paid. And everyone goes away happy, win-win, all the way around.

In 1986, to protect families from massive property tax hikes, voters passed Proposition 58, revising the California constitution to ensure transfers of property between parents and children could be executed with the right to avoid property tax reassessment. Under Proposition 58 property of any value, plus additional property with up to a million dollars of assessed value, can be transferred between parents and children without reassessment.

However, the chief sponsor of ACA-11 (Proposition 19) the California Association of Realtors (C.A.R.) came along and decided to spoil all these critical win-win protections. C.A.R. assembled enough signatures to get their initiative on the ballot. Apparently, C.A.R. is motivated by their monetary interest in drumming up new home sales, regardless of the fact that the measure creates a multi-billion-dollar tax increase statewide, will throw the entire middle class California economy into chaos, already in turmoil due to the Covid-19 health and unemployment crisis…

The 2020 Proposition 19 would look to repeal the 1986 Proposition 58 parent to child transfer (property tax break) and impose reassessment of inherited or transferred property within families. The one exception being if the property was used as the principal residence of the beneficiary to whom it was transferred, and that exclusion is even capped.

Unintended or Intended Consequences?

The Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) estimated that the repeal of the “inter-generational transfer protections” guaranteed by the Prop 58 parent to child exclusion, and Proposition 193 grandparent to grandchild exemption would, if passed, cause somewhere between 40,000 to 60,000 families in California to be crippled economically by higher yearly property taxes.

Obviously, most middle class families would be forced to immediately sell an inherited home left to them by a surviving parent. Thus, a serious imposition has been placed on the “right to choose” for countless middle class families… simply so realtors can sell a few more homes on the market.  The trade off does seem to be rather uneven.  If Proposition 19 passes, all those beneficiaries in California will be expected to move in to their parent’s home and make it their primary residence within one year of their surviving parent’s death. 

The basis for this measure is unrealistic on its’ face, for a number of reasons… Many beneficiaries are already home owners, and pay out a fair amount of cash every month already to maintain their own mortgage and/or property upkeep. Moreover, if a beneficiary has a large family, and his or her parent’s home is not spacious enough – what alternatives are left for these folks?

If Mom or Dad’s home is situated a long distance away from a beneficiary’s place of work, and/or the spouse’s workplace – and perhaps inconveniently far away from their children’s school, adding possibly an additional 60 or 90 minutes on the freeway each way, back and forth every day… What options will these families have to look to? 

Critics of property tax relief in California are proposing somewhat unrealistic measures that, although they may look good on paper from a financial perspective,  they fail to incorporate realistic issues and scenarios that exist for regular people with regular lives. 

So vote your conscience in November.  We suggest you vote “No to Proposition 19”.

Information and Trust Loan Funding

For more details on the C.A.R. originated Proposition 19 effort to turn back the clock on property tax relief in California, you can go to CaliforniaProposition58.org

For more information on trust loans working in concert with Proposition 58, go to Commercial Loan Corp   Or to apply for a trust loan and speak to an account representative, go to “Apply for a Trust Loan”…  Simply to read up on Prop 13 and Prop 58 parent to child exclusion, as well as on critics of property tax relief in California,  plus the Covid-19 effect on real estate throughout the state – please go to the article: Coronavirus Crisis is the Last Thing the California Real Estate Market Needed!