Why Consulting With an Attorney, a Property Tax Specialist or Trust Lender is Crucial Now, When Inheriting a Home in California

Inheriting a Home in California

Inheriting a Home in California

When inheriting a home from parents, one should always have a reliable estate attorney, if we’re looking to transfer a parent’s property taxes or we’re inheriting assets in trust or in a standard estate or probate; with an experienced eye on all  proceedings, especially the process of “equalizing trust loan distribution among beneficiaries” if a trust loan is a part of the process – a phrase often used by property tax specialists, and frequently misunderstood by heirs and beneficiaries.

“Equalizing trust loan distribution” simply means that each heir or beneficiary / sibling intent on selling their shares of inherited property  left to them by a parent, will receive an equal amount of money… settling expenses when there is little or no cash in the trust. 

Paying off a debt that a parent or grandparent has on a home can impact beneficiaries looking to borrow, as well as lenders. Having a competent attorney who knows how to structure a trust so that beneficiaries looking to keep inherited property at their parent’s low property tax base can retain that family property… while making sure that co-beneficiaries intent on selling their inherited property get an equal share of cash from a loan to an irrevocable trust.

This is where an experienced trust lender comes into play, preferably a lender that provides trust funding with their own capital, which ensures that interest charged will be as low as possible. Not using expensive money from investors, lenders with their own capital are free to charge as little as they wish, in terms of fees. In fact, a trust lender like this is free to exercise extreme flexibility with underwriting, maintaining particularly reasonable terms and conditions; as well as being able to implement trust loan transactions quickly, in seven to ten days.


A private money lender that loans to irrevocable trusts, applies for and works in tandem with California Proposition 19… So all the beneficiaries [in the family] who are looking to sell their real property shares – for the purpose of facilitating “non pro-rata distribution”, in other words getting an equal share of the entire overall estate – however not necessarily of every asset.

If there is a family that goes to a conventional, pricey lender like Wells Fargo for instance – they will always require adult children, beneficiaries that want to sell an inherited property, to ‘go off-title’, and that always triggers present-day tax reassessment. And that spells an expensive 66.66% tax hike!

If the family in question uses the Commercial Loan Corp, a company we have been using for years… the loan they provide is to a trust, and not to beneficiaries; so there is no title, and no crippling 66.66% property tax reassessment. Their terms can be a lot more flexible than an institutional lender like Wells Fargo or Bank of America. Also, Commercial Loan Corp is self funded, and that’s basically why they can extend easier terms to clients.

Compliance for both commercial and residential property owners is far less strict. Commercial Loan Corp doesn’t charge any fees up-front, that’s another great benefit. Plus, they don’t require paying interest on their trust loan in advance. Not only that, there is never a “due-on-sale” clause… that requires the mortgage to be repaid in full when sold; or that all or some of the interest owed must be paid up-front to secure the mortgage. No “alienation clause”… in the event of a property transfer, stating that the borrower has to pay back the mortgage in full before the borrower can transfer the property to another person. There is none of that.

Having access to private capital, along with seasoned advice, and expertise from a property tax consultant and a trust lender on how to transfer a parent’s property taxes,  becomes even more crucial in an inheritance scenario when a family is looking to keep a family home for a long period of time. 

California Proposition 19, which was (voted into law in 1986) formerly California Proposition 58, can enable a parent-to-child home transfer of a “principal residence” to be excluded from property tax reassessment even if associated with a “change in ownership”.  Which could trigger reassessment of property taxes, often by accident, resulting in  property tax reassessment – if not for experienced guidance from a trust lender and, frequently, from a property tax consultant or tax attorney as well, guiding the trust loan process and  property tax transfer; working in concert with Proposition 19 and parent-to-child exclusion (from high current  market rates).

Advice from property tax transfer specialists like this generally includes guidance for beneficiaries and new home owners within the process of being able to transfer a parent’s property taxes, plus showing inheritors what they need to do to keep parents property taxes when inheriting property and subsequently inheriting property taxes from a parent.

Contact Commercial Loan Corporation for all of your Trust Loan needs at https://cloanc.com/ or by phone at 877-464-1066.

 

How Will Proposition 19 Impact Middle Class Families in California?

How Will Proposition 19 Impact Middle Class Families in California

How Will Proposition 19 Impact Families in California

Before Proposition 19 existed, parents in California could transfer their primary residence and $1,000,000 per parent of other property to their children without triggering a tax reassessment of  those properties. After Feb. 15, 2021 that exemption, the parent-child exclusion,  was watered down, limiting access to this time-honored exclusion from current property tax rates to moving into an inherited home only as a primary residence;  and limiting a beneficiary’s ability to go about avoiding property tax reassessment in CA to a strict 12-month move-in period. 

As long as this deadline is kept, heirs will be avoiding property tax reassessment in CA without issue.  An heir’s ability to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes, and the right to keep parents property taxes on any property tax transfer from a parent, as Proposition 19 parent to child transfer, or Prop 19 parent to child exclusion, is guaranteed.  As is the right for a beneficiary to get a trust loan from a trust lender to implement a  transfer of property between siblings… In other words, you can lock in a low Prop 13 property tax base plus buyout co- beneficiaries if they want to sell their inherited property.  Amen!  And in the midst of the Coronavirus crisis, with rampant unemployment and under-employment… a 6-figure trust loan could be a life-saver.

After Feb. 16, a transfer of a principal residence by a parent to a child (heir) is only exempt if the parent was using the property as their principal, or primary, residence; and the heir is also residing in the inherited home as a primary, principal residence following the parental property transfer.  If that is not a problem, we’ll most likely see an equivalent number of middle class and blue collar families avoiding property tax reassessment in CA as before Prop 19 became law. 

Even if only half as many people as before take advantage of the Prop 19 parent-child exclusion, 50% is still a pretty healthy number.  No other transfers of property between parents and children will be exempt from reassessment, with the exception of a family farm, which is currently defined but as “farmed land” whether the property includes a residence or not. 

Transfers that are excluded from property tax reassessment do have limitations, however.  The exclusion applies only as far as the assessed value at the time of transfer plus $1,000,000. Any property beyond that value would be reassessed at a current market tax value.

Housingwire.com recently wrote: “Prop 19 will deliver needed funding for cities, counties, and school districts when they need it most. It will generate hundreds of millions in annual revenue for fire protection, affordable housing, homeless programs, safe drinking water, and other local services and dedicated revenue for fire districts in rural and urban communities to fix inequities that threaten life-saving response times to wildfires and medical emergencies.”

So how will Proposition 19 impact the middle class, working family  housing market in California, admittedly an expensive state to live in.  Although certain components in California will benefit from a new property tax revenue stream, regular middle class and blue collar families residing in inherited homes may still find it difficult keeping up with the rising costs and expensive lifestyle of California. Yet Prop 58 can still help. Proposition 58 Property Tax Breaks are still in place, despite restrictions.  Providing you intend to occupy an inherited home as your primary residence you can still save as much as $10,000 annually in property tax savings.  

President of One80Reality, Nick Solis, tells us:  ““We are definitely  going to see property taxes rise on inherited homes. California is one of those places where blue collar workers usually pass down homes to kids and other family members. Those homes are now going to be taxed at a much higher rate. It will force their hands to sell, because the properties will be more expensive to retain.”

Mr. Solis said he’s not worried about selling homes, but a new demographic of home buyers is going to emerge. He tells us: “Not     all who receive inherited homes come from money. Many blue collar workers and families bought in previous decades when homes were affordable, and are passing them down to their kids. They will see a tax increase. We’re going to see a different demographic. We were already seeing a major push of middle class and blue collar people,  that could afford a home in places like the Bay area, now moving into the central valley or other more affordable places because they just feel too uncomfortable living in their current homes. And now taxes are going to be even higher on inherited homes.”

A well known California realtor, who preferred to remain anonymous,  recently claimed: “With higher property taxes, keeping inherited homes as rental properties may become unprofitable, estate-planning attorneys are going to be very busy, as this new law may cause many people to decide to sell properties that they intended to pass on to their heirs.” 

Millennials and other younger generations will be impacted as well, avoiding property tax reassessment in CA People in their early twenties might decide to leave California, with no plan to ever return.  This is quite different than recent years, where the state was attracting a lot of young starter-home buyers. The same young adults are now looking carefully for more affordable homes, after graduating from college – even if that means leaving the state completely, with a new job; and perhaps a new family.

Another seasoned California realtor told us, on condition of remaining anonymous:  “It’s a real game-changer.  Both in terms of California properties being sold that would have been passed on through a family trust, or by the beneficiaries who decide they either can’t afford to pay property taxes based on a current assessed value, or just don’t want to pay the higher property taxes. The state’s going to make a lot of money.”

Higher property taxes or not, California will always be an attractive place to live. There is sunshine 12 months per year, an ocean nearby, convenient cities and yet rural areas 30 minutes away… “People are always going to want to live in California, but I can see life getting more expensive here a lot faster than I expected,” Mr. Solis added.