Taking Advantage of Every Key Property Tax Break

Taking Advantage of Every Key Property Tax Break

Taking Advantage of Every Key California Property Tax Break

As a CA homeowner – how do you ensure, as with a parent-child transfer,  that you’re not paying more property tax than you should?

California homeowners are hit with some of the highest property taxes in America.  So the key question we face every year is – how can we legally decrease our property taxes?  As we all know – although it’s worth a second look due to the various confusing changes imposed as of 2020,  2021 – two most popular systems we can utilize to lessen our property tax burden involve tax breaks, contained in the 1978, 1986 and 2021 property tax measures entitled  Proposition 13, Proposition 58 and Proposition 19.

To clear up some of the most confusing issues associated with Prop 19 which now implements the classic parent-child transfer or parent-child exclusion (to avoid paying current property tax reassessment, or “fair market” rates), we’ll have  to examine the updated key tax breaks associated with this type of property tax relief in California, as confirmed by the CA State Board of Equalization (BOE).

To review what most of us probably already know – if you inherit a home to be used as your primary residence from your parents or from your children, who used the property as a primary residence,  you can successfully avoid property tax reassessment at fair market rates. This special treatment also applies if you acquire the home from your grandparents (avoiding property tax reassessment through the Proposition 193 grandparent-to-grandchild exclusion), but only if both of your parents are deceased.  Naturally these processes include any basic property tax transfer designed to avoid property tax reassessment, to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes from a dad or a mom, or from grandparents.  The point being to keep parents property taxes at all costs, through a parent-child transfer.

As of February 16, 2021, an inherited home must be used as your primary residence if you wish to avoid property tax reassessment upon it. Additionally, if the difference between the property’s assessed value and fair market value is more than $1,000,000 at the time of transfer, the new assessed value will be the fair market value minus $1,000,000.

Irrevocable Trust Loans & Proposition 19 Property Tax Exclusion

Changes to CA Proposition 58 property tax breaks became active Feb 16, 2021 due to Proposition 19 – trust lenders all across Southern and Northern California are busier than ever, helping Californians who are  inheriting a home from parents, as well as beneficiaries inheriting residential property – establishing a low Proposition 13 property tax base for all inherited property going forward.

On top of all that, beneficiaries who are intent on keeping an inherited home are given, through Proposition 19, formerly Proposition 58, the ability to buyout co-beneficiaries, typically siblings, who are looking to sell their shares in the same inherited property… Only with a lot more cash in hand than a non-family outside buyer would pay for the exact same property.  

In fact, the need for middle class families to establish a low property tax base  for newly inherited property has become so urgent that well known estate & trust lender Commercial Loan Corp in Newport Beach is now offering heirs and beneficiaries inheriting a home from parents a free consultation on parent-child transfer preparation, as well as an estimate of property tax savings overall – to keep their parent’s low property tax base.  This Free Consultation for Property Tax Savings helps evaluate the benefit of a loan to an irrevocable trust, specifically for beneficiaries who want to keep inherited property at their parents’ low property tax rate, with the formerly Prop 58 [now Prop 19] parent-child transfer – to avoid current market reassessment.  This often involves an unusually fast and inexpensive buyout of siblings looking to sell their share of the same inherited home and/or land.

So to reiterate – by originating loans to trusts and estates in probate, a trust lender like Commercial Loan Corp helps to maximize the distribution of funds to a trust or estate; allowing beneficiaries to buyout inherited property from co-beneficiaries, while keeping a low property tax base when inheriting a home.  When providing mortgages to trusts or estates in probate, a good trust lender helps clients  avoid the re-evaluation of property at current tax-rates – enabling families to retain a parent’s low Proposition 13 tax base – by obtaining a parent-child exclusion, with a  parent-child transfer… saving on average $6,200+ per year in property taxes. If you need assistance with a trust loan in order to equalize a trust distribution to qualify for Proposition 19 or Proposition 58, we highly recommend you call Commercial Loan Corp at 877-756-4454. 

The Trust Loan Process From the Inside Out

Tanis Alonso, senior account manager at the Newport Beach trust lending firm, offers an experienced inside viewpoint on the trust loan transaction in conjunction with the Proposition 58 and Prop 19 exclusion from paying high current property tax rates:   

Let’s say a property value is currently one million dollars and the current tax base is $1,200. If they were to get reassessed at current value that would be around $11,000 annually.  By someone keeping the property and obtaining a trust loan to properly buy out their siblings that allows the beneficiary that is keeping the property to keep parents property taxes, to retain 100% of the Proposition 13 tax base that was paid by their parents and keep that low property tax base of $1,200.

This of course creates much greater affordability than if they were to improperly buy out their siblings and have that property reassessed. The loan to trust goes hand in hand with the Proposition 58 [now Proposition 19] property tax transfer system, creating enough liquidity to equalize distributions, not sell, and allow a beneficiary to keep their parents property with their low property tax base. It does sound counter intuitive – yet it’s true…

A Property Tax  Appeal Can Lower Taxes on Your Home

County property tax assessors in all 58 California counties assess every homeowner’s property tax by multiplying each home’s taxable value by existing applicable tax rates.  The taxable value is typically based on purchase price, generally referred to as “base-year value”.  However, tax authorities do have the right to increase taxation by up to 2% every year in tandem with inflation, plus reassess the tax value of most real properties under certain specific circumstances. 

For example, if a property owner makes changes to his or her property, such as home renovations, or  adding a large swimming pool, or perhaps building an additional wing or modernizing a kitchen or bathroom, whatever – the county tax assessor who gets a copy of that property’s building permits, might possibly reassess, if a decision to do so is made at that time. And this is when discrepancies or errors sometimes occur, when a tax assessor is also able to initiate a separate base-year value on any new renovations or re-constructed areas attached to a home. Mistakes are often associated with these reassessments.   

Therefore, one effective way to lessen your property tax burden is to reduce the assessed value of your home by filing an appeal stating that  the home’s assessed value is less than the value the tax assessor assigned to it.  

The appeal might prove that the home is in much worse condition than the assessor factored into his or her assessment… or perhaps prove that newly constructed changes to the home were not nearly as extensive as the final property tax assessment showed. Tax reduction firms typically handle county tax assessor challenges of this kind, tax appeals, and this is generally the direction most residents go in, in order to submit a successful appeal, in keeping with the CA State Board of Equalization Property Tax Dept.

California State Board of Equalization County Assessor Directory

The BOE publishes a helpful online guide that explains property tax exclusions in detail. For further information about applying an exclusion to your property inheritance, home or living situation, and any required forms you need to complete the deadline for filing these forms, contact your local tax assessor by consulting the BOE county assessor directory.

Transferring A Parent’s Property Tax Rate & Prop 58 Loans

Transferring A Parent's Property Tax Rate & Prop 58 Loans

Transferring A Parent’s Property Tax Rate & Prop 58 Loans

This “parent to child exemption” has saved so many  beneficiaries, homeowners and commercial property owners, thousands  of dollars;  making it possible to put a few dollars away in the bank every year, with the ability to avoid property tax assessment… and transfer parents property taxes at a reasonably low base rate — having the right to keep parents property taxes at the low tax base they were accustomed to paying; i.e., inheriting property taxes that remain low.

Otherwise — very few middle class homeowners could afford to keep an inherited home. They’d have to sell out, given that most of these estate heirs or trust beneficiaries have their own home to maintain and pay taxes on! Or, beneficiaries can still go to a blog or Website that is deeply focused on Proposition 58 and Proposition 13, trust loans and estate property tax reduction like, for example  Property Tax Transfer Trusts.

Or you can conduct research on some other sites focused on Prop 58 and unique, consistently  effective uses of intra-family trusts as  trust loans, generally to buyout property shares owned by co-beneficiaries of the same estate or trust — along with locking in a low property tax base by avoiding CA property tax reassessment at current, typically  high market values, such as https://cloanc.com/tag/california-prop-58

Exactly why many of us think other states, particularly expensive  states, should be looking into property tax relief for all property tax transfer scenarios, involving property tax breaks like the parent to child transfer of inherited property, similar to tax breaks avoiding CA property tax reassessment at current market value. 

Realistic examples of high-tax states that desperately need property tax relief are, for example, states like Massachusetts, or New York, Texas, or Pennsylvania… States like this should all have a property tax exclusion or exemption to protect middle class homeowners  from property tax evaluation at current market rates… giving residential and commercial property owners the right to avoid property tax reassessment every year.  Establishing lower property taxes for all property owners, including landlords; which would  affect  apt. building and commercial store rentals all across any major state… thereby impacting the finances of middle class residents and commercial property owners in an extremely positive fashion.

The surprising reality in California is the fact that so many homeowners do not understand property tax transfer, nor do they understand the use of trust loans and trust lenders, when inheriting a property you want to keep, and need a trust loan to pay off beneficiaries who had insisted on selling their shares in the inherited property, to equalize cash for them in the process, so they don’t need to sell, often below fair value, to a third party.

People that do not understand any of this need to do a little research, on info blogs like this one; or on Websites that delve into Proposition 58, and how property tax transfers and trust loans work, such as the  Trust and Estate Loans Website… or at one of the transaction oriented sites like Commercial Loan Corp  This gives nervous  beneficiaries a great deal of accurate information to help them avoid estate conflicts with co-beneficiaries… typically siblings.  So for once, the inheritance and estate process becomes a win-win experience for all concerned! If you need assistance with a Trust or Estate Loan, you can reach Commercial Loan Corporation at 877-464-1066. They can assist you with the process and answer any questions you might have on the topic of Parent to Child Exclusion from Reassessment and transferring the property taxes from a parent to a child when a trust is involved. 

PART ONE: Property Tax Relief Fights for Its’ Life in California…

Jon Coupal, articulate and persistent president of the authoritative and well respected “Howard Jarvis Taxpayer’s Association”, has been leading the charge in California to keep property tax relief safely in place.

There are a few other notable property tax reduction leaders, like Michael Wyatt, “Property Tax Consultant”; and Kerry Smith, courageous and visionary president of the “Commercial Loan Corp”, that furnishes trust loans tied into Proposition 58, making the transfer of property between siblings and buying out a sibling’s share of a house possible.

All of this, of course, ties into the process of inheriting property taxes, ones ability to keep parents property taxes, and property tax transfer as it pertains to the parent to child transfer (which Proposition 19 seeks to unravel) — commonly known as parent to child exclusion or a parent to child exemption.  Plus, there are high end tax reduction specialists, like noted Paramount Property Tax Appeal president Wes Nichols,  who  specialize in personal business tax reduction and property tax assessor appeals.  These folks have all been on the front lines of these issues for many years.

Not known for soft ball opinions, or for taking it easy on property tax relief opponents, Mr. Coupal was extremely candid in an interview with this Blog; and had some interesting things to say recently, in a particularly hard-hitting article in The Tahoe Daily Tribune, on Oct. 9, 2020 “Explaining the Confusing Prop 19 to Californians” and in his own column on the http://www.hjta.org Website, “Prop-15 Backers Try to Mislead Homeowners”  where Mr. Coupal stated, on Oct 21:

“Prop-15 backers try to mislead homeowners. It’s a sign of desperation. When anyone in politics starts making wild claims less than a month before an election, you know something is amiss. So it is with the proponents of Proposition 15, the “split roll” initiative which would impose the largest property tax increase in California history.

Throughout this campaign, proponents have consistently argued that the measure won’t impact homeowners because it just raises property taxes on commercial and industrial properties. But now, they claim that Prop. 15 actually saves homeowners money.

This is absurd on its face. Recent polling suggests that support for split roll is sinking fast, especially among homeowners. This might explain why proponents have, at the 11th hour, countered with the argument that, as corporations have to pay more, the tax burden for homeowners goes down. Nobody believes this.”

Mr. Coupal also brings to our attention the deliberate confusion around proposed Proposition 19; as he reiterates,

“It’s no secret that ballot initiatives can be confusing, but Proposition 19 takes obfuscation to a whole new level. Voters can’t be blamed if they can’t remember whether Prop. 19 is the initiative that is a massive property tax hike or the measure that actually has something good for homeowners or the initiative that has something to do with firefighting. The fact is, all three are at least somewhat true — especially the part about the big tax increase.

Let’s clear up the confusion: Proposition 13, passed in 1978, gave California homeowners certainty about their future property tax liability because increases in the “taxable value” of property would be limited to 2 percent per year. Property would be reassessed to market value only when it changed hands. But that tax hike even applied when property owners transferred a property to their own children.

Prop. 19 would repeal Proposition 58 and force the reassessment of inherited or transferred property within families. The only exception is if the property is used as the principal residence of the person to whom it was transferred and even that exclusion is capped…”

If you repeal Proposition 58, the uniquely Californian funding process involving trust loans tied into Proposition 58 may have to be revised. And by the way, the ‘principal residence’ ruling must take place within one year of the passing of the decedent who left behind the property in question.  This in itself creates a myriad of problems, if you have an additional mortgage thrust upon you, plus the expenses that very well may accompany  another residence if you’re also a homeowner at the time you inherit this additional property. 

You may have a large family that won’t fit into the inherited property, noo that you’re forced to move in within a year.  The inherited home may be a much longer drive from your job or your spouses’ job.  Your children may attend a school in a totally different district, causing additional problems; etc. so on and so forth.  Otherwise, you may be forced to sell your inherited property, and that can bring inconvenient and expensive issues along with it as well.  It may not be so simple.

At any rate, Mr. Coupal added, “The non-partisan Legislative Analyst’s Office estimates that the repeal of the “inter-generational transfer protections” will result in tens of thousands of California families getting hit with higher property taxes every year. The LAO acknowledges that Prop. 19 imposes an additional tax burden in the “hundreds of millions of dollars”.

>> Click Here to go to Part Two…

A New Threat Arises ~ Critics of Property Tax Relief Revise CA Proposition 58 with (2020) Prop 19

Vote No Proposition 19

Vote No Proposition 19

A Threat to Proposition 58, Parent to Child Exclusion, Arises

If they were keeping both eyes open, most property owners in California were looking, tentatively, for signs on the horizon of any new threat to the popular property tax break known as the “parent to child exemption, or “Prop 58 parent to child exclusion”… Meaning, exclusion from having your home, or any other property, reassessed every year at current property tax rates.  Being that this exclusion is the the main foundation  that property tax relief in California is built on, if you were serious about dismantling property tax relief in this state, it would be likely that you’d go after this critical tax break in earnest.

So naturally, at the last moment, when everyone thought they might have  “dodged the bullet” in terms of efforts to dismantle Proposition 13 or Proposition 58 one more time, relentless critics of California Proposition 13 and Proposition 58 decided to add one more measure to the mix, to remove the parent to child exclusion allowed under Proposition 58, from California home owners… A measure they are calling Proposition 19.  Very short sighted! 

These measures also kill off our right, in conjunction with Proposition 58, to get a loan to an irrevocable trust and keep a low property tax base forever, from parent to child transfer, also called parent to child exclusion or parent to child exemption… with the ability to transfer  property between siblings or buyout siblings’ share of inherited property.  Proposition 15 kills off landlords’ tax breaks and so have fun watching your rent go sky high, landlords will have no choice to stay in business!  In fact everything will go up in price, all goods and services as we have said many times. 

Proposition 19 kills the exemption we just mentioned, the CA Proposition 13 protected parent to child transfer… in other words transfer of property between family members… No more ability to transfer parents property taxes (in other words, their low tax rate becomes your own low tax rate). Inheriting property taxes will be no more, and you’ll be spending over $6,000 more every year in property taxes.  No joke.  You won’t be able to keep parents property taxes any more, property tax transfer will be no more… no more ability to avoid property tax reassessment.  That’s the killer.                          

No longer being able to avoid property tax reassessment would be a truly devastating event for home owners who depend on extra spendable cash freed up by the money they save from the lack of property tax reassessment.  Losing the parent to child exclusion, in an already hyper-expensive state, would devastate millions of Californians.  Not to mention the possibility of the so-called Split-Roll or “Proposition 15” commercial property tax, which would certainly add to the devastation by raising industrial and commercial property taxes, including apt. building landlords, forcing landlords to raise rents on residential and business tenants…

Or we could talk about trust beneficiaries or estate heirs losing their ability to get  a loan for hundreds of thousands of dollars to an irrevocable trust to buyout siblings who are intent on selling their share of a beloved inherited home, along with establishing a low property tax base made possible by Proposition 13, working in tandem with Proposition 58.  And the list goes on. 

Without being partisan or subjective – it’s fairly clear to any reasonable person that would herald in grave economic disturbance, and even disaster, for the entire state, where middle class  and working class people are concerned.   Obviously, many residents in Malibu or  Beverly Hills or Santa Barbara would not be feeling the pinch.  However, we’re not talking about the 1%.   

This brainchild of C.A.R. and the CA Legislature is, if you step back and think about it, not only brazen but also short-sighted, as they are actually looking  to fund special interests with revenue from property taxes — right smack in the middle of a Pandemic.  With over 6.7 million Californians having signed up for unemployment checks, these critics of property tax relief want to remove these universally popular property tax breaks protected by  Proposition 13 and Proposition 58.  Benefits that middle class and working class California families have become  accustomed to, and depend on. 

Proposition 58 Particulars

Most Californians are familiar with Proposition 58 and the Prop 58 parent to child exclusion. As you know, California Proposition 58 serves to protect folks who owe $8,500 or more in additional property taxes, while they settle their affairs. Prop 58 also allows beneficiaries who wish to keep inherited property in their family to buyout co-beneficiaries’ property shares, through a trust loan, and helps those looking to keep their inherited home also keep a low Proposition 13 protected property tax base their parents paid. And everyone goes away happy, win-win, all the way around.

In 1986, to protect families from massive property tax hikes, voters passed Proposition 58, revising the California constitution to ensure transfers of property between parents and children could be executed with the right to avoid property tax reassessment. Under Proposition 58 property of any value, plus additional property with up to a million dollars of assessed value, can be transferred between parents and children without reassessment.

However, the chief sponsor of ACA-11 (Proposition 19) the California Association of Realtors (C.A.R.) came along and decided to spoil all these critical win-win protections. C.A.R. assembled enough signatures to get their initiative on the ballot. Apparently, C.A.R. is motivated by their monetary interest in drumming up new home sales, regardless of the fact that the measure creates a multi-billion-dollar tax increase statewide, will throw the entire middle class California economy into chaos, already in turmoil due to the Covid-19 health and unemployment crisis…

The 2020 Proposition 19 would look to repeal the 1986 Proposition 58 parent to child transfer (property tax break) and impose reassessment of inherited or transferred property within families. The one exception being if the property was used as the principal residence of the beneficiary to whom it was transferred, and that exclusion is even capped.

Unintended or Intended Consequences?

The Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) estimated that the repeal of the “inter-generational transfer protections” guaranteed by the Prop 58 parent to child exclusion, and Proposition 193 grandparent to grandchild exemption would, if passed, cause somewhere between 40,000 to 60,000 families in California to be crippled economically by higher yearly property taxes.

Obviously, most middle class families would be forced to immediately sell an inherited home left to them by a surviving parent. Thus, a serious imposition has been placed on the “right to choose” for countless middle class families… simply so realtors can sell a few more homes on the market.  The trade off does seem to be rather uneven.  If Proposition 19 passes, all those beneficiaries in California will be expected to move in to their parent’s home and make it their primary residence within one year of their surviving parent’s death. 

The basis for this measure is unrealistic on its’ face, for a number of reasons… Many beneficiaries are already home owners, and pay out a fair amount of cash every month already to maintain their own mortgage and/or property upkeep. Moreover, if a beneficiary has a large family, and his or her parent’s home is not spacious enough – what alternatives are left for these folks?

If Mom or Dad’s home is situated a long distance away from a beneficiary’s place of work, and/or the spouse’s workplace – and perhaps inconveniently far away from their children’s school, adding possibly an additional 60 or 90 minutes on the freeway each way, back and forth every day… What options will these families have to look to? 

Critics of property tax relief in California are proposing somewhat unrealistic measures that, although they may look good on paper from a financial perspective,  they fail to incorporate realistic issues and scenarios that exist for regular people with regular lives. 

So vote your conscience in November.  We suggest you vote “No to Proposition 19”.

Information and Trust Loan Funding

For more details on the C.A.R. originated Proposition 19 effort to turn back the clock on property tax relief in California, you can go to CaliforniaProposition58.org

For more information on trust loans working in concert with Proposition 58, go to Commercial Loan Corp   Or to apply for a trust loan and speak to an account representative, go to “Apply for a Trust Loan”…  Simply to read up on Prop 13 and Prop 58 parent to child exclusion, as well as on critics of property tax relief in California,  plus the Covid-19 effect on real estate throughout the state – please go to the article: Coronavirus Crisis is the Last Thing the California Real Estate Market Needed!