New Property Tax Relief Laws & Belief in the CA Legislature

Property Tax Transfers

Property Tax Transfers

Can California rely on Property Tax Exclusions from Prop 19?

Despite the growing waves of criticism and anxiety from residents in California, regarding Proposition 19, given all the cheer-leading from the California realtor community, more or less led by the CA Realtor’s Association – state sponsored public relations continues to convince us how fabulous Proposition 19 truly is.

We are constantly reminded that, despite certain obvious limitations affecting homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting property from their parents, we do have new property  tax exclusions from Prop 19.   Proposition 19 is providing us with tremendous property tax breaks which did not exist previously, with Proposition 58 tax relief.

Truth?  Publicity?  Or happy talk… 

Supposedly, despite new property tax exclusions from Prop 19,  the state will see an extra yearly revenue of a billion dollars plus, to help schools in towns and cities – although the California State Board of Equalization (BOE) is a little short on concrete specifics and details, in terms of how much revenue is actually expected to come in overall from these new property tax laws; and specifically how much money will go to fire departments, and how much will be allocated to help seniors and the elderly… and homeowners with serious infirmities. 

Moreover, Proposition 19 also seems to be rather fuzzy, with respect to anticipated property tax revenue that is supposedly going towards balancing budgets – possibly with provisions to step up the state’s recovery from Pandemic driven financial losses.

Additionally, beyond property tax exclusions from Prop 19 that we already know about, and hope will be consistent – extra tax revenue from Proposition 19 is supposedly expected to furnish all sorts of other “significant added protections” for CA residents – although proponents of Prop 19 as well as BOE are extremely vague, as far as articulating precisely what these “protections” might be every year.  Again – fact based info dissemination?  Or simply PR happy talk…

Prop19 revenue for city and county fire departments & schools

Proponents of Proposition 19 singled out supporters of Proposition 13 property tax relief as creators of “tax schemes” and “deceptive practices” – “costing local governments and schools up to $1.5 billion every year” – without describing exactly what those “tax schemes” and “deceptive practices” actually are… And what those numbers that  supposedly cost the school system a small fortune really look like – above and beyond vague projections designed to scare tax payers half to death.  

We also frequently hear about “unfair tax loopholes” used by supposed “East Coast investors” and “celebrities” or “wealthy non- California residents” as well as “trust fund heirs” – who are perpetually unnamed, wealthy property owners, who supposedly avoid paying “their fair share of property taxes on vacation homes, income properties, and beachfront rentals they own in California.”

An obvious reference to the Lloyd Bridges family, the only family in 40 years that has been named as property tax perpetrators of the above so-called violations, whose heirs happened to inherit a nice beach home, using Proposition 13 to cap property taxes at 2%… subsequently renting the home out at $16,000 per month to vacationers from out of state. (As opposed to residing in the property as a “primary residence”.)

No other family has ever been named and singled out as using Proposition 13 for such “nefarious purposes”.  It appears that the justification for Proposition 19 limitations were based on this one family… this one inheritance.

Maintaining the spirit of Proposition 13 and Prop 58

Proponents of Proposition 19 insist that their favorite tax measure will “continue to preserve the intent of Proposition 58 and Proposition 193” – keeping family homes affordable when parents and grandparents pass on their family home to children and grandchildren to use  as a  “primary residence”. 

As we all know, this is partly true, and where  limitations are concerned… partly not true. Fortunately, beneficiaries can still     use a parent-to-child exclusion in conjunction with Proposition 19.

When inheriting property while keeping a low property tax base,  smart beneficiaries are still able to buyout property tax shares from siblings, with advice from a Property Tax Consultant like Michael Wyatt; and funding from a Trust Lender such as Commercial Loan Corp.

We continue to hear about the $1 billion per year in Prop 19 generated revenue that is going to fire departments and unions, school systems and local governments.  We also hear about that revenue somehow being used for emergency services, public hospitals, general healthcare, homeless folks, and housing projects. However… again, no specifics. Just general allusion to a lot of hopeful initiatives. 

At the same time Californians hope that they will be able keep parents property taxes, and take advantage of property tax transfers to retain a low property tax rate from this parent-to-child transfer upon inheriting property from parents, while inheriting property taxes… to avoid property tax reassessment – typically through a parent-child transfer.

Homeowners and beneficiaries are waiting to see what specific applications will be readily available to them:

• to limit property tax increases for victims of wildfires, replacing damaged or destroyed property; limiting damage from wildfires on homes through supposed funding for fire protection and emergency response.

• to cap property tax increases on family homes used as a primary residence by protecting the right of parents and grandparents to pass on their family home to children and grandchildren as a primary residence.

• to take advantage of supposedly “thousands of housing opportunities” by making homes available for first-time homeowners and families in all 58 counties across the state of California.

Ultimately, Californians are taking for granted that there is a cap on property tax increases for primary residences for homeowners over 55 years old, people with severe disabilities, and victims of natural disasters or wildfires by removing county restrictions – apparently allowing these residents to locate a home that “better fits their needs”.

State leadership may be asking residents to stretch their trust a long way; without any iron-clad guarantees. Just a long list of top-down assurances. And residents as well as estate attorneys and tax lawyers, as well as accountants, are wondering, going forward into a murky future, what they can question… and what they can really rely on.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Transferring a Property Tax Base

Transferring Property Taxes in California

Transferring Property Taxes in California

The Right Advice & Tax Plan from a Trust Lender 

Much to the relief of Californians who own property and/or are in the process of inheriting a home from a parent, for example, in any of the 58 county across the state, the parent-to-child exclusion from property tax reassessment is still alive and well in all 58 counties, in 2022.

However, quite often, new homeowners and beneficiaries trigger a property tax hike strictly by accident, and end up facing thousands upon thousands of dollars in property taxes from property tax reassessment – that could and should have been avoided, had the right advice and tax plan been in focus.

High property values in California highlight the need for careful property tax planning. If you have owned your property for many years Generally, in terms of property taxes, homeowners who have owned their home for a long time typically have a lower assessed value than current or “fair market” property value tends to be.

Parent-to-Child Exclusion

As far as parent to child transfers are concerned, when one beneficiary who is inheriting a home decides to buyout property shares inherited by co-beneficiaries (siblings) – to have complete ownership of said property – it’s easy to misstep and mistakenly trigger property tax reassessment.

A parent to child property tax transfer in is line with the effort to  avoid property tax reassessment under Proposition 19’s parent-child exclusion, retaining a parent’s Proposition 13 low property tax base. Therefore a loan to an irrevocable trust working in conjunction with Proposition 19 allows us to transfer property between siblings – buying out property from siblings.

Likewise, beneficiaries, upon inheriting property from parents, still have a property tax transfer at their disposal to transfer parents property taxes and keep parents property taxes when inheriting a parental home, and thus inheriting property taxes, but at a low  base rate.  Hence, the use of a parent-child transfer… enabling the use of the invaluable parent-to-child exclusion – bottom line, helping us avoid any possibility of triggering property tax reassessment! 

Choosing the Right  Trust Lender, to Keep a Low Property Tax  Base While Buying Out Inherited Property From Siblings

We prefer a trust lender who can formulate and deliver the more reliable, simple Proposition 19 rules & regs, in conjunction with an irrevocable trust loan to equalize beneficiary buyouts of inherited property shares.

We have found that any type of unconventional property financing other than irrevocable trust loan funding may run into unpleasant surprises such as property tax reassessment – due to an abrupt change in control, or revised ownership!

LLCs, Corporations, or various Partnership entities owning real estate are subject to a myriad of property tax rules & regs that can change on a dime, often disqualifying beneficiaries from taking full advantage of the parent-to-child exclusion, to maintain a low property tax base, and perhaps buying out inherited property shares from co-beneficiaries – avoiding property tax reassessment and running headlong into pricey financial surprises.

Transferring Your Base Year Value Under Proposition 19

Given new changes to Proposition 19, if you happen to be over age 55, or are severely disabled, you may be able to transfer your home’s current base year value to the purchase of a different home, thereby keeping your property tax payments low. To qualify, you must acquire your new home through a sale transaction. If you acquire any portion of the new property by gift or inheritance, you will not be able to transfer your base year value.

Property Tax Relief for All Californians

Proposition 13 – 34% Against Versus 62.6% For

On June 6, 1978 Proposition 13 passed as a property tax relief measure with 4,280,689 votes for – versus 2,326,167 votes against. In the final analysis, it came down to finally taking a great deal of power away from the County Tax Collectors; and giving it back to taxpayers!

Howard Jarvis and Paul Gann, were the best known Proposition 13 advocates. Officially known as the “People’s Initiative to Limit Property Taxation”,  also referred to as the Jarvis-Gann Amendment,  Proposition 13 was listed for voters through the so-called “California ballot initiative process” – which allows a constitutional amendment to be offered to voters when political advocates assemble a certain number of signatures on  a petition.     

For Once, Tax Relief for the Middle Class in California – Not Special Interests

Many people aren’t aware of the fact that Mr. Jarvis was a hugely successful residential apt. building owner, and Mr. Gann, a political activist who passed away from HIV due to infected blood from a unfortunate transfusion, who ironically devoted the last several years of his life to AIDS treatment advocacy – in direct opposition to his fellow conservatives. California’s “Paul Gann Blood Safety Act” was passed into law in 1990, mandating that doctors discuss the risks of blood transfusion with their patients.

Two non-politicians named Howard Jarvis and Paul Gann courageously soldiered on – without precedence – until they won the day. This rarely occurs in political circles, as we all know.  But for once, some non-politicians actually changed things for the better in California. And virtually overnight, once Howard Jarvis and his so-called “Tax Revolt” passed Proposition 13, property tax rates in California finally became predictable and equitable – from San Jose to San Francisco and beyond, in all 58 counties.

Under this new property tax relief measure, the property tax rate is now set at a uniform 1% throughout the state, and property tax increases are limited to no more than 2% a year as long as the property is not sold.

Previously, the tax rate in California averaged almost 3% of market value, and there were no limits on increases either for the tax rate or property value assessments. Some properties were reassessed 50% to 100% higher in just one year, so property owners’ tax bills skyrocketed, often  way beyond homeowners’ ability to pay their property taxes.

Now, once sold, property is reassessed at 1% of the new market value (usually the sales price) with a 2% cap on annual tax increases. As a result, new buyers are always aware of what their taxes will be and know the maximum amount property taxes can increase each year for as long as they own the property. 

Then, in 1986, Amendment Proposition 58 was passed; and  homeowners as well as beneficiaries inheriting property from parents could happily take advantage of a transfer of property between siblings or sibling-to-sibling property transfer in conjunction with an irrevocable trust loan, typically for buying out inherited property shares from siblings, while keeping a low property tax base (now used with California Proposition 19 which has replaced Proposition 58). 

Overnight, beneficiaries  could transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes; and could keep parents property taxes after a property tax transfer made possible by a parent-child transfer, officially a parent-to-child exclusion which, exactly like buying out inherited property shares, is also now governed by Proposition 19.  

Benefits for Non Property Owners

While Proposition 13 is mainly famous for capping property taxes in California, it also stops arbitrary tax hikes at the state and local level. It makes sure that any state tax increase had to be approved by a 2/3 majority in the Legislature, and any new or increased local taxation must be approved by voters, not just a collection of special interest politicians.

Supplemented by Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association – a co-sponsored tax measure entitled Proposition 218 (the Right to Vote on Taxes Act) makes sure that voter approval of all new local taxes is required, no matter what. So not just property owners, but also renters, benefit – as Proposition 13 stabilizes property taxes, making them predictable and reasonably controlled; reducing any uncontrolled or unexpected rent increases throughout the state of California.

Leaving Heirs Property & Assets in a Trust to Avoid Sibling Conflict

Conflict Among Heirs Inheriting Assets

Squabbling among siblings frequently erupts right after a parent passes away… when the time comes to divvy up real property shares, investment and liquid assets, as well as cash in an estate.  Moreover,  this in-fighting often results in lengthy and expensive litigation.  

Therefore, to set the estate stage properly, to organize the equitable sale of all assets and valuables, to equally split real property, cash accounts, investments, and liquid assets… plus correctly establish productive, two-way communication among siblings prone to conflict and squabbling over money, with an objective, neutral party or familiar family lawyer to act as a mediator to resolve inheritance conflicts among siblings after a decedent has passed away.

However, when middle class parents pass away, leaving a home to several beneficiaries when there is little else to inherit, this frequently results in a heated conflict between one or more siblings who want to sell their inherited home, and the siblings who insist on keeping their family house along with parents’ low property tax base.  As we all know, this can lead to a protracted, bitter battle of wits and words.

An Irrevocable Trust: Working in Conjunction with Proposition 19

The one proven solution to this sort of struggle, to end the squabbling for good, is for one side, generally the beneficiaries looking to keep their inherited home, a loan to a trust to buyout siblings looking to sell their inherited share, buying out sibling property shares, with a sibling to sibling property transfer, avoiding property tax reassessment and keeping a low property tax base. 

Generally a high six-figure or low seven-figure loan from a trust lender to an irrevocable trust works in conjunction with Proposition 19, leaving beneficiaries who are keeping the family house with a Proposition 13 protected, low property tax base. 

This avoids the need to work with a broker or realtor, therefore avoids a 6% commission, legal fees, transaction charges, etc. – providing a good deal more cash to the beneficiaries trying to sell the home than an outside buyer would tend to offer, or could offer.

Resolving Sibling Conflicts with Trust Based Estate Planning

That is to say, thinking ahead to resolve sibling conflicts. Planning an estate with a concrete will and/or trust, with heirs in mind, prior to death can avoid many of the problems between siblings after a surviving parent passes away.

If a parent leaves concrete instructions in a trust and/or a will as to which sibling receives what in terms of cash accounts, real estate, personal property, investments, antiques, lucrative artwork, liquid assets, valuables, important jewelry; etc.

A wise parent will leave clear instructions how a house is to be inherited, or possibly how it is to be sold, and how the proceeds are to be divided. Some siblings may receive more than others; some or one may be disinherited. All of these decisions may result in bitter conflicts later on.

Planning in Advance to Thwart Mercenary Heirs 

Obviously, leaving an even share of assets, valuables, cash, and real property, in black and white,  in a will and/or trust,  would tend to avoid conflict – however this may not be what the decedent wanted.  And even if all inherited assets are split evenly, there are often greedy heirs who want more, and manipulate to get more. And this is where a trust loan buyout can come in handy, with the assistance of a trust lender.

A parent can leave a revocable trust that can be changed at any time up to death, placing property in the joint name of a parent and child so that a bank account, brokerage account, or real estate can pass automatically to children/beneficiaries when the parent dies – to avoid conflict.

Using a cordial executor or trustee for the estate who does not gain anything in any way can also help avoid conflicts, although sometimes they start them! So choosing the right person becomes a critical decision for the parent.

Repealing California’s Death Tax

Repealing California's Death Tax

Since the passage of California Proposition 19, more and more families are receiving notices that the death of a parent has triggered reassessment of a family property and sharply increased their property tax bill. In an attempt to stem this, the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association has filed a ballot initiative with the Attorney General’s office to repeal California’s Death Tax.

In November of 2020, many voters were unaware that California Proposition 19 included a provision that affected inter-generational transfers of homes. Prior to California Proposition 19’s passage, a parent could transfer a home of any value plus up to $1 million of assessed value of other property to their children, without reassessment to market value. However, effective February 16, 2021, this is no longer the case.

The Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association is fighting to modify Prop 19 and restore the ability of parents to pass property to their children without any change to their tax bill. Commercial Loan Corporation is working with them to gather the signatures required to get it on the ballot. The new initiative is titled the Repeal the Death Tax Act. It would reverse the Proposition 19 changes to the rules affecting inter-generational transfers. To further protect California families, the measure includes an inflation adjustment for properties in addition to the primary residence. Up to $2.4 million of assessed value would be excluded from reassessment upon transfer, offering significant tax benefits to families that own small business properties or rental units for income. A primary residence of any value would be excluded from reassessment.

If you are interested in helping collect signatures and think that you can collect several, you can have a petition mailed to you along with complete instructions on how to do so. The deadline to collect the necessary signatures is April 29, 2022 so the time to act is now to repeal California’s Death Tax!

You can request a petition online here, or call Commercial Loan Corporation at 877-464-1066 for more details.

Does a Change in Ownership Affect CA Property Taxes?

California Change in Property Ownership

California Change in Property Ownership

Californians who make it their business to know – now understand that triggering property tax reassessment to “a new Base Year Value” as a result of new construction to a home, or a complete change in ownership – which makes it virtually impossible to establish  a low property tax base; and results in a yearly tax rate that increases abruptly to  current or “fair market” rates.

Translation in everyday language – you pay much higher property taxes every year. For example, the different between $600 per year and $9,000 per year. Significantly higher property taxes.

Every County Tax Assessor in California, in all fifty-eight counties, records and reviews every single property deed in every county, to figure out which homes and various other real properties require reappraisal, and which do not. The Tax Assessors also determine ownership changes with other investigative tools such as such as kept records from homeowner self-reporting, or from records of building permits; from newspaper files; or field inspections.

When a County Tax Assessor has determined that a property has changed ownership, Proposition 13 stipulates that the County Tax Assessor must reassess that property to its current (i.e., fair market) tax rate, as per the date of change of ownership.

Because property taxes in California are based on a property’s assessed value – at the time of acquisition – the property taxes will be increased if the current market rate is higher than the original assessed Prop 13 base year value adjustment. Therefore – if the current market tax rate is lesser than the previous adjusted base year value assessment, then taxes on that property will go down. Which is what everyone wants.

It is important to note, however, that a portion of ownership of that property may be reappraised. Let’s say that 50% of a home is transferred under Proposition 13, and the changes that the Tax Assessor is going to reassess is 50% of the home at the current market rate, as per the transfer date, so 50% will be deducted from the base year value, under Proposition 13 property tax relief… 

Typically, when someone buys a home, the home goes through a “change in ownership” and 100% of the home is reassessed at full current market value.   Even if the outcome of transferring real estate is a change in ownership, there are a number of exclusions from paying current tax rates – and so certain homes or other real estate will often not be be reappraised under these sorts of home transfers.

If a property owner files the proper claim, an exclusion from paying updated current property taxes will kick in as long the owner’s property, or portions of this property, are correctly excluded from reassessment.

The best way to cover changes in ownership that are excluded from automatic reassessment, or reassessment by claim; is to enlist the help of a tax attorney, a property tax consultant, or a trust lender who specializes in establishing a low property tax base for heirs upon inheriting a home from a parent.

Frequently, this will assist beneficiaries in buying out inherited property shares from co-beneficiaries through a loan to an irrevocable trust, which realtors and property tax specialists call a transfer of property between siblings or a sibling-to-sibling property transfer – working in conjunction with a California Proposition 19  parent to child property tax transfer on an inherited home – a parent-to-child exclusion (from property tax reassessment at full, current market rates), to establish a low property tax base.  

Naturally, this line of property tax relief, based on a parent’s property  also includes the ability to transfer property taxes when inheriting property taxes from a parent. Under these tax breaks, a property tax transfer like this can help heirs keep parents’ property taxes basically forever, based on a parent-child transfer; or a parent to child exclusion from reassessment – to legally avoid property tax reassessment.

You can always consult your Tax Assessor, however it is generally in the Tax Assessor’s best interest to charge you the maximum amount possible. A property tax consultant or trust lender, on the other hand, is motivated to save you money on taxes, not see you spend more.

Understanding New Property Tax Relief Law in California

California Property Tax Transfer Law

California Property Tax Transfer Law

Using Reassessment to Your Advantage

Have you considered that property reassessment can sometimes work in your favor? For example, if property values drop. While we would prefer to see the value of our house increase, at least in a down market as our property value goes down – and so do property taxes. 

We’ll always take the point of view that property taxes should be lower. So if our property value drops, future increases would not be limited to Proposition 13’s popular 2% maximum increase every year. Yet if we transfer the property to someone else and regrettably trigger property reassessment, we can reset the property tax basis and future increases to the lower value.

If we find ourselves in that position with a taxable estate, we can think about transferring our property out of the estate. This will reset the property tax basis to a lower value – potentially reducing estate taxes. It’s certainly worth thinking about. Owning our own home is the classic California dream… The classic American dream. So being able to pass along that investment usually makes a great deal of sense to most of us.

Proposition 19 Replacing Previous Property Tax Benefits

As most Californians know by now, on Nov 3, 2020, CA voters approved Proposition 19 – a constitutional amendment verbosely titled the “Home Protection for Seniors, Severely Disabled, Families and Victims of Wildfire or Natural Disasters Act.”

The benefits are relatively simple and straight forward… With Prop 19 more or less replacing and continuing the Proposition 58 parent-to-child exclusion from paying current property tax rates; voted into law in 1986. With the right to keep parents property taxes on a property tax transfer, when inheriting property taxes… taking advantage of an inexpensive property tax transfer, in other words a parent-to-child property tax transfer measure called a parent-child exclusion.  Along with Proposition 193, an amendment passed by voters in 1996, allowing grandparent-to-grandchild transfer exclusions from current property tax reassessment.

Proposition 19 also replaced and continues tax breaks from Proposition 60 (passed in 1986) and Proposition 90 (voted into law in 1988) – both property tax measures enabling home transfers by seniors over age 55 – as well as replacing and continuing Proposition 110 (voted into law in 1990), as a tax measure enabling an exclusion from property reassessment for severely disabled residents.

To be clear, Proposition 19 enables residents to an inexpensive property tax transfer – to inherit family properties and keep a low property tax base on their parent’s home that they are able to move into as their primary residence. This new property tax relief also lets homeowners who are over age 55, extremely disabled, or victims of a wildfire or governor confirmed natural disaster to transfer the assessed value of their primary home to a newly purchased or newly constructed replacement primary residence up to three times in a lifetime.

With Proposition 19 taking over property tax breaks from the wildly popular CA Proposition 58, it bears repeating that the parent-child exclusion and inexpensive property tax transfer can be taken advantage of only when an heir inherits a home from a parent that was using that same property as a primary residence, not a vacation home – with an entire year to comfortably move into that parental home, as a primary residence.

New Property Tax Relief Benefits for Californians

However, homeowners also have the ability to file for a “homeowner’s exemption” as long as the home in question has been the principal residence of the owner as of Jan 1 of that tax year. A new owner will automatically receive an exemption claim form in the mail and there is no cost to file. To receive 100% of this $7,000 exemption a new property owner has to file with the local County Tax Assessor by Feb 15 of that year.

As most Californians know by now, we can’t take advantage of the parent-to-child exclusion if our inherited house is going to be used as a vacation home, rented out to tourists, rather than a primary residence. Fortunately, if the home is inherited by numerous children of a parent, only one heir needs to reside there to take advantage of an – the exclusion.

Moreover, a parent can shelter $1,000,000 of increased value from reassessment. Any appreciation above that will be added to the property tax assessed. In other words, if a primary residence is assessed today at $500,000 however is valued at $1,500,000, an heir inheriting the residence as a primary residence will keep the same property tax assessed value of $500,000. Fortunately for families in the agriculture business, this new limitation also impacts family farms.

These new property tax breaks applied to any transfer of California real estate after Feb 15, 2021, as a gift or an inheritance at death. They also apply to an irrevocable trust (such as a Qualified Personal Residence Trust or a trust created for your benefit by a predeceased spouse) that owns California real property and that will pass to children in the future.

Moreover, it’s fortunate mainly for middle class, upper middle class, and working families that a large loan to an irrevocable trust can still also be used by beneficiaries who wish to keep a parental home they’re inheriting at their parents’ low property tax base, when taking advantage of Proposition 19 (formerly the popular Proposition 58 tax break) to buyout co-beneficiaries, also referred to as buying out sibling property shares – looking to sell their inherited share of the same property, a – typically at a much higher sale price than an outside buyer would offer. The 6% realtor commission, attorney fees, closing costs, cosmetic improvements to please buyers, and other ancillary charges – all disappear when a trust loan from a trust lender furnishes the funding for a sibling buyout.

When you have a reliable trust lender at your side to make buying out sibling co-beneficiaries possible – it pays to keep it in the family.

What is The Role of a CA Property Tax Consultant?

California Property Tax Consultant

The Role of a California Property Tax Consultant

What Property Tax Consultants Provide

This article provides an overview on property tax consulting and the benefits that come with enlisting the help of a property tax consultant with expertise in California property tax relief, among other key issues.

To begin with, County Property Tax Assessors – as every homeowner or relevant property owner, new beneficiary and estate heir in California knows – are solely responsible for implementing property tax assessments in their county. The County Assessor is also who one has to deal with when negotiating or submitting a property tax appeal, or filing various related paperwork; or to confirm deadline dates for filings.

However, we find that most homeowners and property owning landlords wind up enlisting the help of a tax appeal firm, or a professional property tax consultant to mitigate what they believe are property tax overcharges, to minimize their long-term property tax burden on a residence or an inherited home.

As many Californians know, property tax consultants frequently handle Tax Assessor negotiations or litigation issues for homeowners and business property owners; and often refer homeowners and beneficiaries to a trust lender, to take advantage of an irrevocable trust loan, while keeping a parents low property tax base.

And as many residents are aware, a loan to an irrevocable trust also works jointly with a parent-to-child exclusion from Proposition 19 (i.e., formerly Proposition 58) and as we mentioned a moment ago keeping a low property tax base while retaining an inherited home from a parent… Also being able to buyout inherited property shares from a co-beneficiary intent on selling their inherited property – for far more cash than an outside buyer would offer.  So in a sense, property tax consultants are aiding both estate heirs and trust beneficiaries looking to buyout siblings’ inherited property, as well as the siblings, or co-beneficiaries, interested in selling out. 

As most Californians that own property know, property tax relief  under Proposition 19 mainly revolves around  the property tax transfer measure, more specifically the parent-child transfer and  protected right to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property and inheriting property taxes, generally with the ability to keep parents property taxes basically for as long as one resides in a primary residence – initiated by the parent-to-child exclusion.

CA Property Tax Consultants: Popular Categories

There are different types of property tax consulting services. Some consultants are experienced appraisers, with expertise in both residential and non-residential corporate real property evaluation. Some companies lack the expertise to some up with their own property tax valuation assessments on their own, and so hire property tax valuation consultants to produce customized property tax assessments for them.

On the other hand, there are “strategy consultants” who can negotiate property tax appeals, help with tax reduction planning, and handle payments for property owners. There are also property tax consultants that concentrate on helping property owners with compliance issues, assembling data and preparing documents to file with the County Assessor.

Michael Wyatt Consulting: General Practice CA Property Tax Consultants

Many property tax consultants offer a combination of services. This is generally the best type of property tax consultant to work with, as they are a lot less limited, in terms of what they can offer you and your family. It’s often helpful to look closely at an actual property tax consultant in California to get a real-life sense of what a professional service like this can actually offer.

For example, let’s take a look at the Michael Wyatt Consulting firm in Corona, California. Since 1978, this boutique firm has specialized in commercial and real estate appraisal, as well as property taxes and property tax relief, custom property research, real estate finance, real estate law, and real estate market analysis, site planning, and entitlements.

Setting them aside from many property tax consultants in California, this particular firm, and most generalist property tax consulting firms like them, will review your real property values every year, getting a fresh look at the status of whatever specific issues are in focus or at stake. If there are proposed property transactions in the works, a reliable property tax consultant will look at that transaction from every angle, to avoid property tax assessment.

Moreover, an on-staff general property tax consultant will always take time to respond to a client’s various needs, such as researching an issue that requires deeper investigation to ensure that all “t’s” are crossed and all “i’s” are dotted; and will always look carefully at any real estate deeds or other related items to make sure all data and numbers are completely accurate before committing final tallies and results to writing, and/or filing with the Tax Assessor.

Generalist tax consultants also tend to stand in as a “middle-man” between you, the property owner, and the Tax Assessor, coordinating your accepted fee payment – or your property tax appeal – and will complete all communications and filings with the County Tax Assessor’s office… and/or any other required government entity or agency.

Like all established, seasoned property tax consultants, the Michael Wyatt Consulting firm provides property owning clients with the knowledge they’ll need to make informed, correct real estate and/or property tax decisions – in order to meet all financial and residency challenges head on; in a timely and cost-effective manner.

Communicating With County Tax Assessors Throughout California

Additional benefits homeowners receive from working with property tax consultants include the ability to make good use of an experienced consultant’s in-depth knowledge of valuation principles, negotiating dispassionately and successfully with Tax Assessors concerning property tax breaks such as the Proposition 19 (formerly Prop 58) parent-child exclusion or assess and apply Proposition 19 tax relief measures that come with being over age 55, being severely disabled, or from owning a primary residence that was destroyed by a natural disaster like a flood or an earthquake, or a forest-fire.

Both homeowners and companies look to property tax consultants to help them put together a customized property tax relief strategy, based on the location of their home or properties’ and to present that plan effectively to the local County Tax Assessor.

A competent property tax consultant should be able to provide expertise on a transfer of a primary residence’s property tax base value to a replacement residence of any value, or to expand tax benefits for the transfer of a family farm — anywhere in California, which calls for new benefits and is highly complex, requiring rather specific expertise.

Awareness of Big-Picture Views and Legislative Issues

It is part of a property tax consultant’s job to lower the value of a property for a homeowner or a business, and to communicate this properly and effectively to a Tax Assessor, and to research challenging issues if necessary, and comprehend different industry categories whenever required.

Not only must a property tax consultant be knowledgeable about property taxes and property tax relief – the property tax consultant must also maintain a big-picture view of state or county legislation that may be looming in the future, and that may affect real estate in your particular county or region – or even possibly in the state of California, if statewide issues happen to be at stake.

Property tax consultants are occasionally also estate attorneys, and typically are compliant with Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) standards; and maintain a good reputation you can check on in the property tax industry associations and non-profit organizations.

Popular Reasons Why California Beneficiaries Get a Trust Loan

California Trust Loans

California Trust Loans

Typically, beneficiaries who are seeking a mid to high six-figure or low seven-figure loan to an irrevocable trust are looking to accomplish an important outcome that is generally not possible with other types of financing such as inheritance advance assignments, credit union financing or personal bank loans – as reviewed below…

What Type of Trust Lender do You Want to Work With?

Families buying out sibling property shares while keeping your inherited home at a low Proposition 13 tax base typically enlist the help of an experienced California trust lender that is self-funded. Beneficiaries generally want a self-funded lender as they deliver funding at a faster rate than institutional lenders, such as five to seven days, versus three to four weeks. They also offer terms that are more flexible than an institutional lender such as Bank of America or Wells Fargo. Their compliance requirements for both commercial and residential property owners are also less restrictive than traditional lenders.

Self-funded trust lenders seldom charge up-front fees, they do not require borrowers to pay advance interest on their trust loan; and there is never a “due-on-sale” clause that requires the mortgage to be repaid in full when the property is sold. Lastly, beneficiaries like the fact that this type of firm does not impose an “alienation clause”… in the event of a property transfer, insisting that the borrower has to pay back the mortgage in full before the borrower can transfer the property to another person. Estate and trust attorneys, or property tax consultants will always advise beneficiary clients to avoid these types of restrictive and costly requirements.

Buying Out Property Shares Inherited By Co-Beneficiaries

Generally this option revolves around a common family or sibling conflict that typically has beneficiaries insisting on selling their inherited property shares, while other beneficiaries are looking to keep the family homes, and are enlisting the help of a trust lender to buyout siblings who are determined to sell.

This method of funding provides the beneficiaries looking to sell with a good deal more money than a realtor will get them, with more cash from a trust loan and trust lender than an outside buyer would come up with… Avoiding an expensive, standard 6% realtor commission, avoiding closing costs, legal costs, and processing fees.

This type of family conflict is stressful, however the trust loan process provides a win-win solution for all concerned – keeping property at a low base rate for those who are retaining their parent’s home, and putting a lot more cash in the pocket, as far as beneficiaries who are intent on selling their inherited property shares are concerned.  The trust lender funds the trust and provides “equalized distribution” so every sibling who is selling their shares receives an equal amount.

Avoiding Property Tax Reassessment

Beneficiaries looking to keep their inherited family home, while buying out siblings that are looking to sell off their inherited property shares with personal funds, will discover quickly enough that this is not a viable option. Siblings who wish to keep their family home must avoid triggering reassessment, hence using a loan to an irrevocable trust is the most beneficial option, keeping property at a low base rate, or walking off with a lot more cash from selling inherited property shares. Depending which side of the fence you’re on.

As a CA homeowner – how do you ensure, as with a parent-child transfer, that you’re not paying more property tax than you should?  New homeowners must take the right steps in the beginning to keep the low property tax base their parents had, avoiding property tax reassessment at high current rates.  Without trust loan funding, the transaction would be viewed as a “sibling-to-sibling transfer” and thus would not avoid property reassessment. 

A beneficiary keeping the inherited home winds up saving on average $6,200 in yearly property taxes.  Borrowing against an irrevocable trust ensures that the process moves directly through the estate and locks in a low property tax rate. Closely related property tax benefits – that beneficiaries and new homeowners need  to get extremely familiar with – stem from Proposition 13 as well as Proposition 58;  and have morphed rapidly into Proposition 19…  

This all begins with basic property tax transfer… meaning the ability to keep parents property taxes, keeping property at a low base rate through the parent-child transfer and parent-to-child exclusion.  Beneficiaries, and believe it or not their estate attorney, absolutely have to know all about their right to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting parents property and inheriting property taxes from Mom or Dad…

Paying Trust Expenses

For beneficiaries, when a trustee passes away, there is often not enough cash or “liquidity” in an estate or in a trust to pay debts an initial trustee owed, such as attorney fees, medical bills, mortgage and personal loan debt, and other financial obligations. A trust loan can help resolve these debts.

Renting or Selling Inherited Property

If heirs or beneficiaries decide they’d like to rent out an inherited property, there are often maintenance costs and repairs to be considered. Especially when dealing with an inherited homes, age is an issue… hence there are often roof issues, boiler problems, pipes to be replaces, and so on. Before one is able to put an older home on the market to rent or to sell.

Irrevocable trust loans and Proposition 19 property tax exclusion, working in conjunction with each other,  insures that beneficiaries and new homeowners can get these fairly complicated tasks  accomplished in a relatively easy, stress-free and inexpensive manner.