What’s Good for California? Property Tax Revenue… or Property Tax Relief?

Property Taxes in California

Property Taxes in California

2021 forward, those in leadership roles in the state of California really should to get one thing straight. Middle class homeowners, working families, and even upper middle class property owners – which accounts for most of the state, frankly – do not need more property   tax hikes, and they do not need to be reaching deep into their pockets to be sending yet more tax revenue to the state; especially during a virulent pandemic, where middle class property owners are not getting any richer, nor (as the saying goes) are they getting any younger.
 
With so many people still furloughed, reduced to part-time work, or “temporarily” laid off… with more folks than you might think at 100% unemployed status… with a fair amount of companies shrinking their work force, with some even going completely out of business or leaving the state to set up shop in a nearby state where taxes are lower and property less expensive, plus lower overall cost of living. 

Therefore, with survival at the top of most peoples’ list, middle class families in California are not particularly interested in reading about all the billions going into the state coffers as a result of new property tax measures, in editorials and articles in local newspapers…

On the contrary, homeowners are far more interested in saving money through long-term, time tested California property tax breaks – often with information provided by seasoned property tax consultants like Michael Wyatt Consulting in Corona, and attorneys with decades of property tax relief expertise such as Rachelle Lee-Warner, Esq. at Cunningham Legal trust administration, estate-law firm in Auburn; or estate & trust lenders like Commercial Loan Corp in Newport Beach.

These firms help beneficiaries that are inheriting property from a parent save many  thousands of dollars every year by taking advantage of a (formerly Proposition 58) Prop 19 parent-child exclusion – working in conjunction with an irrevocable trust loan, making it possible to avoid property tax reassessment – buying out sibling property shares while keeping your inherited home at a low Proposition 13 tax base – buying out co-beneficiaries that are looking to sell off their inherited property shares for substantially more cash than an outside buyer would offer, which is the extra bonus. 

Firms like this will guide families through a Prop 19 parent-child exclusion and property tax transfer when inheriting property taxes, with the ability to transfer parents property taxes and keep parents property taxes through the parent-child transfer.

Every property owner and beneficiary should have reliable access to a firm that can lend money to an irrevocable trust – typically a trust loan lender.  Every  property owner in California should also have access to property tax appeals and property tax reduction, from boutique property tax relief companies. 

When we read local news or editorials, we’re encouraged to think about how wonderful all the extra property tax revenue is for California, and how helpful it is for local firemen and school boards, and how fortunate it is for realtors and well connected companies with special interest construction contracts.  Neither commercial property owners and homeowners don’t have the luxury of thinking about the state government’s terrific success at driving more tax revenue into the coffers from well disguised property tax hikes!

All property owners in California should have locked in rights to keep their yearly property taxes low, and when inheriting a home from parents and inheriting parents’ property taxes — to establish a low property tax base that will last literally forever. This is the most important safety net middle class and even upper middle class residents and beneficiaries have in the state of California… and should be focused specifically on taking advantage  that, not on the states’ fabulous increases in property tax revenue.

Popular Reasons Why California Beneficiaries Get a Trust Loan

California Trust Loans

California Trust Loans

Typically, beneficiaries who are seeking a mid to high six-figure or low seven-figure loan to an irrevocable trust are looking to accomplish an important outcome that is generally not possible with other types of financing such as inheritance advance assignments, credit union financing or personal bank loans – as reviewed below…

What Type of Trust Lender do You Want to Work With?

Families buying out sibling property shares while keeping your inherited home at a low Proposition 13 tax base typically enlist the help of an experienced California trust lender that is self-funded. Beneficiaries generally want a self-funded lender as they deliver funding at a faster rate than institutional lenders, such as five to seven days, versus three to four weeks. They also offer terms that are more flexible than an institutional lender such as Bank of America or Wells Fargo. Their compliance requirements for both commercial and residential property owners are also less restrictive than traditional lenders.

Self-funded trust lenders seldom charge up-front fees, they do not require borrowers to pay advance interest on their trust loan; and there is never a “due-on-sale” clause that requires the mortgage to be repaid in full when the property is sold. Lastly, beneficiaries like the fact that this type of firm does not impose an “alienation clause”… in the event of a property transfer, insisting that the borrower has to pay back the mortgage in full before the borrower can transfer the property to another person. Estate and trust attorneys, or property tax consultants will always advise beneficiary clients to avoid these types of restrictive and costly requirements.

Buying Out Property Shares Inherited By Co-Beneficiaries

Generally this option revolves around a common family or sibling conflict that typically has beneficiaries insisting on selling their inherited property shares, while other beneficiaries are looking to keep the family homes, and are enlisting the help of a trust lender to buyout siblings who are determined to sell.

This method of funding provides the beneficiaries looking to sell with a good deal more money than a realtor will get them, with more cash from a trust loan and trust lender than an outside buyer would come up with… Avoiding an expensive, standard 6% realtor commission, avoiding closing costs, legal costs, and processing fees.

This type of family conflict is stressful, however the trust loan process provides a win-win solution for all concerned – keeping property at a low base rate for those who are retaining their parent’s home, and putting a lot more cash in the pocket, as far as beneficiaries who are intent on selling their inherited property shares are concerned.  The trust lender funds the trust and provides “equalized distribution” so every sibling who is selling their shares receives an equal amount.

Avoiding Property Tax Reassessment

Beneficiaries looking to keep their inherited family home, while buying out siblings that are looking to sell off their inherited property shares with personal funds, will discover quickly enough that this is not a viable option. Siblings who wish to keep their family home must avoid triggering reassessment, hence using a loan to an irrevocable trust is the most beneficial option, keeping property at a low base rate, or walking off with a lot more cash from selling inherited property shares. Depending which side of the fence you’re on.

As a CA homeowner – how do you ensure, as with a parent-child transfer, that you’re not paying more property tax than you should?  New homeowners must take the right steps in the beginning to keep the low property tax base their parents had, avoiding property tax reassessment at high current rates.  Without trust loan funding, the transaction would be viewed as a “sibling-to-sibling transfer” and thus would not avoid property reassessment. 

A beneficiary keeping the inherited home winds up saving on average $6,200 in yearly property taxes.  Borrowing against an irrevocable trust ensures that the process moves directly through the estate and locks in a low property tax rate. Closely related property tax benefits – that beneficiaries and new homeowners need  to get extremely familiar with – stem from Proposition 13 as well as Proposition 58;  and have morphed rapidly into Proposition 19…  

This all begins with basic property tax transfer… meaning the ability to keep parents property taxes, keeping property at a low base rate through the parent-child transfer and parent-to-child exclusion.  Beneficiaries, and believe it or not their estate attorney, absolutely have to know all about their right to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting parents property and inheriting property taxes from Mom or Dad…

Paying Trust Expenses

For beneficiaries, when a trustee passes away, there is often not enough cash or “liquidity” in an estate or in a trust to pay debts an initial trustee owed, such as attorney fees, medical bills, mortgage and personal loan debt, and other financial obligations. A trust loan can help resolve these debts.

Renting or Selling Inherited Property

If heirs or beneficiaries decide they’d like to rent out an inherited property, there are often maintenance costs and repairs to be considered. Especially when dealing with an inherited homes, age is an issue… hence there are often roof issues, boiler problems, pipes to be replaces, and so on. Before one is able to put an older home on the market to rent or to sell.

Irrevocable trust loans and Proposition 19 property tax exclusion, working in conjunction with each other,  insures that beneficiaries and new homeowners can get these fairly complicated tasks  accomplished in a relatively easy, stress-free and inexpensive manner.

The History of Property Tax Relief in California

California Property Taxes

California Property Taxes

An Historical View of Property Tax Relief

A property tax measure entitled “Proposition 13” locked in property tax relief in 1978 that, despite efforts from certain parties to turn the clock backwards for financial reasons, California has managed somehow to maintain for middle class and upper middle class homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting parental property.

This tax relief process, along with Proposition 58 in 1986, providing residents with a means to establish a low property tax base, and to transfer a home from parent to heir with a parent-to-child exclusion from paying current property tax rates…. While keeping a low parental property tax base.

Traditional banking and other lending institutions no longer provide Californians with loans that solve financial requirements for irrevocable trusts, estates, probates, conservators, and other non-traditional inheritors and borrowers. We now must look to Trust Lenders to bridge this financing gap when it pertains to funding trusts, to buyout co-beneficiaries, siblings typically… as well as locking in a Proposition 13 protected low property tax base, with tax rates that cannot exceed 2%.

Property tax breaks like property tax transfers and the parent-to-child exclusion; the right to transfer property taxes that cemented the foundation of Proposition 58 – now in the foundation of Proposition 19…. With some restrictions that, regrettably, many Californians were not fully aware of when they cast their property tax vote in Nov of 2020.

Property Tax Relief – Involving Prop 13 & Prop 19 Trust Loans

The process that makes up the robust foundation of Prop 13 and Proposition 58, now Proposition 19, has managed to survive despite fluctuations and changes throughout 2020 and 2021, enabling funding of a trust or estate to allow equalization of distribution to beneficiaries inheriting property that are looking to sell out their property shares; while those looking to keep inherited property get to establish a low property tax base, and avoid property reassessment.

Your situation may reflect elements sin one or more of the following inheritance scenarios – frequently requiring a non-traditional solution; typically an inheritance funding assignment, or the funding of an irrevocable trust… Trust lenders like Commercial Loan Corp offer a free consultation in which some of the following scenarios and options will most likely be discussed – 

a) Siblings may be going through intra-family conflicts concerning which assessed evaluation of the property in question reflects the “true value of the property”; or confirming which beneficiaries want to keep inherited property, at their parent’s low property tax base – and which siblings insist on selling their property shares to a buyer, at which point it becomes obvious that a buyout from a trust will furnish beneficiaries looking to sell with far more cash than a typical buyer going through a realtor will provide – by avoiding a realtor’s 6% commission, additional fees, legal costs, etc. 

b) Does your family agree there is a need for a loan to an irrevocable trust, or an estate loan. An experienced trust lender is able to fund an intra-family trust that will furnish enough liquidity to equalize funding to all beneficiaries intent on selling off their inherited property shares… while at the same time establishing a low property tax base for heirs that are committed to keeping the family home — avoiding property reassessment in conjunction with Proposition 19.

c) Does your family agree to a specific loan amount required to liquidate an irrevocable trust; to “equalize” buyout cash for beneficiaries within a middle class or upper middle class family that wish to sell off their inherited property shares. Property value and whether or not all the siblings agree on the assessed evaluation, the amount of liquid assets in a trust, as well as the number of siblings set on selling their property shares — influence the liquidity requirements of an irrevocable trust.

d) “Funding equalization” and “cash distribution” should be reviewed during a free consultation – insuring that equalization will result in a sufficient amount of funds being directly distributed to all beneficiaries intent on selling their inherited property shares. Therefore, change of ownership will handled properly and filed to ensure an exclusion from reassessment (i.e., a “parent-to-child exclusion”, often called an “exemption”) – bottom line, making sure that the family can avoid property tax reassessment, keep parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes  becomes a reality.  Property tax transfer, the ability to keep parents property taxes, is still a bottom line property tax relief benefit in California.

The heir or beneficiaries keeping the home pays back the trust loan with personal funds, or with a conventional loan, or through some other means of repaying the irrevocable trust loan.  Keeping the finalization of the process as straight forward as possible. It must appear to be simple, and in a way actually be simple, or residents will shy away from it, if they can’t understand how it works, even in a general way.  

Time is Ripe to Become Better Acquainted With the Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer

California Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer

How to Obtain the California Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer


Avoiding Property Tax Reassessment & Property Tax Hikes


It is our consensus that normal middle class class residential owners, upper middle class home owners and working families, none of whom are generating a huge income at the moment, should most likely not be supplying the California state government with extra property tax revenue right now. 

This is especially true during a financial crisis such as the Covid predicament we find ourselves in during 2021… where revenue is tight all over the country, especially in California, with only a few exceptions here and there – where in general unemployment, as well as under-employment, is extremely high.

Regular middle class and upper middle class homeowners need to be saving money, and spending less, not spending more. Certainly not spending more on housing or standard goods and services, or on income tax or property taxes. We’re not talking about luxury goods or high-end services. That is specific to folks with disposable income, and is an entirely different matter altogether. 

As a matter of fact, property taxes are the one big-ticket item just mentioned that is easily lowered, or paused, or even deferred.   And if this never occurs, then property owners are going to have to be more cognizant of related details and new tax laws, as well as  new ways to avoid property tax reassessment – and tax specialists or real estate experts that are available in California to help with these matters.

Middle Class Property Tax Savings

When times are hard, as they are now, the state should help residents with key information on property tax breaks, helping property owners take full advantage of established property tax breaks, like the new Proposition 19 parent-to-child transfer and parent-to-child exclusion from reassessment of property taxes.

And this means not spending more on taxes when times are hard. Certainly, property owners should all be better informed about inheriting property taxes, and Prop 19 parent-to-child exclusion; about property tax breaks, and being able to transfer parents property taxes, with the right to keep parents property taxes on every property tax transfer.

Owning a Home is Part of the American Dream

Purchasing or inheriting a home is part of the classic American dream, and leaving part of that dream to heirs or beneficiaries is something most of us would be proud of.  However, fluid, ever-changing and complicated  property tax laws have to be kept up with, either by ourselves, or through specialists that make a living helping property owners with issues like property taxes.  

Getting expert property tax advice and estate planning advice can help save that dream, and help sustain good family financial practices for generations to come, where your home and other big ticket investments are concerned. 

Genuine Property Tax Relief

The property tax breaks middle class and upper middle class Californians are holding on to are the only safety-net solutions middle class residents have in this state, so the Legislature should be focusing on preserving and strengthening those tax breaks, and on educating and informing Californians about establishing a low tax base for trust beneficiaries; about Prop 19 parent-to-child exclusion and Proposition 19 – parent to child property tax transfer on an inherited home; plus Proposition 13 property tax transfers, as well as the Proposition 19 impact on CA homeowners, and avoiding property reassessment wherever possible – not on obsessively driving more tax revenue, under cloaked measures called “property tax relief” that are merely tax deferments.

Even when it means a little less property tax revenue going into their coffers, it shouldn’t matter to the state government.  In the long run, helping to preserve working families’ financial health and helping them to pay less property taxes, thereby building up more savings, will drive greater property tax revenue to the state, as more people will own homes and pay taxes!  This is what the Legislature would see if they saw long term rather than short term. 

All middle class Californians should be able to depend on secure, authentic property tax relief – like wealthy folks and corporations have in every state in America. Why should only the wealthy enjoy genuine tax cuts and real property tax breaks?

What is the Role of CPAs in Helping Residents With Prop 19 Establish a Low Property Tax Base

Inheriting Property Taxes in California

Inheriting Property Taxes in California

Inheriting Property Taxes in California From a CPA’s Expert Point of View

Many accountants and property tax consultants these days have reinvented themselves to some degree and have become Proposition 19, 2021 revised property tax relief experts for middle class families and beneficiaries inheriting real property, and for new homeowners in both the middle and upper middle class California income brackets. 

One such noted CA property tax relief expert and CPA, Komal Kabra from Chugh.net, has a lot of interesting things to say, from her focused CPA perspective on property taxes and property tax relief in California.  She tells us:  “Property tax law  protected by Proposition 13 levies property taxes based on a home’s original purchase price, even as the home’s value appreciates over time. Additionally, the law caps property tax at 1% of sale price, with a maximum 2% increase per year.” 

Under  new Proposition 19 property tax regulations, the number of times the tax rate can be transferred to a new home is now three times, versus once under previous tax law… if you are age 55 or older.  Value of the new home compared to the previous home can be any value; and the location of any new home can be anywhere in California. 

Admittedly, this is an excellent improvement offered by Proposition 19, however it is clear that the age issue must be seriously revisited  in the near future, and opened up to embrace younger age groups.  Although it is an interesting turnabout of American age bias, which is typically going the other way around, with bias against folks in the 50 to 60 age group and older. 

CPA Kabra goes on to say:  “Proposition 19, which delivers property tax savings to eligible property owners, including residents who are age 55 or older; Folks that suffer from severe disabilities and people who have lost their house in a wildfire or officially validated natural disaster, such as a dramatic flood or extreme earthquake.” 

Proposition 19 preserves all of these new property tax breaks, while also enabling eligible middle class and upper middle class property owners in California to transfer their lower “base year” property tax rate to a new home of any value, anywhere in the state,  up to three times – affecting homes purchased on or after April 1st of 2021.

Miss Kabra concludes, with a real-world example: “If an eligible homeowner purchases a home of a greater value than their previous home now, under Proposition 19, they will pay a blended tax rate. For example –  let’s take a middle class couple in their 60s, who own  a home worth $600,000 in Los Angeles, which they purchased in 1972 for $200,000.  Let’s say they sell their L.A. home, and purchase a new home for $700,000 in San Diego.  The first $600,000 of the new San Diego home will be taxed based on their original 1972 purchase price of $200,000.  Only the next $100,000 will be taxed based on current or “fair market” value…” 

Saving Money on Property Taxes With Help From the Experts!

There are other challenging property tax issues, as well as critical property tax relief advantages and property tax breaks, for middle class and upper middle class families to address, with which to avoid property tax reassessment, when inheriting property taxes in California…

New property tax relief advantages include the right to transfer parents property taxes and then keep parents property taxes when inheriting property and inheriting property taxes in California, associated with any standard property tax transfer; leading up to and through the parent-child transfer and parent-to-child exclusion (from carrying a “fair market”, or current, property tax burden).  Leading towards Keeping Your Parent’s Low Property Tax Base When Inheriting a Home; or inheriting a new primary residence that requires a transfer of a parent’s low property tax base. 

If done properly with a trust loan from a trust lender a low property tax base can remain in place for decades, when inheriting property taxes in California, saving residential or commercial property owners hundreds of thousands of dollars in the long run.

All the more reason for you to call a property tax consultant or a trust lender experienced in Parent To Child Property Tax Transfer On An Inherited Home as well as the use of irrevocable trust loans and Proposition 19, as well as Proposition 13, to keep your parent’s low property tax base – if you are inheriting a home, or expect to inherit a home at a low property tax rate; and plan to transfer a low property tax base to a new home down the road. 

Or, if you wish to buyout existing co-beneficiaries that are looking to sell their inherited  property shares, while you are set on keeping that same inherited property in the family – plus keeping the same low property tax base your parents enjoyed.  All of these important family issues are well worth careful consideration.

To learn more about your options when inheriting a house from parents – transferring their principle residence’s low property tax base to your new primary residence – call our main line to ask to  speak with a Trust Fund Loan or Property Tax Savings specialist at Property Tax News, the Michael Wyatt Consulting firm, or the Commercial Loan Corp, at (877) 756-4454 

How Has Prop 19 Changed Inheriting California Property and Home Ownership?

How Has Prop 19 Changed Inheriting California Property and Home Ownership?

How Has Prop 19 Changed Inheriting California Property and Home Ownership?

Proposition 19’s supporters would like to reduce Prop 13’s less attractive elements and implement what they would call, “freeing-up long-term homeowners.” 

Prop 19 is expected to generate increased house sales, as well as realtor and broker commissions, which is why Prop 19’s largest supporter, the California Realtors Association spent $40,400,341 to get Prop 19 passed, and the National Association of Realtors kicked in $4,800,000 to promote such a hard-to-sell property tax measure.  The $100,000 donated by the California Professional Firefighters union to Proposition 19 pales in comparison.

Proposition 13, which passed in a landslide way back in 1978, was a unique amendment to the California Constitution which capped residential property taxes on a primary residence to 1970s levels, capping them at 1% of assessed value (plus local additions, by county).  Assessments were allowed to rise at a maximum rate of 2% per year — even though prices on real estate in California continued to increase in most of the state’s 58 counties.

Properties would be reassessed at current market rates when a total change of ownership occurred, either by death, gift, or sale — when the property in question is “transferred”.  What the CA State Board of Equalization calls a “change in ownership.”  Deceptively simple terminology for a rather complex process; made even more complex these days by varying state taxes and Coronavirus issues, verified at property tax relief websites and niche blogs like Property Tax News or Loan To A Trust.

 Inheriting California real estate and home ownership in general is different now as far as property taxes are concerned.  If a homeowner in any county bought a $2,000,000 home today, without any property tax breaks, they might pay roughly $25,000+ per year in property taxes.  A family in a nearby $2,000,000 home that’s been there for let’s say 30 years may owe merely $2,500 per year.  But it’s all relative.  Certain politicians complain about this type of inequity… however  if you bought property 30 years ago, would the same property cost the same last week?  Of course not.  So why should taxes be any different.  

Under Proposition 19, the only low Proposition 13 tax base that can be transferred to your children is that of your principal residence to your heirs (offspring).  Subsequently,  your heirs have to reside in that home also as   their primary residence.  And if that inherited home is valued at more than $1,000,000 it may be partly or completely reassessed by the local  tax  assessor, with a partial or total loss of their Proposition 13 parent-to-child exclusion property tax break.  It is not entirely clear yet how all of this will shake out once the dust settles on this. 

However the entire concept of installing a property tax hike in the midst of a flagging Pandemic economy with growing unemployment and under-employment; or even the decision by the Legislature to  promote a Proposition 19 tax hike in 2021 — to water down middle class homeowners’ ability to avoid property tax reassessment is under a spotlight and being seriously questioned in light of basic survival, and even retirement, by respected economists, academics and analytical websites.   

In most cases, Proposition 19 will effectively eliminate a parent’s right to transfer a low property tax assessment to heirs, since it is unclear at this point how  many heirs or beneficiaries inheriting their parents’ home will be all that excited about  moving into that inherited home as a primary residence — and within 12 months at that. It may be too small for a large family.  Work places may be too far away to be convenient.  School districts could b e a major issue.  And so on. 

Moreover,  many homes are worth far more than $1,000,000 in California. That makes Proposition 19, despite it’s many positive benefits, a liability for many inheritors… with challenging  outcomes for certain taxpaying residents who have inherited California real estate.

The folks who benefit from Proposition 19 are embraced clearly in its’ promotional title: “Home Protection for Seniors, Severely Disabled and Victims of Wildfire or Natural Disasters Act.”  Exactly what the definition and application of  “severely disabled” is, remains to be seen.  As mostly everything with this particular Legislature, it would be safe to say that there are a lot more assumptions in play here than specific, concrete projections that are backed up by well researched data and factual analysis. 

We can assume that homeowners who are over the age of 55, disabled or supposedly “severely” disabled, who have been harmed by a forest fire or  some other natural disaster of some kind,  will be able to transfer the assessed value of their primary California residence to a new home anywhere within the state’s 58 counties. 

This revised property tax relief procedure may be repeated  three times in a lifetime, supposedly, and so homeowners now have two years to transfer their Prop 13 low property tax base.  And one can still expect (with more limitations now built into the process) to be able to take advantage of trust lenders with a loan to a trust if the goal is to buyout co-beneficiaries (i.e., siblings) looking to sell their inherited property shares, as a transfer of property between siblings, with a loan to an irrevocable trust. 

So no matter what, at least for the moment, Californians can still make good use of a property tax transfer from a parent, a Prop 13 low property tax base — under the CA Proposition 13 transfer of property — and transfer parents property taxes, with the sole objective to   keep parents property taxes regardless, when inheriting any kind of property more or less, and inheriting property taxes under California’s parent to child transfer, known as the  parent to child exclusion — which has been the number one target anti property tax relief parties want to  water down, or even repeal.                

Additionally,  if the homeowners’ new house is assessed at a higher value  than their previous home — their property taxes might go up, however not  as high as they would have been before Proposition 19 went into effect. So there is helpful property tax relief here if you look for it, such as being able to establish a Prop 13 low property tax base.  It is just not quite  as simple and straight-forward as it once was, before Proposition 19 more or less replaced Proposition 58 in the sunny state of California, in Nov. of 2021. 

The California Proposition 19 Newspaper Debate

California Proposition 19

California Proposition 19


The official California  “Voter Guide” (Official Voter Information Guide) tells us CA Proposition 19 actually protects Proposition 13 property tax savings; and “closes unfair tax loopholes used by wealthy out-of-state investors” — a subtle reference to East Coast investors, of which in reality there are relatively few families like this actually coming to California to inherit property from parents, under Proposition 13, and rent out to wealthy tourists. 

This exaggerated claim has already been dis-proven, yet folks that support Prop 19  and continuously question property tax relief and Proposition 13, continue to repeat this false claim in the media — even though most CA property owners back Prop 13 and Proposition 58.

Newspapers have weighed in recently on Proposition 19: in terms of support…  

• San Mateo Daily Journal: “This would enable people in high cost areas to move more easily, opening up room for new residents to the area.”

• The San Diego Union-Tribune: “While critics see this as a gift to the wealthy elderly, the great majority of older homeowners are middle-income, not rich. Allowing them (as well as disabled homeowners and wildfire or disaster victims) to downsize without suffering a huge property tax hit is a humane policy that helps people retire with much less financial stress. It would also promote fluidity in home sales, increasing the availability of larger homes for families with children and easing the phenomenon of Proposition 13 depressing the real estate free market by trapping empty-nesters in homes bigger than they need.”

And in opposition…

• Tahoe Daily Tribune: “It’s no secret that ballot initiatives can be confusing, but Proposition 19 takes obfuscation to a whole new level.  Voters can’t be blamed if they can’t remember whether Prop. 19 is the initiative that is a massive property tax hike or the measure that actually has something good for homeowners or the initiative that has something to do with firefighting. The fact is, all three are at least somewhat true — especially the part about the big tax increase.”

• Mercury News & East Bay Times Editorial Boards: “Prop. 19 merely plugs one hole in the state’s porous property tax laws while creating another. It’s time for holistic reform that simplifies the system and makes it more equitable. This isn’t it. The longer a person had owned their current home, and already benefited from inordinately low tax bills due to Prop. 13, the greater the tax break on the new property. And those who downsize would often be competing with first-time buyers for more-affordable smaller homes. The real reform would be to abolish the tax-transfer program, not expand it.”

• The Bakersfield Californian Editorial Board: “Proposition 19 is another do-over on the ballot. Two years ago, the real estate industry spent $13 million on a similar initiative campaign to expand the program statewide and enhance the benefit for eligible homeowners. Sixty percent of voters rejected the initiative.”

• Los Angeles Times Editorial Board: “But Proposition 19 would just expand the inequities in California’s property tax system. It would grossly benefit those who were lucky enough to buy a home years ago and hold onto it as values skyrocketed. It would give them a huge tax break and greater buying power in an already expensive real estate market. It would skew tax breaks further away from people who don’t own a home or who may be struggling to buy one.”

• San Francisco Chronicle Editorial Board: “[Proposition 19] is still a flawed package, designed to rev up home sales that benefit real estate agents who could reap more in commissions. It favors one narrow segment of the tax-paying public but does nothing for the rest of the state’s home buyers. The measure shows the convoluted extremes that California’s tangled property tax system produces.”

Whichever way you see it, it’s fairly clear that Proposition 19 is a billion-dollar tax increase on families. It limits one of the best tools parents have to help their children — the right, enshrined in California’s Constitution since 1986, to pass their home and other property on without any increase in property taxes, as a Proposition 19 parent to child transfer.

On the other hand, Proposition 19 still allows residents to avoid property tax reassessment, as long as families move into inherited property inside 12 months, and only as a primary residence. 

California beneficiaries inheriting property from parents can still work with trust lenders to get a loan to a trust you can also get a trust loan to buyout co-beneficiaries, while locking in a low property tax base… You can still easily buyout co-beneficiaries with a transfer of property between siblings.  Beneficiaries can always take advantage of a property tax transfer — in other words, transfer parents’  property taxes to themselves under Prop 19, what used to be Prop 58… and keep parents property taxes after inheriting property, and inheriting property taxes,  for as long as they live in their inherited home… as a standard Proposition 19 parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion from current property tax rates. 

Moreover, Prop 19 will in fact generate additional property tax revenue, that will supposedly be put to good use in the state of California. So, it cuts both ways.

Are Trusts Mainly for Wealthy Folks?

Are Trusts Only for the Wealthy

Are Trusts Only for the Wealthy?

Gifting property to adult children is a great thing to do, no matter the tax breaks – and thankfully, if you live in California and inherit property in that state, you do not need to be mega wealthy with $1,200 per hour tax lawyers to be able to avoid property tax reassessment, or to learn how to use a trust to save on taxes or to buy out siblings’ shares in your inherited real estate… with a trust loan.

Putting it bluntly, it doesn’t hurt to live in a state like California, where you get to save tens of thousands in tax breaks every year, compared to other states…. or compared to California the way it was pre-1978 before Proposition 13, and later in 1986 with Proposition 58, when you started to be able to keep parents property taxes when you’ve inherited property and are able to transfer parents property taxes, inheriting property taxes on a property tax transfer with a simple parent to child transfer or as lawyers call it, parent to child exclusion. Or perhaps lucky to be anywhere, if you can keep that house you inherited in your name, and you have a very good accountant! Another point – why trusts aren’t just for wealthy folks to save on income tax. 

There are trust lenders providing trust loans in California to cure family estate problems, with some beneficiaries insisting on selling inherited property – and no one can agree what the property value is, whether the local tax assessor is right or wrong;  or whether to sell or not to sell.  This is most likely one reason, besides saving on property taxes, that many property tax consultants and tax attorneys firmly believe that lawmakers in every state should pass property tax relief bills that make sense.

It would be advisable for homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting property to go to websites focused on CA Proposition 19, Prop 13, Prop 58, and Proposition 60… such as Michael Wyatt Consulting   and Trust and Estate Loans info-sites  or irrevocable trust lenders, or perhaps niche California focused property tax relief blogs like this one, Property Tax News.  Which is simply to straighten up and learn more about why property tax relief is crucial to California, and would be an economic life-saver to other states, if they were to surprise everyone and gain some genuine leadership, along the lines of what New York has.  So the middle class (not just the millionaires) can live in comfort and security.

As every state in America is now in the throes of a relentless pandemic, with a disastrous affect on businesses and unemployment within local and state economies…  lawmakers in every state would be wise to look at passing a property tax relief bill that would give consumers some financial relief, for example as CA Proposition 13 did in beginning in 1978 and Proposition 58 did in the beginning of that Amendment in 1986, giving Californians the ability to transfer parents property taxes.   

It seemed like a miracle for middle class homeowners in California… and beneficiaries to trusts inheriting a home from parents.  Enabling a property tax transfer solution from parents and grandparents when inheriting a home, and likewise inheriting property taxes – with a parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion… the urgent need to keep parents property taxes was all of a sudden a reality, thanks to Howard Jarvis and colleagues, regardless of their deeper motivations – and of course the ability to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property; avoiding property tax reassessment to keep property taxes low, and to have the ability to utilize trusts for a lower tax base – for all Americans; not just for corporate CEOs, VIPs and wealthy families in Beverly Hills, in Santa Barbara, the Marina in San Francisco, or similar locales. 

Transferring Your Mom’s Low Property Tax Base Via Prop 19

Transferring A Parents Low Property Tax Base with California Prop 19

Transferring A Parents Low Property Tax Base with California Proposition 19

It’s certainly nice and politically correct of the California Governor to let resident companies and families pay property taxes a few weeks late;   with millions of people unemployed or under-employed — with mouths to feed and bills to pay.  Politically correct, with nice optics… But not terribly effective, let’s face it.

How about just not collecting property taxes as long as the pandemic is literally killing our economy. How about something with a material, profound affect, not just nibbling weakly around the edges.  However, California still has more property tax relief options than any other state in the union, for middle class homeowners.  Wealthy residents  have countless tax cuts and property tax breaks.

At any rate, the country is moving rapidly towards a vaccine. Fine. But if the Governor of California and his team really want to move the needle for middle class residents, and genuinely help working families survive the disastrous pandemic economic effect — why don’t they update and bolster the benefits offered by Proposition 19, which is already in place?  No need to re-invent anything to move this to the next level! 

As the pandemic continues to diminish the California economy — the powerful realtor community and the State Legislature are promoting status quo — not really digging in and trying hard to  upgrade and improve the property tax breaks that are already in place.  They seem to have no appetite at all to make  the lives of millions of middle class homeowners more secure — with hope for better days in the future.  They seem instead to be far more interested in making the realtor community and the Legislature more secure, more comfortable, and a great deal wealthier regardless of the fact that these partisan groups are already swimming in money! 

However, despite the Legislature’s indifference to the financial problems of the middle class, Californians still have property tax relief options such as the right to keep parents property taxes, and transfer parents property taxes upon inheriting property and inheriting property taxes at a low base rate, as per Proposition 58 which is really now Proposition 19… Plus of course Prop 13 — but the walls may close in on us fast if we allow the powers that be to return with anything like the infamous commercial property tax Proposition 15; which would have increased prices across the state on virtually all goods and services… cutting deep into the middle class spending and tax paying machine that basically keeps the state economy alive. 

Many of these middle class residents stay up to date on  their property tax options, with websites such as the official California State Board of Equalization site.  As well as by researching inheritance solutions and property tax relief on property tax blogs like this one, Property Tax News;  plus going to websites addressing Prop 13 and maintaining a low property tax base… basic property tax breaks that allow resident to spend less and save more, like Trust and Estate Loans, and crucial updated information and news on Proposition 19 at the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.  

Residents  these days also look seriously at options  and solutions to property devalued by the affects of the pandemic… going to websites like Michael Wyatt Consulting for help.  In fact, Mr. Wyatt speaks to this on his website in a very direct way.  He says:

The Covid-19 / Coronavirus pandemic has severely impacted the commercial and investment real estate markets in California. This has placed a significant burden on many property owners. The good news is, property tax relief is now available.  One of the property tax relief measures available is for when “restricted access” to properties causes a loss of market value of those properties. The other is reductions in value due to damage, destruction, depreciation, obsolescence, removal of property, or “other factors causing a decline in value“.  An effective method of supporting lost value due to restricted access or damage to a property, is to measure the loss of  revenue  from periods before and after the event causing the decline of the property’s performance.

New homeowners in California also research property tax breaks at  established finance firms that are focused on options that involve Proposition 58, and now Proposition 19, maintaining a low property tax base through a loan to an irrevocable trust, such as critical financing options for California residents furnished by Commercial Loan Corp — again, working hand-in-hand with Proposition 58 having morphed into Proposition 19 for all intensive purposes.   For  all commercial and residential property owners; enabling beneficiaries and homeowners to lock in a secure, low Proposition 13 property tax base, while buying out co-beneficiaries that have inherited the same property, yet are committed to selling their property shares — and who ultimately walk away with far more money in their pocket from irrevocable trust funding, rather than simply accepting cash from a third party buyer!

Property tax options that involve going through a trust loan are important to tax attorneys and sophisticated beneficiaries, as these specific property tax options are always more profitable; as well as maintaining a low property tax base with a property tax transfer, basically for the life of the property, with a standard parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion from paying reassessed property taxes; as long as requirements for Proposition 58 — now Proposition 19 — have been met.

We so have effective options to turn to in California… So we shouldn’t complain too much even though new property tax relief changes have created some challenges.  We also have a lot to be thankful for.

If you are curious how much you might be able to save by taking advantage of California Proposition 19 or Proposition 58, fill out the short form located here for a free estimate.