New CA Property Tax Relief Transferring Low Property Tax Values

Transferring A Parents Property Tax Value In California

Transferring A Parents Property Tax Value In California

2022 Tax Relief: Inherited Properties & Replacement Homes

The 2021 CA constitutional amendment, Proposition 19, otherwise known as the “Home Protection for Seniors, Severely Disabled, Families and Victims of Wildfire or Natural Disasters Act”, expands a surprising number of tax breaks (with respect to “replacement residence” tax relief benefits) mainly for homeowners over age 55 or suffering from a severe disability… making it possible to transfer a low property tax base from an original home to a new residence, or “replacement home”.

Californians also able to take advantage of expanded property tax breaks are homeowners with a damaged or completely destroyed home, caused by a natural disaster such as a flood, earthquake, or wildfire, can now move to a replacement residence, up to three time – in any of California’s 58 counties, expanded from previous limits of only ten counties allowing the transfer of a low property tax base to a new residence. This is actually quite ironic, as senior and elderly Americans, and folks with disabilities, generally find themselves either ignored or on the short end of the stick, so to speak. So this represents a societal shift, for the better.

However, it is important to point out that Proposition 19 also imposes new limits on property tax benefits for inherited family property, limiting uses of the popular 1986 Proposition 58 “parent-to-child exclusion” from reassessed (i.e., increased) property taxes; limiting parent-to-child transfers of property by narrowing usage in various ways.

This necessitates primary or principal residence (as opposed to owning and renting out investment properties) for both parents and beneficiaries, along with some other, minor, limitations.  On the other hand, beneficiaries do have a full year to move into an inherited primary home, only requiring a minimum of one heir to move in.

Buying Out Siblings & Keeping a Low Property Tax Base

Moreover, beneficiaries still have the ability to keep their parents’ family home, with their parents’ low property tax base, while taking advantage of Prop 19’s parent-to-child exclusion;  always staying focused on inheriting property taxes from parents during a typical  property tax transfer. Avoiding property tax reassessment being a top priority at all times.  For many beneficiaries getting a loan to a trust is critical, generally to buyout problematic co-beneficiaries insisting on selling their inherited property shares.

This typically involves a 6-figure or 7-figure loan to an irrevocable trust from a trust & estate lender, for example like industry leader Commercial Loan Corp, working in conjunction with Proposition 19 – supplying beneficiaries who are selling their inherited property shares with more money than a conventional buyer is likely to offer.

Avoiding a realtor, bypassing their standard 6% commission, and side-stepping the usual legal fees and transaction charges, leaves a good deal more cash, from a trust loan, to equalize beneficiaries selling their share of inherited property.  Basically, a win-win transaction all the way around.

Property Tax Relief Forms

  1. BOE-19-B, Claim for Transfer of Base Year Value to Replacement Primary Residence for Persons at Least Age 55 Years[External PDF]
  2. BOE-19-C, Certification of Value by Assessor for Base Year Value Transfer[External PDF]
  3. BOE-19-D, Claim for Transfer of Base Year Value to Replacement Primary Residence for Severely Disabled Persons[External PDF]
  4. BOE-19-DC, Certificate of Disability[External PDF]
  5. BOE-19-V, Claim for Transfer of Base Year Value to Replacement Primary Residence for Victims of Wildfire or Other Natural Disaster[External PDF]
  6. BOE-60-NR, Notice of Rescission of Claim to Transfer Base Year Value to Replacement Dwelling Under Revenue and Taxation Code Section 69.5 (Propositions 60/90/110)[External PDF]
  7. BOE-502-A Preliminary Change in Ownership Report[External PDF]
  8. BOE-502-AH Change in Ownership Statement[External PDF]
  9. BOE-502-D Change in Ownership Statement Death of Real Property Owner[External PDF]

Base Year Value Transfers for Homeowners 55+ or Disabled

Proposition 60/90 and 110 allowed persons over 55 or severely and permanently disabled persons to transfer the taxable value of their existing home to their new replacement home, so long as the market value of the new home is equal to or less than the existing home’s value and located in one of ten tax relief portability approved counties in California.

That left 48 counties not participating with tax breaks allowing the transfer of a low property tax base from an original home to a new replacement residence. When dealing with damage from a natural disaster like the wildfires California has been contending with lately… Or simply because you’re over the age of 55,  or suffering from a serious physical disability.

Of course the good news is that Proposition 19 now allows eligible homeowners to transfer the taxable value of their existing home to their new replace, and wish to move to a replacement home, or to new residence – of any value, anywhere within the state, up to three times (rather than once, with limited county choices and limited assessed dollar values – as it used to be until 2021).

Age 55+ and Disability Tax Relief Forms

  1. Claim for Transfer of Base Year Value to Replacement Primary Residence for Persons at Least Age 55 Years: BOE 19-D[External PDF]
  2. Claim for Transfer of Base Year Value to Replacement Primary Residence for Severely Disabled Persons: BOE 19V[External PDF]
  3. Certificate of Disability: BOE 19DC[External PDF]

Disaster Relief

Proposition 50 stipulated that a base year value of a home or property that is legitimately destroyed, or damaged beyond the point of residing there, by a disaster or wildfire verified as legitimate by the Governor may be transferred to comparable property within the same county.

Proposition 171 stated that the transfer of the base year value of a principal residence to one of 10 counties that has adopted these tax breaks. However, Proposition 19 now permits homeowners to move to a “replacement home” of higher assessed value than a previous primary residence – and transfer the lower tax base with an adjustment for the value difference when a home is damaged or destroyed by a wildfire or some other natural disaster.

Proposition 19 is covered at California State Board of Equalization  
Natural Disaster and Replacement Residence Form



New Rules For Property Tax Transfers In California

Rules for California Property Tax Transfer

The new rules for California Property Tax Transfer in 2021

To Transfer Property Taxes: New Rules & Regulations 

When Proposition 19 was voted into law in Nov 2020, taking affect in Feb of 2021 – a learning curve was suddenly in effect for new homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting property from parents. It became essential, especially for middle class and upper middle class families, to quickly learn about changes to tax relief laws that would impact both existing trusts and inherited real estate.

For example, a “qualified personal residence trust” (QPRT), which is a trust that is established with the intent of allowing parents to continue to live in a house; and once that period of time has ended the balance of the interest is transferred to beneficiaries.

Put simply, a QPRT is a special kind of irrevocable trust that allows the person who created it to remove a primary residence from his, or her, estate so gift taxes can be reduced when transferring assets to a beneficiary.

Buying Out Sibling Property Shares While Keeping Your Inherited Home at a Low Proposition 13 Tax Base

As many Californians know, a loan to an irrevocable trust can also be used to buyout siblings’ property shares, inherited from a parent… while allowing beneficiaries who wish to retain that property, to transfer property taxes and keep that home at their parents’ low Proposition 13 protected tax base. It’s essentially a home equity loan on inherited property, made to the trust.

What a lot of people don’t know is the fact that the trustee and beneficiaries who are intent on keeping their inherited property will frequently borrow money to have their trust funded by a qualified trust lender licensed in the state of California so that an equal distribution of the trust can be made in order to meet California Proposition 19 Board of Equalization requirements.

Typically, beneficiaries enlist funding from a trust lender when a trust does not have sufficient cash to make an equal distribution to all the beneficiaries who are looking to sell their inherited property. Hence, the ability to transfer property taxes, mainly to transfer parents’ property taxes; and avoid property tax reassessment of an inherited home. Usually a savings of over $6,200 per year in property taxes. 

Avoiding ‘Fair Market Rates’ with Proposition 19 Trust Loan Exclusion from Property Reassessment

Changes to California property tax relief in 2021 are a challenge to  understand.  Trusts, Californians have discovered, are now used for more purposes than merely deferring property taxes for a few months. Californians have also discovered that they can avoid being reassessed at fair market rates by moving into inherited property as their principle residence  – bearing in mind a $1,000,000 cap on an exclusion from existing property tax rates.

The benefits of making a lifetime transfer of inherited property has to be compared to a transfer at the passing of a parent, which may cause you, as an heir, to inherit a “stepped-up basis” in transferred property. In other words, when you inherit assets that increased in value from when your deceased parent owned it, the asset’s “basis” is increased to the property’s current or “fair market” value on the date of the parent’s passing.  Unless you take steps to avoid this increase, to be able to transfer property taxes successfully, and avoid property tax reassessment altogether!

Saving Money on Property Taxes With Help From Experts!

When purchasing a new home or inheriting your parents’ residence
it makes sense to call a specialist experienced in the use of irrevocable trust loans to maintain your parent’s low property tax base. If you are inheriting a home, or expect to inherit a home and plan to transfer the low property tax base to a new home down the road, through an irrevocable trust loan in conjunction with Proposition 19, or Prop 58.

If you’re inheriting a home from a parent and wish to avoid property tax reassessment you still have all the tools to do so, as long as all new requirements are met.  If you’re a beneficiary, a brand new homeowners, you can  transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property and thus inheriting property taxes; with the ability  to keep parents low property tax base, as long as you live in your inherited home. 

When it comes to keeping a low property tax base, with Prop 58 [or now Prop 19] and a trust loan, I always bring my clients to Commercial Loan Corp.  Their loans to trusts give my clients several invaluable benefits. Their terms can be a lot more flexible than an institutional lender like Wells Fargo or Bank of America.  They’re self funded, and that’s why they can extend easier terms to clients…

When your parents die, and your trust agreement says ‘equal shares’  –  That means equal shares!  People basically just get the overall concept of getting money from a trust loan even if it doesn’t sell. It makes more sense all around to get a trust loan; and everyone gets more money.

Regarding the ever-present issue concerning families deciding to either sell inherited property; Or opting to keep property inherited from their parents – 

More heirs and beneficiaries end up not wanting to sell their inherited property. And  if they did want to sell, a lot of people can be easily convinced, with more cash from a trust loan and trust lender than an outside buyer would come up with, ‘equalizing’ things for them…

You have to look at it this way: there are always  one or two, minimum, who  insist on selling their shares in an inherited property. And there is our initial client contact, with those who want to sell.  And that is where these family estate or trust conflicts begin.  If they sell their property, capital gains tax always hits them. That’s where a trust loan comes in, to avoid that.

A trust lender like Commercial Loan Corp, that doesn’t charge any fees up-front, that’s another great benefit.  Plus, they don’t charge interest on their trust loan in advance. Not only that, there is never a “due-on-sale” clause… that requires the mortgage to be repaid in full when sold; or that all or some of the interest owed must be paid up-front to secure the mortgage. No “alienation clause”… in the event of a property transfer, stating the borrower has to pay back the mortgage in full before the borrower can transfer the property to anyone. 

Going with a firm like that – all costs are offset, unless you plan to keep a property for 2, 3 years or less. Then it doesn’t make sense. But generally you’re looking at keeping that property for seven or more years, as a rule...”

To learn more about your options when inheriting a home from parents – transferring a low property tax base to your new primary residence – contact Commercial Loan Corp, at (877) 756-4454 to speak with a Trust Loan or Property Tax Savings specialist. Chances are the end result will be a much lower property tax bill.

For more information on California Property Tax News, visit the PropertyTaxNews.org website for all of the latest information and updates. 

What CA Beneficiaries, Trustees & Homeowners Need to Know

New California Prop 19 Property Tax Transfer

New California Prop 19 Property Tax Transfer

Tax Basis Portability

As of Feb. 2021, so-called “tax basis portability” has been available to beneficiaries and homeowners, under the new Proposition 58 quasi-replacement, CA Proposition 19.  Tax basis portability is a way to reduce the assessed value of your home.  As a result, you have the generally significant benefit of lower property tax liability.

With “tax basis portability”, you can transfer the old assessed value of your previous home, to your next home. For instance, if you own  a house with an assessed value of, say, $400,000. You sell it for $600,000, and purchase a house for, let’s say, $550,000.  So rather than a new reassessed value of $550,000, you can apply to reverse  the value of the property back to the previous assessed value of $400,000. Therefore, the lower value can shave roughly $1,800 off your property taxes every year.  OK, it’s not a million dollars, but it adds up…

As long as you can verify that you are –

  1. age 55 or older;
  2. or severely disabled;
  3. or own a home that has been significantly damaged by forest-fire or wildfire, or a natural disaster, such as a flood.or severely disabled;
  4. plus, are inheriting a home that was a principle residence; and are moving into the property only as a principle residence.

“Portability” is language used to define estate tax law that enables a surviving spouse to use an estate tax exemption left by a deceased spouse to protect valuable assets during the surviving spouse’s life, or at the surviving spouse’s death.

Potential Issues with a Replacement Property

A “replacement property” can be purchased prior to the sale of home you are currently living in. Of course there may be some problems property tax relief critics, realtors, politicians, and the Legislature doesn’t like to acknowledge – such as the size of an inherited home, your family may be way too large for it.  Or the inherited home may be in an undesirable area. 

If you have children in school, the school in the new school district you may find yourself in might be completely  inferior to the previous school, upsetting your children. Or your commute to work may end up being an extra 4 hours on the freeway, getting to and from your new inherited home!

These issues can be exhausting and debilitating in the long run. Certainly something to consider.  In a perfect world, these issues would not surface and become a big problem when you inherit a home from a parent. However, it’s generally not a perfect world.

Improvements to Propositions 60, Prop 90 & 110

Revisiting several of the new property tax relief options… One can safely say, despite components that are perhaps not so helpful – that Proposition 19 is, in some ways, less restrictive than the old Proposition 60, Prop 90, and Prop 110.  There are no more county or sales price restrictions, and people can use the Proposition 19 property tax benefit more than once in a lifetime.

Proposition 19 Benefits

a) County restrictions are eliminated… The older rules limited the location of the properties in question. Proposition 60 restricted the tax basis portability within one county. Proposition 90 expanded that to a certain list of counties, so you could sell in one county and buy in another, but only if they were on that list.

b) Under Proposition 19… instead of limiting the counties of transfer, you can use this benefit anywhere in California.

c) No more sales price restrictions… Under Propositions 60 and 90, only transfers of “equal or lesser value” were eligible for tax basis portability.

d) A transfer of low tax basis… is now enabled by Proposition 19, regardless of value. However, certain adjustments to the tax basis are required if the purchase price of the replacement property is higher than the sale price of the previous home. 

New Proposition 19 Restrictions for Inherited Properties

On the other hand, under Proposition 19, beneficiaries could see a substantial increase in their property taxes for inherited property. While property tax relief in California had no exclusion or exemption limitations under Proposition 58, current property tax law exclusions under Proposition 19 apply strictly to the first $1,000,000 of inherited property value.

For instance, should your inherited property (i.e., primary residence) be assessed with a market value of $2,000,000 upon transfer to you as the official beneficiary, newly assessed value will be $1,000,000. In other words, $2,000,000 minus $1,000,000 (i.e., the first $1,000,000 of property value) – will equal a $1,000,000 limited exclusion.

Although you are most likely aware of other changes and limitations imposed on California property tax relief, it bears repeating.  As a beneficiary inheriting CA property taxes from a dad or mom, you now have to reside in a home only as a primary residence, if you are to take advantage of the Proposition 19 tax break, providing an exclusion from property tax reassessment at current market rates. You can no longer receive an exclusion from reassessment for an investment property.

Some say the underside to this reveals a change that mainly benefits the realtor community in California – using the Bridges family as their one and only singular example of inheriting CA property taxes from a wealthy parent, in this case a luxury beach- front property being used as a lucrative investment property; saving a great deal in taxes – while renting out to wealthy vacationers for $15,000 per month.

For whatever reason, critics of property tax relief have as yet produced very few specific examples of this type of inherited property used for “rental revenue” purposes, as opposed to “primary residential” purposes.  Incredibly, the property tax law removing Prop 13 and Prop 58 property tax breaks from investment properties is apparently based on this one oft-told, tired tale of the Bridges family!

As you probably also know – as an inheritor, you have only 12-months in order to establish your inherited property as a principal or primary residence, to avoid property tax reassessment. However, if your inherited property value is more than $1,000,000 over the original tax basis, you are most likely still facing property tax reassessment – and this can hit the pocketbook hard. This may encourage you to sell out, if that’s the case.

Help From Property Tax Specialists

If you don’t want to sell your inherited home, you may be inclined  to enlist the help of a property tax consultants for example (great proponents of property tax breaks, and supporters of Propositions 13 and 58); or a trust lender like Commercial Loan Corp, with a loan to an irrevocable trust – and buyout your siblings, if you have siblings, who prefer to sell their property shares from the same inherited property you have received from your parents. 

You can establish a permanent, low Proposition 13 tax base this way, and take over 100% of the inherited property equity, with the trust loan paying off anything owed on the inherited home.   Plus, your siblings will end up with a good deal more cash from the trust loan than if they had sold out to an outside buyer.

Proposition 19 Changes  to the CA Parent-Child Exclusion

Let’s say a parent owns a home that is his or her primary residence plus a rental property (such as an apartment building or commercial building) in California. The home has an assessed value of $500,000 and a fair market value of $3,000,000. The rental property also has an assessed value of $500,000 and a fair market value of $2,000,000. Even though these properties have different current market values, their property tax liability is similar because they have the same assessed value. The combined annual property tax of both properties with a property tax rate of 1.25% is $12,500.

Prior to Proposition 19:  Let’s say the parent in this example wanted to transfer both properties to his son. There was no reassessment on the transfer of either the home or the rental property from father to son. The home before Proposition 19, under Proposition 58, could be transferred to the son irrespective of its’ value, since it was the father’s primary residence, and the assessed value of the rental property falls below the $1,000,000 threshold.

Therefore the combined annual property tax stays at $12,500. Moreover, there were no restrictions on the son’s usage of either property – therefore the son might have used both properties as investment properties if that is what he wished to do. 

Outcomes Under Proposition 19: Let’s say new assessed value of a house is $2,000,000 since the current market value is larger than the assessed value by more than $1,000,000 (i.e., the new assessed value has a current market value of $3,000,000 minus $1,000,000). The new assessed value for the rental property is its fair market value of $2,000,000 because no exclusion or exemption from reassessment at current market rates applies to transfers of property from parent-to-child other than a primary residence.

Yet if it is indeed a principle residence that beneficiary or heirs  are moving into, in keeping with the 12-month inherited property move-in deadline – all the bells and whistles really are still there to be taken advantage of – such as inheriting CA property taxes from parents,    having the right to continue transferring property taxes while avoiding property tax reassessment, while being able to use a Proposition 19 loan to an irrevocable trust to keep a parents low property tax base as well as buying out siblings’ inherited property shares – formerly a Proposition 58 transfer of property between siblings…

By the same token, heirs or beneficiaries of inherited property can make full use of any property tax transfer as long as these new restrictive requirements are met…  an inheritor can transfer parents property taxes and likewise keep parents property taxes thereafter upon inheriting CA property taxes from ones’ father or mother – and complete the process with a parent-to-child transfer and parent-child exclusion.  Californians are still able to successfully avoid property tax reassessment by inheriting CA property taxes from parents, in the final analysis, keeping a low property tax base when inheriting a home. The key to property tax relief in all 58 counties in California.  

The new combined annual property tax will be $50,000. In addition, the son has to use the inherited family house as his primary residence or that property is sure to be reassessed at the current market value of $3,000,000, which will increase the combined annual property tax for both properties to $62,500.

You see the difference? This accounts for the growing push-back on Proposition 19…despite all the positive elements that come with this property tax measure.

Working With An Irrevocable Trust Lender

Irrevocable Trust Lenders

Irrevocable Trust Lenders

First, let’s go back over the key elements involved in the most popular trust loan beneficiary-conflict solution available in California.  It’s worth mentioning that California is still the only state in America where you can avoid property tax reassessment at current rates; capped at 2% taxation basically as long as you own property inherited from parents… thanks to 1978 CA Proposition 13. 

And this is where we get into trust liquidity – something a lot of folks in California don’t really understand. California business property and residential property owners, in addition to having the right to keep parents property taxes, and transfer parents property taxes upon inheriting property, and then inheriting property taxes at the low Proposition 13 two-percent tax rate maximum – can maintain a low property tax transfer rate basically forever, through a parent to child transfer, or “parent to child exclusion”, as long as all tax relief requirements have been met, usually with the assistance of an experienced irrevocable trust lender.  

Additionally, Californians even have the right to apply for the same tax break on a secondary property inherited from parents.  Approval is a formality only. No only that, as a California property owner you can buyout as many siblings as you like; that is to say, as many co-beneficiaries as there are who wish to sell their inherited property shares – as long as you are approved for the appropriate amount of funding to a trust loan, from your trust lender… And as long as the co-beneficiaries are fully committed to selling out through a trust loan, rather than accepting less money from a third-party outside buyer – while you keep the same inherited property from your parents, financed through the trust loan, avoiding property tax reassessment for that point on, establishing and maintaining a low Proposition 13 property tax base.

Elements that drive this process are worth researching, to understand the subject better and simply to be able to work more effectively with a trust lender… Many of these process elements are covered in detail on the California State Board of Equalization website, focusing on various relevant components within Proposition 58 among others.  Or you can research heavily detailed business sites such as Commercial Loan Corp, the brainchild of forward-thinking CEO Kerry Smith;  or info-blogs such as Medium.com,  or perhaps  the Trust and Estate Loans micro-site; or the Property Tax News blog…  Trust loans working in accord with Proposition 19 make it possible for heirs and beneficiaries to sell their shares of inherited property, a co-beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares – as realtors put it, “the transfer of property between siblings”, and “lending money to an irrevocable trust“ – typically from an irrevocable trust loan lender.

Commercial Loan Corporation in Newport Beach, CA appears to be the “favorite flavor” of the decade, where trust lenders are concerned, as they specialize in taking full advantage of all Proposition 19 property tax relief benefits for clients; helping beneficiary siblings avoid property tax reassessment, while making sure they transfer parents property taxes correctly, when inheriting property taxes from parents, a business facility, home and/or land; abruptly inheriting property taxes that have to remain low, simply to free up some needed cash; in order to keep up a reasonable lifestyle, what with the cost of living in California these days.  

You also want to be careful, to work with a trust lender that has a great deal of experience with this process… To make sure that beneficiaries and  property owners take full advantage of the right to keep parents property taxes, with a low Proposition 13 tax base.  No other state in America even comes close to providing this sort of property tax relief. And property taxes in this country, for the most part, are high for a middle class and working class families. No other state gives residents the ability to use a CA Proposition 58 or California Prop 13 type of property tax transfer, with parent to child transfer, or as lawyers like to call it, “parent to child exclusion”.

The fact is, we need to know how to work with a professional trust lender to be able to use tax breaks as efficiently as possible, that as Californians we are fortunate enough to have access to.  Moreover, every property owner in every state should know how to work with an irrevocable trust lender to buy out a beneficiary’s share of inherited property; and basically understand how a sibling-to-sibling property transfer or co-beneficiary buyout of sibling property works in California.

Bottom line, every state in this country should have trust lenders to work with  to take advantage of residential and commercial property tax relief solutions similar to Californian property tax breaks such as CA Proposition 13, and now Proposition 19 – enabling property owners to keep parents property taxes, at a low 2% capped tax base from Prop 13… along with property tax transfer benefits still in effect from CA Proposition 58; enabling the transfer of property between siblings, or, more specifically, allowing a co-beneficiary buyout of sibling property, paying them cash to not sell out, while you get to keep your parent’s house and/or land at that super low Proposition 13 protected tax base.

If you are in need of a loan to an irrevocable trust, please completed this form and we will have a representative from Commercial Loan Corporation contact you; or you may call them at 877-464-1066: