Is There Support in California to Reverse Potential Property Tax Hikes?

Are Trusts Only for the Wealthy

Are Trusts Only for the Wealthy

California Assembly Constitutional Amendment 9  

As most Californians know by now, CA Assemblyman Kevin Kiley introduced property tax measure ACA 9 to try to return long term property tax relief benefits to their original state.

Specifically, Assembly Constitutional Amendment 9 focuses on strengthening and bolstering parental property tax transfer in California, meaning the parent-child transfer and popular parent-to-child exclusion – which still gives Californians the ability to transfer parents property taxes and  keep parents property taxes when gifting or inheriting parents property.  As well as buying out co-beneficiaries’ property through Proposition 19, formerly Prop 58, in conjunction with a loan to an irrevocable trust; establishing a low property tax base upon inheriting a home… and always bearing in mind California’s long running right to avoid property tax reassessment. 

All California property tax relief rights were, and still are, hand-in-hand with the overall ability to transfer property, parental property tax transfer mainly, during inheritance from parent to child, and a tax break that is still protected by property tax measure Proposition 19 – mainly affecting middle class beneficiaries inheriting property, and mid-income homeowners residing in all 58 counties in California, and yet not fully understood by many residents.

California Proposition 19

Proposition 19 passed on Nov 3rd by a slight majority, following a very effective $40 million promotional campaign mostly paid for by the California Association of Realtors (the C.A.R.);  highlighting property tax breaks that favored residents over the age of 55, as well as sentimental favorites, such as school children and firefighters.  The campaign rivaled anything Madison Avenue could have come  up with!

Soon after Feb 2021, Californians and local media began to discuss Proposition 19 in terms that characterized Proposition 19 parental property tax transfer rights — enabling families to transfer property taxes to and from anywhere in the state — as basically replacing   Proposition 58 property tax breaks, a long-standing property tax measure that was voted into law in 1986 with a 75% voter majority; after a unanimous vote in the Legislature placed it on the ballot. Proposition 58 amended the state constitution to permit parents to transfer a home of any value and up to a $1 million of other property — such as a vacation cabin, rental property or small business – avoiding property reassessment.

Protecting Property Tax Relief & the CA American Dream

“The opportunity to own a home is central to the California Dream, but our state’s affordability crisis has put this beyond the reach of too many working families,” Kiley said. “Now, thanks to a Special Interest deal, Californians face a large and unplanned-for tax increase when they pass down property to their children. ACA 9 restores a vital protection that was in place for 35 years.”

As certain residents and activists try to change certain confusing revisions to property tax relief in California, they also acknowledge positive property tax breaks, such as benefits for property owners over 55 years old, who are eligible for tax assessment transfers; people with severe disabilities, victims of wildfires and other natural disasters; as well as sentimental favorites such as fire-fighters and school children. And who is going to deny eligible homeowners like that.

Positive property tax relief measures allow eligible homeowners to transfer their tax assessments anywhere within the state and allow tax assessments to be transferred to a more expensive home with an upward adjustment. The number of times that a tax assessment can be transferred increased from one to three for persons over 55 years old or with severe disabilities (disaster and contamination victims would continue to be allowed one transfer).

California Assembly Constitutional Amendment 9 focuses on parents and grandparents transferring primary residential properties to their children or grandchildren while avoiding property tax reassessment. ACA 9 also addresses issues revolving around parents and grandparents transferring vacation homes and business properties to their children and  grandchildren; with the first $1 million exempt from re-assessment when transferred.

Limitations on One Hand & Huge Benefits on the Other

Now, it’s true that there are some limitations in certain circumstances. People who want to take advantage of the parent-to-child exclusion and grandparent-grandchild exemption must move into their inherited property as a primary residence, which many residents want to do anyway, and they do have an entire year to move in. 

On the other hand, senior rights being a central issue  for middle class and upper middle class families in California, residents over the age of 55 have a whole suite of new property tax benefits, along with folks with disabilities, and victims of natural disasters such as  earthquakes and floods, as well as forest fires (which are extremely timely these days in California, especially for middle class residents).

When inherited property is used as a primary residence but is sold for $1 million more than the property’s taxable value, an upward adjustment in assessed value would occur. The ballot measure also applied these rules to certain farms. Beginning Feb. 16, 2023, the first $1 million is adjusted each year at a rate equal to the change in the California House Price Index.

Jon Coupal, president of HJTA, weighed in on the new activities designed to reverse any questionable changes to California property tax relief. Mr. Coupal stated: “The Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association is proud to support ACA 9 to reinstate Propositions 58 and 193, reversing any stealth tax increases on California families!”

No one could have put it any clearer.

Prop 58 Parent-Child Exclusion Has Morphed Into Prop 19 Property Tax Breaks

Prop 19 Property Tax Breaks

Prop 19 Property Tax Breaks

The Proposition 58 parent-child exclusion and other tax  breaks have now  changed into the Proposition 19 Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer

As most Californians are aware, a home undergoes reassessment at “market value” if it’s transferred, inherited, sold or gifted – and, in turn, taxes on the property often increase significantly. Yet, if the sale or gift or transfer is between parent and offspring, in certain situations, the home won’t undergo reassessment once specific requirements are met and the relevant application is filed properly.

California’s unique Proposition 58 tax break enables new homeowners or beneficiaries to avoid property tax reassessment when inheriting real estate and liquid assets; upon receiving a home or other real estate from a parent – or vice versa. When a home, for example, is sold, given as a gift, transferred as an inheritance, or transferred through a trust.  However, the fact remains – inheriting property taxes from Dad or Mom is now more limited than it was before.

As we know, a new homeowner’s property taxes are calculated through the time honored, low Proposition 13 base year value, typically what parents had paid… as opposed to so-called “fair market value” or “current market value” when new property is acquired – gifted, bought, generally inherited… As most homeowners know by now, real estate transfers excluded from property tax reassessment by Proposition 58 or Prop 193 have to be used as a principal residence (with no value limit). 

For those of you who are extra detail oriented – Proposition 58 is established in section 63.1 of the Revenue and Taxation Code.  It’s also worth mentioning that, with respect to  Proposition 193,  parents of a grandchild do have to be deceased prior to property transfer from grandparent to grandchild.  Alternatively, the grandparent’s child can be deceased, with the surviving parent-in-law being remarried prior to the transfer event.

The below bullet points may untangle some of the confusion that has formed around some of these property  tax breaks.  We need to take note that property tax relief limitations built into Proposition 19 are presently serving as a replacement to the pre-Feb 2021 Proposition 58  parent-to-child exclusion, also referred to as a “parent-child exemption” (from property tax reassessment).

Some of the new Proposition 19 tax breaks are a work in progress,  however most have been given a stamp of approval by the BOE

• Proposition 19 was more or less rushed through the political and electoral process, passed by the CA Legislature in under a week, and placed onto the Nov 2020 ballot, changing the California state constitution without implementing the appropriate statutes. Homeowners’ ability to transfer parents property taxes, in other words the right to keep parents property taxes on any parental property tax transfer, inheriting property taxes from Dad or Mom… and enabling heirs to keep parents property taxes are sill in place as valid tax breaks, allowing beneficiaries or heirs to avoid property tax reassessment – the process is just more limited than it was previously. 

Moreover, establishing a low property tax base along with the transfer of property between siblings, sibling-to-sibling property transfer – buying out a sibling’s share of inherited property through a trust loan, in conjunction with Prop 58, is still firmly in place, however inheriting property taxes from Dad or Mom is now limited somewhat by Proposition 19. Similar limitations are now in place as well concerning the process of inheriting property taxes from a parent, the parent to child transfer and exclusion for reassessment of property taxes, or parent-child exclusion (from property tax reassessment at current market rates).

• Sections of the approved documentation and revisions to various sections are vague at best and often unclear

• To correct these issues, Santa Clara County Tax Assessor Larry Stone was appointed by the California Assessors’ Association (CAA), with four other tax Assessors, to a hastily formed CAA “committee” to try to provide some clarity to the new Proposition 19 implementation process.

• The CAA “committee” has enlisted supposed specialists and tax lawyers throughout California, and is working with the Board of Equalization (BOE) to furnish guidance and where necessary recommend passage, on an urgency basis, towards implementing appropriate statutes.

• Homeowners over the age of 55 (or “who meet other qualifications” which remains vague) would be eligible for property tax savings when they move. To avoid property tax reassessment at current or “fair market” rates, beneficiaries inheriting property from parents must move within 12-months into an inherited home, using this property only as a primary or principle residence.

• Likewise, the parent leaving the home to beneficiaries must have been residing in that home as a principle or primary residence. Apparently, going forward into 2021 and beyond, there will be no exceptions to these new rules and regulations.

• Only inherited properties used as primary homes or farms would be eligible for property tax savings. Those who are “severely disabled”, or whose homes were destroyed by wildfire or a “natural disaster” can now transfer their primary residence’s property tax base value to a replacement residence of any value, anywhere in the state.  This was considerably more limited prior to Feb 2021.

• Eligible homeowners can now take advantage of “special rules” to move to a more expensive home. Their property tax bill would still go up but not by as much as it would be for home buyers that are “not eligible”.

• Eligible homeowners may use these “special rules” three times in a lifetime. (for declared disaster victims, there is no limit on the number of times these benefits can be used.)

Filing Requirements

A claim form must now, as of Feb 2021, be completed and signed by the transferors and transferee and filed with the Assessor. A claim has to be filed  within three years after the date of purchase or transfer, or prior to the transfer of the real estate to a third party, whichever is earlier.

If a claim form has not been filed by the date specified above it will be timely if filed within six months after the date of mailing of the notice of supplemental or escape assessment for this property. If a claim is not timely filed the exclusion will be granted beginning with the calendar year in which you file your claim.

Beneficiary Property Disputes Resolved by Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts

Over the past several years, since 2016, we have seen a fair amount of estates, or inheritances in trust, that are embroiled in a dispute or infra-family trust battle over who should be receiving the larger share of cash assets or the largest percentage of an old home left a Mom or a Dad. And we see this pattern repeated over and over again; the same words, the same playbook, similar arguments and similar claims.

Several US firms that provide inheritance loans and cash advance assignments for estate heirs and trust beneficiaries receiving inheritance assets and property have all confirmed, when asked, that up to 75% of the families they have provided advance funds to were mired in infra-family squabbles and disputes over inheritance funds or inherited real estate. 

In California a simple trust loan solution involving Proposition 58, as well as specific tax breaks within Proposition 13, resolve certain beneficiary property disputes.  Only in California is it possible for family members to buyout a co-beneficiary, usually a sibling or several siblings, with the help of established property tax breaks…

Therefore, family disputes caused by sibling disagreements over whether or not they should sell or retain shared inherited property; or what that inherited property value should be, if the assigned tax assessor value is mistrusted, can easily be minimized… Generally, these conflicts are resolved rapidly and satisfactorily if a large loan to an irrevocable trust (working in tandem with CA Proposition 58) is implemented effectively through an experienced trust lender.

If this trust loan process is not implemented properly, the wheels trend to come off the estate wagon, so to speak, and these particular estates typically do not end well.  Whereas, if this trust loan & Prop 58 process is executed correctly beneficiaries end up owning their  inherited property securely, while siblings who insist on selling their inherited property shares end up receiving more money through the trust loan process than if they had received a direct non-trust cash payment from an outside buyer.

Residential and commercial property owners in every single state in America need to research benefits provided by trust lenders furnishing loans to trusts, specifically loans to irrevocable trusts and CA Proposition 13 transfer of property establishing a fixed low base rate in conjunction with a Proposition 58 transfer of parents’ property and transfer of parents property taxes. 

All property owners, for their own good, will eventually have to understand what inheriting parents property, inheriting property taxes, property tax transfer and what the ability to  transfer parents property taxes is really all about.  Plus how to keep parents property taxes at the lowest base rate possible.  Moreover, they must understand why a parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion, is so profoundly important and creates the core of property tax relief in California… And we can only hope in other states as well.  If homeowners in other states begin calling and sending emails to their often invisible representatives in Washington DC, this might actually become a reality in the near future – and should, given the economic challenges middle class families are facing, and will continue to face for some time to come.

Goods and services as well as real estate can be incredibly pricey in states like Connecticut, Texas, California, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts… these are all expensive states, in terms of day to day living… However, decreasing property taxes down to a more manageable level can change people’s entire outlook on their life, helping middle class families to function more effectively with financial struggles, at least to some degree.

Moreover, the concept of paying yearly taxes on something you purchase and then keep for many years, might be flawed to begin with. What other large purchase you may make continues to charge you fees for ownership, for the rest of the time that you own that item?  Other than insurance, do you continue to pay taxes on a boat you own? An airplane? A car? A motorcycle? None. Only real property.  Perhaps the whole concept of taxing real estate after the initial purchase could use some fresh, new examination.

At any rate, California is still the only state in America where you can avoid property tax reassessment at current market rates; capped at 2% taxation,  as long as you own property inherited from parents… thanks to 1978 CA Proposition 13 enabling the ability to  transfer parents property taxes.  These issues are covered in detail on the California State Board of Equalization, that covers Proposition 58 at great length.  Or you can look at business oriented sites that focus on property tax relief,  such as Michael Wyatt Consulting, or trust loans and Proposition 58 at sites like Commercial Loan Corp;  or go take a look at resource info blogs such as Loan to a Trust, or even a blog like this one,  Property Tax News for information on Proposition 19, Proposition 13, and support or opposition to property tax relief in California, in the present as well as in years past for an accurate historical perspective.

Does the 1978 Proposition 13 & 1986 Prop 58 still Work for Californians?

Does the 1978 Proposition 13 and 1986 Prop 58 still Work for Californians

Does the 1978 Proposition 13 and 1986 Prop 58 still Work for Californians

History Lesson on Property Tax Relief: Support & Opposition

2020 was an extremely motivated time for pent up anti property tax relief movement in California.  The deceptively entitled “2020 Proposition 13” went to voters on March 3, 2020. This tax hike would have increased California’s overall debt; compelling the state’s school districts to issue more debt, raising property tax bills all across the state. It did not pass, and to put it bluntly, was an utter waste of time and taxpayer’s money.

Unlike Proposition 13 passed by voters in 1978, this 2020 version of Proposition 13 would have doubled the debt caps that currently limit how much bond debt local school districts can acquire. The 2020 Proposition 13 caps on local bond debt would have been increased from 1.25% of assessed property value to 2% for elementary and high school districts, and from 2.5% to 4% for school and community college districts.

The extra property tax revenue from 2020 Prop 13 would have gone into pockets not into roads.  The  2020 Proposition 13 tax hike would have cost taxpayers $740 million per year for 35 years. The cash mainly going to construction-worker unions and contractors that hire everyone, with priority spending going to people working on projects in districts that have signed labor agreements that those in  power prefer.  As we know, the so-called 2020 Proposition 13 failed.

Prop 15 and the Near End of Commercial Property Tax Relief     

Even more dangerous for California, the 2020 Proposition 15 tax hike that was proposed to voters across all 58 counties would have removed the right for commercial property owners to avoid property tax reassessment.  This would have raised property taxes on all commercial and business property owners, which would have raised commercial store rents, office and apt. rentals, rentals on all business tenants would have gone up.  This would in turn have increased prices on all goods and services throughout the state of California.   Considering the outcome on middle class residents and working families, it would not have been a pretty picture.

Supporters of the Proposition 15 campaign raised over $67.6 million mostly from foundations and public service unions. The top three contributors were the Chan Zuckerburg Initiative, California Teachers Association, and SEIU California. Supporters say Prop 15 is a broad coalition of 1600 organizations launched by civil rights organizations, housing groups, parents, teachers, nurses, firefighters and community-based organizations who advocate for equality and justice for communities of color

Opposition to Proposition 15 Campaign has raised over $73.1 million mostly from land developers, agricultural interests and golf and country clubs. The largest donor is the California Business Roundtable Issues PAC that has contributed more than $38 million to the No on 15 Campaign.  The Business Roundtable’s biggest donors are New York-based Blackstone Property Partners who gave $7 million and Michael Hayde, CEO of the Irvine real estate investment firm Western National Group, who gave $4.5 million.

Despite the massive effort towards promoting and passing this tax hike, voters were not sufficiently confused or conned into backing the bill en mass… and they rejected this tax increase on commercial properties, supposedly depriving the California school system of what allegedly could be a significant source of consistent revenue.  Although the true intended recipients of this extra commercial property tax revenue remained under questions… and backers of Proposition 15 – the first major effort to cut into beloved property tax relief afforded by Proposition 13 since it was voted into law in 1978 – finally conceded defeat, and California heaved a statewide sigh of unified relief. 

The question remains – would economic collapse of the statewide   consumer base and working family structure in California have been worth a few extra dollars for the educational system, which is doing relatively well as is?

Last Minute Promotion of Snake Oil Sales to California Voters

Motivated, determined and relentless opponents to property tax relief in California came up with a last minute tax hike measure, Proposition 19 – and the CA Association of Realtors shoved $35 Million at the CA Legislature to promote this unusually deceptive bill, after suffering significant tax hike losses.  They managed to confuse enough voters with disingenuous and deceptive public relations to get Proposition 19 passed – by a hair – and watered down the critical Proposition 58 “parent-to-child exclusion” tax break for middle class beneficiaries and new homeowners. 

This weakened California homeowners’ ability to avoid property tax reassessment without obstacles. So Proposition 19 managed to limit parent to child transfer rights to a one-year window, and only as a primary residence.  No longer could investment properties avoid property tax reassessment.

So the ability to transfer parents property taxes, when inheriting property taxes from a parent, is now on a tighter path. We can still keep parents property taxes but they made it more challenging, in the midst of a Pandemic no less.  Avoiding property tax reassessment and establishing a low property tax base; as well as buying out a sibling’s share of inherited property, meaning the transfer of property between siblings or sibling-to-sibling property transfer – still exists, yet with a few more obstacles to remain aware of. 

We can still transfer parents property taxes in California when  inheriting property and inheriting property taxes from a parent, and remain able to keep parents property taxes on any property tax transfer, such as the parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion.  It’s just not quite as simple or easy as it was prior to advent of Proposition 19.

Thankfully, enough property tax breaks survived in California to enable property owners to still save significantly on property taxes. Californians can still get a trust loan from a trust lender, working alongside Proposition 58, to buyout a co-beneficiary when inheriting property taxes from a parent – and, most importantly, to establish a low Proposition 13 level property tax base, basically forever for an inherited home, for example from a niche firm like Commercial Loan Corp.  

Most Californians struggling financially from Pandemic shutdowns and health outcomes should research niche blogs like this one, or   info sites like EdSource.org who looks  at both sides of Proposition 15 for example, or SiliconValleyandBeyond.com who examines property taxes and Proposition 19, among other related issues. As well as state government websites such as the  California State Board of Equalization.  The more we know about how to use trust loans and these unique tax breaks, plus other property tax reduction solutions we have access to, the better off we’ll all be going forward.

PART THREE: The CA Proposition 15 Split-Roll “Trojan Horse” Commercial Property Tax is Coming Up for a Vote!

California Proposition 15 2020

California Proposition 15 2020

Let’s project ahead for a moment…  In terms of the state you may live in, of the best way to avoid inherited property being a money pit (in terms of property taxes and upkeep), of it being a home you cannot afford to keep… So let’s keep it simple.  If every state in the union adopted the same sort of property tax relief that California has, with the right to keep parents property taxes, where you can avoid property tax reassessment, as with California’s 1978 Proposition 13, and Proposition 58 voted into law in 1986; we’d all be in good shape.

In a perfect world this wouldn’t be all that difficult to attain, if every state would wake up and smell the coffee, and instate property tax breaks like California has.  Frankly, if we all had representatives in  the Congress and Senate who actually cared about their job and cared about doing their job for us – this could easily be accomplished, if the will was there. 

Why shouldn’t every state offer property tax relief like California? It’s like dental care.  Why doesn’t every healthcare plan have genuine dental care?  Not $1500 owrth and then you’re on your own, but real dental.  Can with property tax relief.  Why shouldn’t every property owner in every state have property tax relief to make their life easier… While billionaires and multi-millionaires enjoy outrageous tax breaks every year.

Every  beneficiary or heir inheriting property from parents, or simply  residents or landlords or business folks owning property, would be able to afford to keep their commercial property, or an inherited home from parents.   As in California, this affects all types of property transfers… Giving every beneficiary the ability to keep parents property taxes, or benefiting from property tax transfer, inheriting property taxes – from parents’ low tax base of 2% thanks to Prop 13… This is the property tax base that helps property owners so profoundly in California.  Why not in every state?  

Without property tax breaks, as California has had since 1978, so many heirs to so many estates, or beneficiaries of so many trusts… in so many different states, inheriting property from parents, simply can’t afford the upkeep and property taxes on an  inherited home, and frequently are forced to sell their parents’ property. Often against their will.

We can simply call it “property tax relief”, the right to keep parents property taxes, similar to what you can accomplish in California; with Proposition 13, or during property tax transfer, utilizing CA Proposition 58 – keeping property taxes much lower, avoiding property tax reassessment. Beneficiaries who are inheriting property in any of the 58 counties in California, always have a low tax base not to exceed 2% from California Proposition 13, giving beneficiaries huge tax benefits from property inherited from a parent.

Plus there is always the ability to make good use of a loan to an irrevocable trust – as trust loans from trust lenders are used in conjunction with Proposition 58 to equalize cash to beneficiaries looking to sell an inherited property held up by beneficiaries of the same trust looking to keep the same inherited home and/or land… for once making scenarios like that a win-win experience for everyone in an estate or trust situation with a trust loan from a reliable trust lender. Instead of experiencing, repeatedly, problematic family conflicts revolving around property issues like this.

Just like in California, every state in America should be able to take advantage of the right to keep parents property taxes, to transfer parents property taxes, when inheriting property taxes. If, by any chance you reside in California, and you happen to be a beneficiary inheriting property from your parents, or an older person simply maintaining property you have owned for years, consider yourself very lucky.

This is why so many real estate lawyers in various locations these days strongly believe every state should have a property tax measure similar to California Proposition 13 and Proposition 58.  Beneficiaries everywhere agree wholeheartedly.

However, one gets the sense that every property owner may not be fully aware of all these tax benefits in California. The CA Proposition 13 tax shelter benefits during and after property tax transfer (with CA Proposition 58) saves beneficiaries big bucks, being able to transfer parents property taxes, being able to keep parents property taxes… inheriting property taxes that are capped.  We should never forget that   in California it’s just as many middle class people as wealthy folks who are able to avoid property tax reassessment at present day evaluation, through Proposition 13 benefits… And that saves you major money every year off property taxes… typically in the neighborhood of $6,200+ per year in fact.  Not a million dollars, but then again not nothing either!  

PART ONE: Trusts, Intra-Family Loans & Property Tax Benefits in California

California Proposition 58

California Proposition 58

Many beneficiaries in California who are inheriting property, and seriously considering trust loans with Proposition 58 to nail down a low California Proposition 13 property tax base… working in conjunction with Prop 58 (property transfer from parents) or Proposition 193 (property transfer from grand parents)  insures an iron clad property transfer tax shelter. Naturally, this provides a solution to a conflict that many estate heirs and trust beneficiaries often run into… with respect to buying out sibling beneficiary property shares, while locking in a low property tax base rate forever.  

This may not sound like much to some folks, but in fact it frequently makes the difference between being able to keep an inherited property, or losing it to the tax man or in a foreclosure due to yearly property taxes that aren’t able to avoid property tax reassessment, and consequently are much too high for a typical middle class property owner to maintain.

Trust loans are used by numerous beneficiaries of trusts, and probate estate heirs, who wish to buyout a co-beneficiary’s interest in a trust-owned home, business property, or land, where certain beneficiary siblings have decided to retain their inherited real property – while other siblings firmly stand their ground, preferring to sell their shares in an inherited property to an outside party.  A trust loan often provides a worthwhile solution to this type of family conflict, so one beneficiary, or several, can buyout other beneficiaries that are looking to sell.  

What is so interesting and unique about this type of estate or trust financing is the fact that the entire process is so different than the usual inheritance funding process, involving trust advances and probate loans. Best to side-step the “wealthy families only” firms, and to run with a trust lender that has a reputation for treating all clients as VIP customers, welcomed into a family-like atmosphere, regardless of the size of their loan.  Like the cloanc.com outfit in Newport Beach.  Naturally, a company like that is quick to secure a loan against real estate owned by the trust, which is a logical first-step, and tends to set clients’ minds at rest, letting everyone know that the process is proceeding forward in a common-sense, professional manner.  

This is completely different than the usual inheritance funding process, which uses the entire estate, real property plus cash and investment estate or trust assets, to supply heirs with an inheritance cash  advance “assignment”, rather than an actual “loan”.  Trust loans that work in conjunction with Proposition 58 serve a very different purpose, and a trustee must approve the trust loan of course, and sign off on the deal.

Beneficiaries and property owners should typically do their own solid  research on this process; on business oriented websites that are easy to understand,  such as Proposition 58 and Prop 13 focused site that offers a professional atmosphere, and provides clear, easy to digest information in an accurate, no-nonsense way… or a free resource site that covers a wide range of property tax relief issues; or even in articles on sites that can be trusted for accuracy, for example at Barrons, in an article like:  “How Family Loans and Trusts Can Create Big Wins”…  Focusing on: “…interest rates at historic lows — for the time being — wealthy families are turbocharging their estate-planning strategies by pairing intra-family loans with trusts… As long as interest rates stay low, many families with taxable estates can similarly benefit from cleverly structured trusts and intra-family loans…”  

A different use of trust loans, as we can see —  yet still a step away from conventional loans; bringing a trust and loan funding into the family mix… With trust loans and Proposition 58 moving the process into an entirely new arena, without the necessity of the involved  family being wealthy, should you be a well-off or middle class property owner or a new  beneficiary in the state of California.