FAQ: Property Tax Transfers & Taxes on Inherited Homes

Trust Loan Question and Answers

Trust Loan Question and Answers

California Proposition 19 Trust Loan Questions and Answers

If you are staying abreast of updates and news, concerning property tax relief in California, you are most likely aware that there is still some confusion among homeowners as far as where Proposition 58 leaves off and Proposition 19 picks up… with respect to tax breaks like the parent-child exclusion, low tax base issues, and all property tax benefits associated with property inherited from a parent.

We will attempt to dispel some of that homeowner confusion here today through  some well worn questions and answers among beneficiaries, estate & tax attorneys, property tax consultants and trust lenders in California.

Q: If we forgot to apply for the parent-to-child exclusion before Feb 16, 2021, can we still qualify for this exclusion anytime thereafter in 2021 to avoid property tax reassessment through Proposition 58 and Prop 193 for the grandparent-grandchild exclusion?

A: As long as the change in ownership of your property from your parent took place on or before Feb 15, 2021, the transfer will qualify for the exclusion under Proposition 58/193. The date of death is the same as the date of the change in ownership. However, bear in mind that your claim has to be filed with your County Assessor within 3 years of the date of transfer (or prior to transfer to a third party) or within six months of the date of notice of “supplemental” or “escape assessment”. So no, your actual claim did not have to be filed by Feb 16, 2021.

Q: Regarding Proposition 19, if I inherit my parent’s family home and move into it as a primary residence, do I have to reside in that house to take advantage of the parent-to-child exclusion? Can I move somewhere else?

A: Apparently at least one beneficiary has to reside full time in that family home in order to avoid property tax reassessment with the parent-child exclusion. Once that property is no longer your full time home it will be reassessed at current market rates.

Q: Property transfers were executed under Prop 58 prior to Prop 19 becoming law on Feb 16, 2021. Is it true that Proposition 58 can also apply to property transfers after Feb 15, 2021?

A: No, it is Proposition 19 that will apply to property transfers after Feb 16, 2021.

Q: How does Proposition 19 affect my inherited property that’s being held in an irrevocable trust?

A: First of all, the trust governs the property. For a home held in trust, tax law states that a change in ownership occurs when real property goes to anyone other than the trustor or the trustor’s spouse or “domestic partner” when a revocable trust becomes irrevocable, and cannot be revised. The date of the decedent’s passing is viewed as the date of change in ownership. Proposition 19 states that Prop 58 applies to transfers that were executed before Feb 15, 2021. Proposition 19 applies to transfers that occur after Feb 16, 2021.

Q: If a family home is given to three sibling beneficiaries as a gift, must all three siblings reside in this home as a primary residence in order to take advantage of the Prop 19 parent-to-child exclusion?

A: As long as at least one sibling inheriting this property continues to live in the home as a primary residence, or principal residence, the exclusion will remain active for that property, and that beneficiary.

Q: Does Proposition 19 apply to a property transfer of a rental home, as Proposition 58 did?

A: No, under Proposition 19 the parent-child exclusion from reassessment applies only to the transfer of a family home that remains the principal residence of the beneficiary that moved in and continues to live there.

Q: If the value of my inherited home is more than $1,000,000 exactly what are Proposition 19 rules and regulations concerning the parent-to-child exclusion?

A: Under Prop 19 it is the sum of the factored base year value plus $1,000,000. Should the assessed value exceed this limit, you can benefit from partial property tax reassessment, or partial property tax relief. The amount greater than the excluded amount would be added to the factored base year value.

Q: If my county Tax Assessor doesn’t know about the passing of my Dad before Feb 16, 2021, and becomes aware of his death 15 months later and so reassesses the property I inherited from my Dad on the date of my Dad’s passing… Is a parent-to-child transfer or  parent-to-child exclusion applied through Proposition 58 or Prop 19?

A: The law in effect today tells us that the date of death will apply. It has been made clear that Prop 58 applies to an inherited property transfer from a parent on or before Feb 15, 2021.  It’s important to remember that California Proposition 19 applies only to property transfers that go through after Feb 16, 2021.

Q: Now that Prop 58 parent-child exclusion has morphed into Prop 19 property tax breaks, how do I apply for the homeowners’ exemption or disabled veterans’ exemption within 12 months of the transfer to qualify for a parent-to-child exclusion and grandparent-to-grandchild property transfer exemption from fair market property tax rates, as dictated by Prop 19? Who can help me apply for homeowners’ exemption or or disabled veterans’ exemption in my county?

A: To keep it simple, a claim will have to be filed with your County Tax Assessor, who will be on the BOE list of all California Tax Assessors;  and who will inform you as to what forms to complete, to apply for the homeowners exemption or disabled veterans exemption.

 

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